This is my 1 year old pinto Arabian/American Show horse. - Page 2
 
 

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This is my 1 year old pinto Arabian/American Show horse.

This is a discussion on This is my 1 year old pinto Arabian/American Show horse. within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Fat horse being ridden
  • "national show horse" OR "american show horse"

 
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    08-10-2008, 08:45 PM
  #11
Trained
Oh, and also, I would feed some hay twice a day. Pasture is lovely, but I like horses to get either a complete feed or some hay with them on top of that, Otherwise I feel like they turn out ribby from just pasture.
     
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    08-10-2008, 08:49 PM
  #12
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScoutRacer
The horses don't bother the barbed wire and the barbed wire don't bother the horses... we've never had a problem. :)
All it takes is one spook and a blind run to turn that cutie into chopped meat because he ran into the barbed wire

And I'll have to agree with some of the others. He'd be a great little gelding!
     
    08-10-2008, 08:52 PM
  #13
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spastic_Dove
I don't want to start a debate here, but you CAN know if a horse is worthy to breed when it is a year. What are his bloodlines like. What did his sire and dam accomplish? If it isn't OUTSTANDING don't breed him. I doubt you want to support horse slaughter. =/

Other than that I think he is adorable =)
That is not always true.

My horse has very good bloodlines and conformation and he was georgous as a foal. Passable as a yearling. I wanted to hide him from view as a 2 year old and now he is back to being georgous.

Horses go through stages and I have looked at this horse's background in another thread. What I see is a very breedable grand sire but nowhere near the type I like but that is neither here nor there. His offspring...Scouts sire is of lesser quality for the purpose that the grand sire was designed/bred for but I actually like him better (other than he is gaited) simply because he is more my type.

Now Scout to me has gone way off track to the original purpose for what was being bred for the show ring ( referring to the grandsire) and I personally would geld him as he is nowhere near what I think the expected breeding result from his sire's and dam's mating. Then I look at what mine went through. I waited past the yearling stage and past the hide the fugly 2 year old and pass the "OK" 3 year old.

Mine blossumed at 4 and older.
     
    08-10-2008, 08:53 PM
  #14
Foal
I'm going to stay out of this other than giving you some suggestions on putting weight on him.

As someone mentioned, feed him at least twice a day. Heck, feed him three times a day. I do that with my horse. It doesn't necessarily mean you have to give him tons more grain, either. I recently adjusted my horse from 2 times per day to 3 and I didn't give him more grain. I just spread it out equally. Two-three time a day feeding helps rather than just once because they aren't going empty,full, empty, full.

Also, a good supplement is Coco Soya. It's a sort of oil, fairly priced, and works wonders.

And go with what another person suggested as for the hay. :)
     
    08-10-2008, 08:58 PM
  #15
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spastic_Dove
I don't want to start a debate here, but you CAN know if a horse is worthy to breed when it is a year. What are his bloodlines like. What did his sire and dam accomplish? If it isn't OUTSTANDING don't breed him. I doubt you want to support horse slaughter. =/

Other than that I think he is adorable =)
That is not always true.

My horse has very good bloodlines and conformation and he was georgous as a foal. Passable as a yearling. I wanted to hide him from view as a 2 year old and now he is back to being georgous.

Horses go through stages and I have looked at this horse's background in another thread. What I see is a very breedable grand sire but nowhere near the type I like but that is neither here nor there. His offspring...Scouts sire is of lesser quality for the purpose that the grand sire was designed/bred for but I actually like him better (other than he is gaited) simply because he is more my type.

Now Scout to me has gone way off track to the original purpose for what was being bred for the show ring ( referring to the grandsire) and I personally would geld him as he is nowhere near what I think the expected breeding result from his sire's and dam's mating. Then I look at what mine went through. I waited past the yearling stage and past the hide the fugly 2 year old and pass the "OK" 3 year old.

Mine blossumed at 4 and older.
I agree, horses do go through stages, and conformation wise it is very hard to judge. Young horses are gangly and akward. But if they have mile long pasterns or club feet or something you're going to be able to see that.
What I meant was if you have a horse with a highly accomplished sire and a highly accomplished dam who has no incredible defaults that could be passed down or lead to a breakdown for the horse that is something I think would be safe to consider breeding.

However, a horse with a no-name sire or dam and any problematic conformational faults should not be bred.

This isn't talking about this horse in particular. I don't know anything about his bloodlines and I'm not evaluating his conformation. I was just talking about breeding in general. It is very possible to have a good idea of whether a yearling is breeding material or not.

I am also not trying to decide whether this horse is breedable or not, as I said before, I don't know anything about him really.

Of course, that also entails the whole "Why are you breeding" question which is a whole nother story. Which, if he were to be kept a stallion, I would wonder that. If that makes sense?

Hope that cleared up what I meant. If not I apologize in advance. My brain has gone on vacation. It's been storming for hours.
     
    08-10-2008, 09:07 PM
  #16
Showing
Concerning barbed wire. I have used it without problems for nearly 20 years UNTIL a few months ago. I had 2 horses on 25 acres of pasture then brought in a third horse.

As is my practice, I keep a new horse in the paddock adjoining the pasture. The paddock is about 3/4 acre and board fence on three sides but barbed wire where it meets the pasture. This is what happened when the mare (which cost me $4,500 the week before) wanted to join the other two.


I was very lucky that the cuts did not get into her muscle but was only skin. That is the vet giving her shots and stitches at a cost of $400 on a sunny Sunday morning.
     
    08-10-2008, 11:01 PM
  #17
Foal
Oh I am not saying that I know that nothing will go wrong for sure. Right now we have a lot of pasture with barbed wire and to redo it all would be a big job. I will keep it in mind for the future to take it down and put up normal wire.

As far as feeding hay to a horse that has plenty of pasture grass... if I was to put hay out in the pasture for them to eat... they would at best use it as bedding. They would much rather eat fresh green grass than dry hay. Can you blame them?
     
    08-10-2008, 11:18 PM
  #18
Yearling
If you can't take the criticism then don't ask for your horse to be critiqued.


Amen!

And yeah, barbed wire is pretty horrible. Don't take it into consideration; do something about it. There is a reason why EVERY horse book out there and every professional will tell you to get rid of it.

Other then that, he is very cute. I don't like how his neck ties into his body at all; there's a huge dip before his withers. Pretty common head. Can't really tell from anything else. A great gelding.
     
    08-10-2008, 11:50 PM
  #19
Weanling
Willy is on pasture most days, but he definitely gets at least a flake in the morning and flake at night no matter what. And he'll eat anything! He would definitely eat hay in his pasture....maybe just try it??? Your guy needs some supplemental forage.
     
    08-11-2008, 12:09 AM
  #20
Foal
Supplemental forage? The other 3 horses he's in pasture with are as fat as can be and they are being ridden everyday... He eats as much and as often as he wants. Horses are grazing animals... they eat grass and grass is what a horse does best on. He gets a full scoup of pelleted grain + 2 oz. Of vita-plus every day. I'm not saying additional source of calories wouldn't be good, but I am saying he should have plenty the way he is. I don't know if our horses are weird but I am not kidding if you put hay out there now... with all the grass they can eat... they wont even pay attention to it we've tried. Also I think a lot of if might be his age... he's growing up then filling out then growing up and filling out.

I do appreciate the advice I just like to argue for the most part.
     

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