Should I geld him?
   

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Should I geld him?

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  • Should i geld my stallion
  • Should unused stallions be gelded

 
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    02-13-2011, 05:32 PM
  #1
Weanling
Should I geld him?

He is still a stallion, an Ex racehorse who did pretty good in claimers and allowances (4 wins, two shows in 6 races). He is well behaved for a stud, and I was thinking about breeding him to my cremello QH for an appendix before I geld him. He looks beautiful to me... Honest opinions welcome.
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    02-13-2011, 05:33 PM
  #2
Showing
How is he off the track? Has he been retrained in anything? Do you have a better conformation photo of him?
     
    02-13-2011, 05:45 PM
  #3
Banned
I can't tell anything from the photo other than he has a gorgeous coat color. Could you show us a conformation shot?

Anyway, If you are only going to breed him to your mare before you geld him, I really don't see any harm in that (providing he has good conformation and a nice temperment).
     
    02-13-2011, 05:53 PM
  #4
Yearling
He does look like a lovely boy. My opinion is two parts:

1. Are you going to show him, and what are his bloodlines?
If he has excellent/great/good bloodlines and will be aggressively shown (hunter/jumper/dressage, etc.) then YES. Keep him as a stallion, as his value will probably increase if he proves to be an excellent show horse.
If someone where to walk up to me and say "I have a rescue (or) off the track stallion. He's papered with pretty nice lines, great tempermant, and shows great potential as a Dressage/Jumper/Hunter/Eventing horse. Should I geld him?"
I would tell them NO. TEST him first, and if he proves worthy, let him keep the family jewels. If he proves to be unworthy, stupid, completely harebrained...snip him. You'll have a fine little competition gelding.

2. If you are NOT going to show him as his bloodlines are POOR.
Then GELD. An unproven, unshown, OTTB stallion is pretty much worthless. To be perfectly honest, any unproven, unshown stallion is worthless. I don't care how pretty, how nice the lines, how mellow the attitude, how beautiful the offspring, if he hasn't proven himself, he's not worth more then your average trail gelding. If your breeding for family and trail horses, then great! But if your breeding for competition or show....I suggest a little snipping.
Better off a gelding then an unused stallion that can possibly cause a Whoopsie!


For the Appendix foal, if you think he compliments your mare nicely, go for it. I have two geldings out of unshown stock and they are EXCELLENT for what they are bred for-long, hard, trail rides. If your breeding for competition, and feel that the pairing would produce a competition minded foal, why not?
     
    02-13-2011, 06:31 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by twogeldings    
He does look like a lovely boy. My opinion is two parts:

1. Are you going to show him, and what are his bloodlines?
If he has excellent/great/good bloodlines and will be aggressively shown (hunter/jumper/dressage, etc.) then YES. Keep him as a stallion, as his value will probably increase if he proves to be an excellent show horse.
If someone where to walk up to me and say "I have a rescue (or) off the track stallion. He's papered with pretty nice lines, great tempermant, and shows great potential as a Dressage/Jumper/Hunter/Eventing horse. Should I geld him?"
I would tell them NO. TEST him first, and if he proves worthy, let him keep the family jewels. If he proves to be unworthy, stupid, completely harebrained...snip him. You'll have a fine little competition gelding.

2. If you are NOT going to show him as his bloodlines are POOR.
Then GELD. An unproven, unshown, OTTB stallion is pretty much worthless. To be perfectly honest, any unproven, unshown stallion is worthless. I don't care how pretty, how nice the lines, how mellow the attitude, how beautiful the offspring, if he hasn't proven himself, he's not worth more then your average trail gelding. If your breeding for family and trail horses, then great! But if your breeding for competition or show....I suggest a little snipping.
Better off a gelding then an unused stallion that can possibly cause a Whoopsie!


For the Appendix foal, if you think he compliments your mare nicely, go for it. I have two geldings out of unshown stock and they are EXCELLENT for what they are bred for-long, hard, trail rides. If your breeding for competition, and feel that the pairing would produce a competition minded foal, why not?
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    02-13-2011, 06:40 PM
  #6
Foal
He's a lovely boy!! Is he 100% manageable?
How long have you had him for?

Twogeldings has spoken some wise words there. Lots to think about!

I am sure that this isn't your case, but lots of people put their mare to a stallion without really thinking about it.
I don't know much about breeding personally, but I have a very good friend who breeds horses for a living.

The things I would think about are, as twogeldings says: bloodlines and conformation but also personality.
As you know, with a foal you won't get the best of both parents and you might end up with a foal who is far from your expectations.

Also, how old is your mare? Breeding a foal can be a fabulous experience but it can also turn into a nightmare.
A friend of mine lost her mare in birth and the foal died a few days afterwards. Obviously I'm not trying to put you off or be pessimistic but you need to think about all aspects of it.

Even if you do decide to geld your boy, you could still put your mare in foal to another stallion at some point!
     
    02-13-2011, 06:50 PM
  #7
Weanling
Thank you all for your opinions. I would have to go take a picture for a conformation shot. None of mine fit the bill. I guess I though that one showed him off well. His sire is skimming- dam, red hot girl. How he is off the track? Not sure what you mean by that, but his owners went bankrupt and could not afford the 100$ a day training/board... He had a quarter crack too. Not sure if that was your question though. The truth of the matter is I will never show him, and he will be gelded eventually. I think geldings are happier animals. I am not a horse breeder, I am an endurance rider. I guess I don't know what you mean by "compliment". Because they are different breeds. My goal for the foal would be a bigger horse for my boyfriend to ride on endurance rides, that can keep up with my Arabs. I will also admit that part of it is the color possibilities of said foal. I have always wanted a palomino or buckskin.
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    02-13-2011, 06:54 PM
  #8
Showing
By "how is he off the track", I meant, how is he in his off-track career? Has he excelled in, say, dressage, or English pleasure, since coming off the track? Do you have plans to train him in a new career?

A picture of him standing square, taken from the side with no saddle and on even ground will help us out a lot.
     
    02-13-2011, 06:57 PM
  #9
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by christabelle    
I guess I don't know what you mean by "compliment".
A "complemeting" breeding pair is the quality of the match.

Both horses should have good conformation ot begin with, but if the mare has a slightly long back, you would look for a stud with a short strong back to hopefully compensate for it in the foal.

If you want a durable, energetic horse, and the stud has stamina, but is prone to injury, you would choose a mare who was very hardy.

Hope that clarifies.
     
    02-13-2011, 06:59 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by christabelle    
I guess I don't know what you mean by "compliment". Because they are different breeds.
Compliment, meaning if he and the mare have any minor conformation flaws, will they cancel each other out, or for example, are you breeding a long back to a long back, knowing the result will be a long and possibly weak spot in the foal's conformation. Or breeding a long back to a short back, to essentially try to get something in the middle. If both horses have the same conformation faults, it is much more likely the foal will have these poor traits as well.

It would help if we had confo shots of both the mare and the stallion, then some of our more experienced breeders could tell you what you are looking at in terms of possible problems. But as long as there are no glaring problems in either of them, I see no problem with a one time breeding. Just keep in mind that the foal you get may or may not end up being the right one for what you need. You just have to be prepared for the possibility.

From the picture you posted, he's a pretty boy. It's just hard to get a clear view.

ETA, knack for horses, you and I posted at the same time, lol.
     

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