please critique my riding.thanks
   

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please critique my riding.thanks

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        04-13-2008, 05:44 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    please critique my riding.thanks

    Here is some pics of me riding and there is a video from youtube of me jumping my babyboo..please critique me. Anything will be helpful. Please read the description though, before you post a comment on my video. Thanks!!! I taught myself how to jump and I trained duke how to jump also..we are not perfect..but any help would be great. Also is you have any tips on how to train a horse to jump. Thanks!! Okay. Some people say that I would benefit from lessons. I would take lessons if I could. I can't afford it. That is why im training him myself and trying to teach me by my friends and when my boss is teaching lessons and im not. I do teach beginner lessons. But im not that good at jumping yet. I know I need to look up and keep my back and stuff straight. Before we started jumping,we went on a five mile trail ride. Duke was tired and so was I. He would not stay in a constant canter. He kept dropping it. I know my diagonals are off in some places.. this weekend I will hopefully have a new vid up this weekend.. and duke will have energy this time.





    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ll2sE_dWF1Q
         
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        04-13-2008, 06:32 PM
      #2
    Weanling
    Looking at the second pic - you really need to work on keeping your eyes up. You end up where you are looking - so look ahead, not on the ground or you may end up there.

    On your approach to the jump, try to have your pace (canter or trot) established for multiple strides (like 6+) before the jump. A number of times you seemed to just take off going towards it, and hit your pace 1 - 2 strides before. You really need a consistent pace whenever you are working, and if you ask him to speed up only a few strides out, you may inadvertently teach him to rush the jumps. Not something you want to happen.

    On the landing, work on keeping him straight. He turned sharply left on you during the vid, and besides making it hard to stay on coarse, it can eventually unseat you if he does it unexpectedly - which they will (saw it happen this weekend). Pick a point far away, like towards the far fence in the riding area, and canter away from the jump to it in a straight line, and then stop.

    I hope this helps some, I'm sure other people will have other ideas also. These are just the first things I would work on personally.
         
        04-13-2008, 06:34 PM
      #3
    Weanling
    For teaching yourself to jump, you're doing ok.
    I would suggest getting lessons though; its really beneficial to have someone on the ground to correct you.
    A few things I noticed:
    Eyes up, always! Look ahead, find something to keep your eyes on, whether its a fence, a tree.. something stationary to keep you looking ahead. And shorten your reins, if you need to bring them to your lap to have contact they are too long!
    Your second pic scares me! You say you want to teach him to jump from his hindquarters- he is on the forehand here. Sit up and wait for the jump. Don't arch your back (think shoulders back and eyes up).

    That's about it, good luck!
         
        04-13-2008, 07:11 PM
      #4
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sandsarita
    Looking at the second pic - you really need to work on keeping your eyes up. You end up where you are looking - so look ahead, not on the ground or you may end up there.

    On your approach to the jump, try to have your pace (canter or trot) established for multiple strides (like 6+) before the jump. A number of times you seemed to just take off going towards it, and hit your pace 1 - 2 strides before. You really need a consistent pace whenever you are working, and if you ask him to speed up only a few strides out, you may inadvertently teach him to rush the jumps. Not something you want to happen.

    On the landing, work on keeping him straight. He turned sharply left on you during the vid, and besides making it hard to stay on coarse, it can eventually unseat you if he does it unexpectedly - which they will (saw it happen this weekend). Pick a point far away, like towards the far fence in the riding area, and canter away from the jump to it in a straight line, and then stop.

    I hope this helps some, I'm sure other people will have other ideas also. These are just the first things I would work on personally.
    Agreed

    You also need to work with staying with him. It seemed that you tried to jump for him so you were going foward before he took off. And that caused you to come back to early. To try and help you feel the take off better ride an experienced horse and jump it without irons. This will help you feel the take off.

    Also make sure you squeeze over the fence to help him. No matter the hieght you have to help your horse. You have to squeeze to let him know to take off and how long to stay in the air. I know it sounds like why should I do that, they know, but the horse doesn't know. If you don't squeeze to help a horse, they are going to start blowing through fences or taking off with out you. Also when you start jumping higher and your turning over a fence you have to help them know when they can bring their back legs down without hitting a rail.

    It looks like you have very nice basics and I think lessons would deffinately help. Good job on how far you've got already and keep us updated.
         
        04-14-2008, 12:46 AM
      #5
    Trained
    I didnt read everyone elses replies so I apologise if I repeat anything.

    - look up and watch where you are going. You don't need to see either the ground or his legs. You should be able to feel and count the strides while still confidently looking ahead at the jump or better yet, beyond the jump
    - get a steady canter going a lot sooner than 1 or 2 strides before the jump. You should have at least 4 strides if not 5 or 6 to steady yourself before the jump
    - sit up and ride to the fence. Let the fence come to you eg; don't attack the fence. Sit upright with your shoulders back. Try and measure out if you can a minimum of 4 strides distance from the jump (1 stride = 12ft). Try and keep the horse on a path the suits his strides and will make him 'in time' for the jump. You can shorten or lengthen strides to help you out but that is a whole different story :) you could try putting a few trot poles at intervals of 12ft leading up the jump. This will get him in stride and help him learn where to jump the jump as at the moment he is jumping from all kinds of distances away :)
    - release a little more. You always want to keep a steady contact with the bit but you need to have the elasticity in your hands to be able to keep the contact but go with his head and not 'pop' him in the mouth on the downwards fall
    - don't anticipate the jump or get ahead of the jump by going into a 2 point position before the fence. This is ok if you approach the fence like that for the purpose f training yourself into your 2 point seat but doesnt have a place in normal jumping

    Hope that helps :)
         
        04-14-2008, 07:57 PM
      #6
    Started
    Look ahead, not at your horse's head. You're also anticipating the jump.
         
        04-15-2008, 05:52 AM
      #7
    Weanling
    Agreeing with everyone else...

    Also your sitting to heavy in the saddle, take some weight in your heels and don't slouch.
         
        04-15-2008, 09:42 AM
      #8
    Weanling
    I also just noticed that it looks like you're riding in a dressage saddle. You might want to look into getting a jumping or an all purpose saddle; it will help to put in a better seat for jumping. Dressage saddles will seat you in the middle of your horse and are designed to be ridden in a more upright position, where in an all purpose you can ride a half seat much more effectively.
         
        04-15-2008, 11:07 AM
      #9
    Yearling
    thanks

    Thanks for all the help. This weekend ill make another vid of me and him, hopefully better and with a jumping saddle if I can find one. Thanks..
         

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