Jumping problem
   

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Jumping problem

This is a discussion on Jumping problem within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        06-27-2007, 03:19 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Jumping problem

    [[ I thought I posted this..but I checked all my posts and obviously I didn't, if you do see it anywhere let me know and I'll delete this one..lol ]]

    I have a problem many seem to have..overjumping and basically standing in the stirrups. I can do the proper two point position fine trotting/cantering around etc, but as soon as I start jumping it just goes a bit wrong- it doesn't seem to affect much, but it's not right, so does anyone have any advice on how to keep back in the saddle a bit more when jumping? Any tips would be much appreciated!

    Here's an example.. =S

         
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        06-27-2007, 08:49 AM
      #2
    Foal
    Hmmm well just lookin at the photo when you are jumpin do you normaly have you toes pointed out. Maybe this could be what is affecting you a bit try and work on puttin them back in place and then see what happends.
    You can also try when your horse is jumpin put your hands on his neck and sightly push your self down.
    I don't really no much about jumpin but that is what I would try to see if that would just help a bit to improve just till you get the idea of sittin back a bit more.
    Lol im more into dressage and westurn lol but ill try n help lol
         
        06-27-2007, 09:39 AM
      #3
    Foal
    Have someone set up a crossrail or two and then take your stirrups off the saddle then go over the crossrails. You can't stand in your stirrups if you don't have any!

    Hope this helps!
         
        06-27-2007, 12:58 PM
      #4
    Foal
    Also part of the reason you could be jumping ahead is that you are anticipating the jump too much. This happens to me all the time. Put a vertical at like 2 ft and take your horse over it normally. Then the next time you take him over it (her?) aim them at it and close your eyes about 4--5 strides out. Its kinda scary but the natural motion of the horse will pull you into 2 point and keep you from jumping ahead.
         
        06-27-2007, 07:59 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    I agree with Dublin. The rider of my gelding jumps bareback in the wintertime with beautiful form! No way she can stand up when she is doing this. I think it helps condition her position for when she is in saddle, but even with all that time bareback, she ends up getting too forward. Her reasoning is that she is trying to keep driving him into the jump at the canter (he likes to break into the trot), and she ends up leaning too far foward.

    I think it is just something you are going to have to be very concious about, and get it right in practice a million times or so to break the habit :) (like any other well developed bad habit) :

    Maybe also try to stay consious of keeping you knees in their original position - that might keep your overall body down and back where it should be? Maybe try to envision your position with your legs "anchoring" you over the jumps so you aren't pitched over the front if he/she ever refuses a jump. Good luck with your challenge :)
         
        06-28-2007, 03:04 AM
      #6
    Foal
    Thanks all! I'll have to try all those..bareback and no stirrups sounds good, and I'll definitely try jumping with my eyes closed..lol it sounds fun. =P
    My toe is pointed out coz I legged him off the ground (he gets a bit lazy) and also I'm leaning (i know, I know, another bad habit >.<) to the left a bit which is turning it out further.
    But thanks for all the suggestions, I'll definitely put them into practise!
         
        06-28-2007, 03:34 PM
      #7
    Foal
    I would try practicing your 2 point trotting over cavaletti and trotting small cross rails, with and without stirrups. Remember when jumping, you STAY in your 2 point, the horse comes up to you and then leaves. You do not need to change your position over the fence. Also, be careful not to pinch with your knee over the fence. This creates a pivot point compromising your position, pushing your body ahead and your lower leg back. Your toe should only be turned out at a 45 degree angle with your weight deeply in your heel and you calf on your horse at the girth. Keep in mind when you are in a 2 point, that there should at no time be any space or "air" between you and the saddle. 2 point is not standing in your stirrups, but rather shifting your weight off of your seat bones. Finally, remember to absorb the upward thrust of your horses jump through the angle of your thigh.
    Besides jumping ahead, you look really nice! You are releasing you horse very well, looking for your next fence, and look like a very capable rider.
    Keep up the good work!
         
        08-04-2007, 06:11 AM
      #8
    Foal
    I don't know if this will help you but when I had this problem (and I probably still do...) I closed my eyes like I think someone suggested already. I really had to fight the urge to go up into 2point before the jump to be ready but if you don't you will naturaly go with your horse and I found that doing this helped A LOT
         
        08-09-2007, 12:39 AM
      #9
    Foal
    I woudl really sit up before and over the fences and wait for the horse to take off. Your main issue is that you jump ahead. Wait and let the horse put you into the position and just flow with it. When riding you should just be there guideing the horse but not interfereing with his travel. If that makes sense.

    A row of bounces would be good for getting you to sit up, closeing your eyes as others have suggested is also good for getting you to feel it better.

    You are a capable/strong rider, keep up the good work.
         
        08-09-2007, 01:03 AM
      #10
    Foal
    I agree with Dressage Nerd she/he is right on track!
         

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