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My Craptacularly Crippled Cayuse

This is a discussion on My Craptacularly Crippled Cayuse within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Crippled by a rear hock soft tissue injury horse

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    08-06-2011, 08:38 PM
  #11
Weanling
Love her colour. I'm not an expert, but I've always been told to look at horses and judge them on whether you'd want them in your barn. In her case, yes, I would Beautiful mare.
     
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    08-07-2011, 07:42 AM
  #12
Green Broke
Capped hocks rarely cause lameness by themselves. If the cap was caused by a blow, the horse may be lame as he heals from the initial trauma but most capped hocks are from repeated banging such as bedding on concrete or the like (when there are also capped elbows). I saw it so simply noted it.

By straight.. I mean from ner fetlock joints upr through her shoulder but especially at her knees. This straightness does not allow any (or much) shock absorption. It is not BACK at the knee which is much worse as you well know.. but over straight is not good. I suspect the soft tissue injury (or repetitive injury) may be partly due to that straightness.

Her hocks are not large for her body size. They are adequate, but not overly large. A roomier hock helps (again) with shock absorption.

Does this mean she is not a very nice Quarterhorse? No. It is simply the critique of the images. She is a fine animal.

I always look at any horse as if it were going to be bred (years of doing this). I look at this horse and want to find a stud with a less straight front and more bone. Of course, in the breed that is probably not going to happen easily but they are out there. Beyond that is finding one that not only counters the faults I see but one that has the prepotency to pass those better traits on to the offspring.

As I said.. it is a critique from photos. Does not mean she is not a fine looking animal.
     
    08-07-2011, 12:57 PM
  #13
Banned
I hope I'm not giving off the impression that I think my pony is perfect and beyond criticism--I mean, she is, but I don't want to seem all conceited... ;)

I'm trying to figure out what you're saying here--do you find 'over at the knees' to be a desirable trait?
     
    08-07-2011, 08:56 PM
  #14
Green Broke
Over at the knee is not desirable but it is mostly a cosmetic fault in my experience seeing lots of over at the knee horses working in their late teens and 20's.

Over straight is just that.. over straight.. no shock absorbing room. Conformation needs to be correct but it needs to be live. Straight is correct but your horse appears mathematically correct.. no wiggle room and without that you have no shock absorbing space. So if she steps wrong or lands hard it jars her all the way to her teeth.. or at least to her pasterns and her shoulder.

It is a fussy complaint on my part but I think her soft tissue issues coupled with demanding work (barrel racing) stem from this over straight front leg.
     
    08-07-2011, 09:02 PM
  #15
Banned
Now you've really piqued my interest. Do you have any photos showing your "ideal" knee, for a comparison?
     
    08-07-2011, 10:20 PM
  #16
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
Over at the knee is not desirable but it is mostly a cosmetic fault in my experience seeing lots of over at the knee horses working in their late teens and 20's.

Over straight is just that.. over straight.. no shock absorbing room. Conformation needs to be correct but it needs to be live.
Straight is correct but your horse appears mathematically correct..
No wiggle room and without that you have no shock absorbing space.
So if she steps wrong or lands hard it jars her all the way to her teeth..
Or at least to her pasterns and her shoulder.

It is a fussy complaint on my part but
I think her soft tissue issues coupled with demanding work (barrel racing) stem from this over straight front leg.
Hummm, interesting,..., I am curious to hear more also.
Something does appear 'off'' in the front legs to me also,..., maybe not so shock absorbing??
They do seem very straight, and then the fetlock angle on the fronts seems very sharp, and slightly longer, in comparison to the back legs.
     
    08-07-2011, 10:47 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by bubba13    
HAHAHAHAHA....what a bitty. But a very pretty one! I lovvvve her..she reminds me of my first horse. I just love her sassy face here...
     
    08-08-2011, 12:33 AM
  #18
Banned
WhoaNow, I'm not sure what you mean by sharp and long fetlocks? Are you referring to the angle and length of her pasterns?

I can absolutely buy the conformational predisposition to soft tissue problems--lord knows I've quizzed the vet about a dozen times on the very subject, to his great exasperation....and utter denial. But vets, even good ones, aren't always right about those things. And it would make more sense (and make me feel horribly guilty) if we could tie in the lameness to barrel racing, either through a specific incident or an accumulation of overuse. But again, every time she's come up lame, it's been after pulling her off the pasture. I do think there could be something to the theory that she had minor, subclinical desmitis of the DDFT, acquired during competition, general riding, running around the pasture, or whatever, that was then badly aggravated by the overloading of that leg due to the opposing abscess (and she was, indeed, quite happily galloping on three legs when the right abscess was so painful she couldn't even put the hoof down). If I'd known, I would have kept her up those days until the abscess burst, but then the vet had said to turn her out to help speed the process along, and hindsight IS 20/20.... When the vets at the hospital saw her MRI results, they couldn't say whether the three tears happened at the same time or separately. And they were amazed she was as sound as she was, given the severity of the injury.
     
    08-08-2011, 09:07 AM
  #19
Green Broke
Front pasterns typically have mnore slope than rear pasterns. 60% of the horse's weight are on the front legs.

I never let a horse out with an abscess that was 3 legged lame.. especially a hot horse that will gallop 3 legged. I kept the horse stalled or in a small paddock attached to the stall and wrapped or used a Professional's Choice support boot on the loaded leg and a poultice with a LOT of wrapping on the abscess foot. I also soaked the bad foot a LOT. If I could find the soft spot on the soul I would open the abscess and continue with poultices and soaking until there was no puss (I also used some antibiotic mastitis treatment in the hole). Then the horse was shod with a pad on that foot until the sole grew out and there was no hole. If the abscess came out at the coronary band, they the horse was shod with a toe clip and/or side clips and a pad (if Seedy toed) until it all grew out.

Yes.. letting a horse run around MAY bring the abscess to a head, but it can really make a mess of the loaded leg (including founder).

Of course, I am not your vet. I am just someone who has kicked around a bit with horses and cattle and I go with what has worked for me. Some of these things are not the latest and the greatest and I was doing this before the use of MRI's on horses (unless they were race horses or valuable horses that could be sent to a university where such things were being tested.. and the expense was beyond real).

I have handled horses of that caliber but never owned one, so I did what I could do with what I had at the time, which was just under 15 years ago.
     
    08-08-2011, 09:12 AM
  #20
Green Broke
FWIW here is a link to information regarding this type of injury:

Tendon Injuries
     

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