(New Here) flat critique - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 16 Old 05-25-2009, 09:55 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: May 2009
Location: Tennessee
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bump please!

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post #12 of 16 Old 05-25-2009, 04:51 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xChelseaxxSmilex View Post
Hello I am Chelsea and am new here. This video was taken about 3 years ago. I have only been riding for two years. I have trained Diamon by myself. I have went through so many instructors with him as they just wanted to train me on a different horse, so I just decided to follow other trainers ideas. I now have a instructor who is here to help both of us. This is the best video to critique I think but I have others you can check out on my yt page. Ps there is one clip where i'm in a hunter hack class, but most of it is flat.Thank you!


YouTube - Diamon-Baby It's Fact
I meant to say 3 weeks ago.lol. Sorry about that.

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post #13 of 16 Old 05-25-2009, 07:41 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2009
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Wow, he's a cute, cute, cute horse!
And you have a lovely back and posture! He looks really smooth. :)
I won't say anything else because everyone already said hands.
But good luck!
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post #14 of 16 Old 05-25-2009, 08:09 PM
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First I just want to say that wide hands actually aren't a bad thing when used effectively, like if you're using them to support your horse through turns and corners, or when approaching a jump. They can also be extremely helpful when riding young horses who have not yet fully developed their muscles & found their balance, or when riding any horse who has a tendency to stumble a lot.

For starters, you need to put more bend in your elbow and lift your hands. You never want to be resting your hands on your horse's neck or on your saddle. (The only exception to this would be reaching forward and grabbing mane if you feel yourself losing your balance, as breaking position is always preferable to ending up on the ground.)
I noticed that when you turn your horse, you tend to bring your inside hand way out and back. You should be turning your horse with your eyes, inside leg, and outside hand. The outside hand should have a consistant yet elastic feel on the rein, and act as both a support and a block - the support will help to keep your horse balanced through turns and corners, but it'll also serve to block him from veering away from the direction you want him to be going in. Your eyes and inside leg should work simultanously through turns. As you turn your head to look where you want him to go, your inside leg should apply pressure just behind the girth to push his back end out into your outside hand, allowing him to make a nice turn. Always looking ahead towards the next turn or obstacle (or towards the center, when making a circle) will help your horse anticipate where you want him to go, since by turning your head you also are making very subtle movements with your seat as well that your horse will pick up on (even though you probably won't even notice that you're doing it.) The only time you should really have to use your inside rein for turns is for corrections, such as when he ignores (or is unable to understand) your seat and leg, or becomes crooked. A simple squeeze with your fingers in a take-give motion on the inside rein is best, and this would be made easier for you if you shortened your reins a bit, since it would eliminate the need for you to pull your hand so far back (since essentially your hands should be staying even with one another).

He's a very lovely boy :)
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post #15 of 16 Old 05-25-2009, 09:24 PM Thread Starter
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Join Date: May 2009
Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gabrielstriumph View Post
Wow, he's a cute, cute, cute horse!
And you have a lovely back and posture! He looks really smooth. :)
I won't say anything else because everyone already said hands.
But good luck!
Thank you!

Wherever you go, go with all of your heart
xChelseaxxSmilex is offline  
post #16 of 16 Old 05-25-2009, 09:28 PM Thread Starter
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Join Date: May 2009
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 50
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quixotic View Post
First I just want to say that wide hands actually aren't a bad thing when used effectively, like if you're using them to support your horse through turns and corners, or when approaching a jump. They can also be extremely helpful when riding young horses who have not yet fully developed their muscles & found their balance, or when riding any horse who has a tendency to stumble a lot.

For starters, you need to put more bend in your elbow and lift your hands. You never want to be resting your hands on your horse's neck or on your saddle. (The only exception to this would be reaching forward and grabbing mane if you feel yourself losing your balance, as breaking position is always preferable to ending up on the ground.)
I noticed that when you turn your horse, you tend to bring your inside hand way out and back. You should be turning your horse with your eyes, inside leg, and outside hand. The outside hand should have a consistant yet elastic feel on the rein, and act as both a support and a block - the support will help to keep your horse balanced through turns and corners, but it'll also serve to block him from veering away from the direction you want him to be going in. Your eyes and inside leg should work simultanously through turns. As you turn your head to look where you want him to go, your inside leg should apply pressure just behind the girth to push his back end out into your outside hand, allowing him to make a nice turn. Always looking ahead towards the next turn or obstacle (or towards the center, when making a circle) will help your horse anticipate where you want him to go, since by turning your head you also are making very subtle movements with your seat as well that your horse will pick up on (even though you probably won't even notice that you're doing it.) The only time you should really have to use your inside rein for turns is for corrections, such as when he ignores (or is unable to understand) your seat and leg, or becomes crooked. A simple squeeze with your fingers in a take-give motion on the inside rein is best, and this would be made easier for you if you shortened your reins a bit, since it would eliminate the need for you to pull your hand so far back (since essentially your hands should be staying even with one another).

He's a very lovely boy :)
Thank you so much for explaining really well! I have some basic habits to fix that my new instructor is working on. I haven't had a instructor since last summer, so that's where I got the habits.lol. Thank you! He defaintly wasn't like that when I first got him. I wish I had a pic of him before.

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