Struggle w/ 2 point
 
 

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Struggle w/ 2 point

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  • Ride balanced two point on horse
  • Why do i struggle to ride in 2-point?

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    10-06-2013, 06:37 PM
  #1
Foal
Struggle w/ 2 point

So I am having the hardest time with my 2 point....idk if its because I'm bigger or out of shape.... But I am working with a trainer....any suggestions are welcome!
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    10-06-2013, 06:38 PM
  #2
Foal
I guess I feel I struggle with getting up! I can't stay up very long and I feel I will fall forward!
     
    10-06-2013, 06:53 PM
  #3
Showing
2-point at the walk when you warm up, and transition up into trot, then down again into walk. You aren't allowed to sit down until you start to become balanced.

It'll get better :) Make sure you don't allow your back to be too ridgid. Nice and soft and rounded
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    10-06-2013, 07:09 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
Why are you needing to practice 2 Point?
Are you intending to compete in jumping classes?
     
    10-06-2013, 07:19 PM
  #5
Foal
I show hunters
     
    10-06-2013, 07:21 PM
  #6
Yearling
I'm a heavier rider also.
I find if I over-arched my back it took me out of balance...
You appear to be trying so hard you are defeating yourself. A flatter back will also tuck your tush back under you some so you don't have "tail waving in the air" perchy look to you.

It is also a harder thing to do if your "core" muscles (abdominal) are not what they need to be...they will get there.

In the meantime, use your arms and hands to balance on while working those muscles to stronger.
Remember the horse is to rise to you, you do not rise over the horse or you will take a nasty fall if the horse sudden stops or ducks out...

Go look at some of the George Morris jumping critiques he has done... you can learn a lot by looking at pictures of others and reading what a true expert says about their form. You can't get much if at all better than George...

"Classic form" not "fad" in style of riding will help you. I can't explain it better...but go look and see the written blurbs...

Don't give up, nothing worth having or doing in this equestrian world was easy to achieve.
     
    10-06-2013, 07:26 PM
  #7
Foal
Thank you!!!
     
    10-06-2013, 08:00 PM
  #8
Trained
Pointing your toes out helps balance you a bit better, gives you a wider platform. Helped me a bunch when I first starting doing 2 point.
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    10-06-2013, 09:15 PM
  #9
Foal
Please don't 2pt with toes out - that is such a tough habit to break once you've gotten used to it! Plus it lend to start gripping with your calf and taking your knee off.

The thing that stuck with me when I was learning to 2pt (I was a bigger girl too) was my trainer telling me not to over try. Devote 10-15 minutes ever ride to really practicing your true 2pt (can be divided up over 1-2 minute attempts) but then let it be. It's better to really concentrate for those short burst, do it well and right - then to struggle all through the ride at 75%. Slowly you'll get stronger doing it right (don't take short cuts) and can increase length and start trotting, or going over polls, etc.

It's like if you've never jogged before. Every good running/jogger will tell you not to over train and to do 1minute of jog - 3 minutes of walk, etc for a 20minute "run". Same with getting the muscle and stamina to do 2pt.
     
    10-06-2013, 09:35 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by jagman6201    
Please don't 2pt with toes out - that is such a tough habit to break once you've gotten used to it! Plus it lend to start gripping with your calf and taking your knee off...
Hmmmm...George Morris, Littauer, Chamberlin and others with a pretty impressive track record disagree with you. The US Cavalry manual said:

"Toes turned in stiffen the ankles, force the heels out, and cause loss of contact of proper parts of the calves of the legs. This fault reduces the security of the rider and makes the correct use of the legs impossible. Excessively turned out toes stiffen the ankles, put the knees out of contact, place the rider on the back of his thighs and disrupt the seat."

Where is that sweet spot? It varies for each person and depends in part on what horse they are on. It could run as little as 10 deg, or as much as 45 deg.
     

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