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Please critique jumping

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        01-13-2011, 09:59 AM
      #11
    Yearling
    Thanks MudPaint, and Gidji for the helpful critiques.

    Mudpaint, Yes, my seat is not as strong as it used to be. I'm a little adamant about riding to the fence in the 2-point because she's still green and sometimes if I don't sit and drive her all the way to the fence she runs out. But I will try and see what happens, it doesn't hurt to try. Also, she'll see her spot way before I do and we kind of don't agree on it, she likes long spots and I like short spots..I think that's why I have that jumping ahead problem, I'm so afraid of getting left behind. I'm trying to work on getting her to listen to me instead of me just doing what she wants.

    Also is there anything I can do to get used to releasing more? Or should I just make a conscience effort to reach more on her neck while going over the jump? Also my hands fall on the sides of her neck a lot...is there anything I can do to prevent that? Maybe grab some mane?

    Gidji, I don't understand what you mean she's jumping awkwardly, She didn't touch any of the barrels, they're moved because my trainer was moving them. But she has never jumped anything like that before and they were in a different position every time I went over them.
         
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        01-13-2011, 10:09 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    At this point in time, you hands should be firmly pressed into the crest (right under the mane), but yes you can grab mane if you feel they move too much. Work on your release over poles, actively placing you hands further up. When I taught, I made a "course" of poles so my kids could get a feel of releasing and steering. Once your seat is more stable you can lower your hand to the side for an automatic release that just gives with the horses head/neck.

    Work on developing a good rolling, forward canter and keeping it consistent. Introduce poles with set striding so you learn to place the canter right in stride. I would prefer a long spot than a short. Chipping disrupts the flow of the jump and forward movement and lends to your jumping ahead. When you in your half seat use your lower leg to move your horse out, rather than pushing with your seat. If it's something you're not as familar with, try it over pole work first before jumps.
         
        01-13-2011, 10:19 AM
      #13
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MudPaint    
    At this point in time, you hands should be firmly pressed into the crest (right under the mane), but yes you can grab mane if you feel they move too much. Work on your release over poles, actively placing you hands further up. When I taught, I made a "course" of poles so my kids could get a feel of releasing and steering. Once your seat is more stable you can lower your hand to the side for an automatic release that just gives with the horses head/neck.

    Work on developing a good rolling, forward canter and keeping it consistent. Introduce poles with set striding so you learn to place the canter right in stride. I would prefer a long spot than a short. Chipping disrupts the flow of the jump and forward movement and lends to your jumping ahead. When you in your half seat use your lower leg to move your horse out, rather than pushing with your seat. If it's something you're not as familar with, try it over pole work first before jumps.
    I'll try that...thank you.
         
        01-23-2011, 12:50 AM
      #14
    Foal
    I think you are curving your back a little bit too much, :) maybe just bring your hips back, and push your chest out to curve the other way, I hoope this made sense, but that's what I most noticed for anything bad :)
         
        01-23-2011, 02:09 PM
      #15
    Foal
    I wud say about the barrel moving they are fine how they are.... with a jump so small and a horse that big really the horse aint going to hit them that hard unless he just runs through them and forgets that to go over them he will have to jump lol. Any way what I am trying to say is there shouldnt be many problems if you leave them I hav them at home and even when I do hit them (and that's on hills) they don't roll enough to cause any problems as your horses landing distance will naturally avoid problems so yeah don't fret and have fun!!!
         
        01-24-2011, 12:30 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    I understand being more comfortable with short spots, I used to be the same way, but as I progressed in my riding and worked more towards training, I found that most green horses tend to take the long spot. I've found that when training a horse in jumping I've had good results with letting the horse pick their own spot at first. I like to stay light on their back but still make sure to give them some encouragement and not drop them completely. I've found in most of the horses that I've worked with that this tends to build their confidence, and once the horse is comfortable with jumping I begin to alter their strides and try to put them in the spots that I like. (Obviously this is all done over fairly low uncomplicated jumps). Not only will this help your horse, but I found that once I got used to the idea that the horse really doesn't need to be right up at the fence in order to jump it safely, I got a whole lot better at following the horse and not getting ahead or left behind.

    I'm not sure if I explained that well or not, lol. It took me a while to get the hang of when my trainer first introduced it to me, but I've found it to work pretty well. Hope it helps :] I think everyone else has covered the other things.
         
        01-24-2011, 12:59 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by xeventer17    
    I understand being more comfortable with short spots, I used to be the same way, but as I progressed in my riding and worked more towards training, I found that most green horses tend to take the long spot. I've found that when training a horse in jumping I've had good results with letting the horse pick their own spot at first. I like to stay light on their back but still make sure to give them some encouragement and not drop them completely. I've found in most of the horses that I've worked with that this tends to build their confidence, and once the horse is comfortable with jumping I begin to alter their strides and try to put them in the spots that I like. (Obviously this is all done over fairly low uncomplicated jumps). Not only will this help your horse, but I found that once I got used to the idea that the horse really doesn't need to be right up at the fence in order to jump it safely, I got a whole lot better at following the horse and not getting ahead or left behind.

    I'm not sure if I explained that well or not, lol. It took me a while to get the hang of when my trainer first introduced it to me, but I've found it to work pretty well. Hope it helps :] I think everyone else has covered the other things.

    Thanks! That did help
         

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