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Jumping Position

This is a discussion on Jumping Position within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        10-14-2013, 12:15 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Jumping Position

    So, I have a tendency to really tuck my elbows to my body. To me, it just doesn't look right. I was wondering if anyone could sort of critique and give me ideas on how to fix it. I need solutions :)
    My mare is also fairly green. She free jumped prior to buying her, but I'm the first person she's ever carried across a jump.

    Thanks!


    [I originally put this on the Jumping board but figured this was a more accurate location. Thanks SJxDream for replying to the original thread and critique! :) ]


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        10-14-2013, 12:35 PM
      #2
    Super Moderator
    Your whole posture looks very stiff and tense, as if you're forcing yourself rather than going with the flow of the horse
    You have to learn to relax, your back is hollow and your neck looks stiff - so start there. Loosen up your shoulders and then your upper arms will drop more naturally rather than them wanting to cling to your sides
    I'm not sure how much weight your putting your stirrups to push yourself up - but I'm guessing quite a lot - your heels need to sink down but not be forced down - use strength from your thighs to get the forward position
    Corporal, Foxhunter and bkylem like this.
         
        10-23-2013, 06:44 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    I agree with jaydee. I'm guessing by the way that you took the jumps that your horse is quite green, and that would make you ride more defensively. I would maybe suggest doing some tiny crossrails and more groundwork to keep her calm over the jumps before you start working on your form. You will never be able to relax if your horse is tense, and vice versa. Once you are both relaxed, you will find that your release will improve greatly, you'll be able to hold your mare with your leg instead of just using your stirrup, and the whole picture will improve.

    Best of luck!! :)
    Corporal likes this.
         
        10-23-2013, 08:03 PM
      #4
    Trained
    Guess I'm not seeing it, but then again I am far from a talented jumper. What I see is a rider who is actively riding a horse dead straight to fences, getting a nice jump out of the horse, and riding the other side of the fence. That horse does look to be green and would probably be ducking out left & right with a passenger on board instead of the active rider in this video.

    Yes, she is a little stiff and defensive, but the overall position is solid, she's centered over her feet, not too far out of the tack, and just a little relaxation in the elbows would create a nice release. If that horse dirty stops, she's not going anywhere. I'll take her effective position any day. Would love to see what Allison sees.
    showjumperachel likes this.
         
        10-25-2013, 11:12 AM
      #5
    Yearling
    This could be just me, but I'd like to see a bit more consistency in the release. A couple times you were on, but a couple it was a bit late. It could be that you are riding defensively because it is a green horse, but I agree with the tense back and heels. It makes your entire body become unbalanced and is the reason your landings might look a bit off to you.

    MBP- you are right, just a bit of relaxing to make the whole enchilada a bit smoother to improve the rider,but I have to disagree on the dirty stop. If the rider is bracing to the point of being rigid, it is much easier to unseat than a balanced seat.

    Good luck, happy jumping!
         
        10-25-2013, 11:17 AM
      #6
    Trained
    I can't watch the video, but from the picture it looks like you aren't releasing with your hand as much as what I call trying to release with your body. This means instead of moving your hand forward you are throwing your body forward in the attempt to release.

    Although I will add, your release didn't look too bad, just quiet the upper body.
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        10-25-2013, 11:24 AM
      #7
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    That horse does look to be green and would probably be ducking out left & right with a passenger on board instead of the active rider in this video.
    The only reasons I predicted the horse to be green are for the following:

    The nature of the exercise she is riding. The way she halts the horse before and after each jump is typical with a horse that is a little high strung. I did this with Diamond while she had a rushing problem in order to cure it.

    Also, the defensiveness of her position leads me to believe this. I am FAR from an expert, I was just placing what I saw. If it is correct or not is far from guaranteed, as I don't know the horse or rider.
         
        10-25-2013, 03:47 PM
      #8
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by xJumperx    
    The only reasons I predicted the horse to be green are for the following:

    The nature of the exercise she is riding. The way she halts the horse before and after each jump is typical with a horse that is a little high strung. I did this with Diamond while she had a rushing problem in order to cure it.

    Also, the defensiveness of her position leads me to believe this. I am FAR from an expert, I was just placing what I saw. If it is correct or not is far from guaranteed, as I don't know the horse or rider.
    Totally agree. I also assumed green horse just by the way it is being schooled.
         
        10-26-2013, 10:05 AM
      #9
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    Totally agree. I also assumed green horse just by the way it is being schooled.
    You know what, I read your original post incorrectly and thought you said you thought the horse wasn't green at all, which is why I replied and restated all that. I'm a dunce at times, sorry about that :p
         
        11-19-2013, 02:48 PM
      #10
    Foal
    Oh wow. I didn't know I had so many replies. Thanks everyone for the input! This was one of the first times she ever jumped the barrels so she was very uncertain about them and would wiggle a bit during the approach.

    We mostly do small cross rails and verticals but she's very uninterested in small stuff. Since this video she's improved a lot, especially with the barrels. She doesn't wiggle anymore and I'm learning to relax more because I noticed that when I tense up she over jumps but when I relax she goes over the jump nicely and more confidently. That video was also in the first month of owning her, I believe, and I'm the first person she has carried over a jump. I just didn't have videos of her going over cross rails or anything. That was the only video at the time.

    When I get home in a little while I will post another video that's more recent of her going through a one stride combination.

    How is an ideal position acquired? I tend to either over bend, not lift my butt high enough, or tense up.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    jaydee likes this.
         

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