Tell me if I'm doing better please
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding Critique

Tell me if I'm doing better please

This is a discussion on Tell me if I'm doing better please within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • I am doing horse riding
  • How can i tell if i'm a good rider

Like Tree7Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-25-2012, 10:10 PM
  #1
Yearling
Tell me if I'm doing better please

So, I most def. Have got it back please let me know how I look here and pick me apart lol thanks guys! My legs look more bouncy than they actually are because I kept kicking him to keep up ( I need spurs ) and sorry for the shakiness in some areas (my BF doesn't know how to hold a camera lol)

Trot

Canter

Both
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-25-2012, 11:16 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
Ok. First off, I see a LOT of improvement. A lot. You've done a good job so far in working on your seat, so kudos to you. Flash is a nice horse, and the better you get, the nicer he'll look as he starts to feel better able to lower his head and lift up his back.

But, that depends on him having a good saddle fit. This is something you want to truly verify in any case where a horse runs with his head up and a bit of a braced, hollow back, as does Flash.

The other thing is for you to get a bit quieter in your sitting on him. You really did better at the canter than the trot, and that canter was WORLDS better than the one you posted before.

It think that one of the things is that you are rolled just a wee bit too far forward on your "pee-pee". IT's called a "fork seat". Things go ok as long as the horse doesn't make any sudden changes of speed or direction. But it means that you can't quite absorb movement as well and you don't have the ability to make the horse come to your seat (i.e, control his speed and energy with your seat and core muscles).
AND , your stirrups are too long. Your are riding with your toe pointed downward, so-called "fishing for your stirrups". While doing this, you get rigid in your knee and your whole lower leg comes off the horse, putting you even more in the fork position. It is possible that the saddle is too wide in the front, thus it drops down over his withers, giving it a downward slant that puts you on your fork AND makes the top of the saddle bump the top of his wither bones and/or gouges into his shoulders, (thus the hollowed out back).

Your upper body is , again, much better than before.

Thankyou for sharing these videos. One day you will look back and say, "I rode like that?!"
Cinder likes this.
     
    07-25-2012, 11:22 PM
  #3
Yearling
Thank you for the feedback tinyliny. I know what you mean about how he carries himself, but he carries himself like that even when he has no rider OR tack on and he has seen the vet and chiro. And nothing is wrong physically. He has a bad ewe neck as well. How can I work with him on the ground to fix this? I already look back at my older vids and say omg I rode like that? LOL it only gets better from here =)
Back2Horseback likes this.
     
    07-25-2012, 11:48 PM
  #4
Trained
You are getting better, your first few vids there scared me, I thought you would break something. Good job, and get you elbows in and your legs back so they don't swing. Again, I am impressed on the improvement!
     
    07-26-2012, 12:00 AM
  #5
Super Moderator
What kind of bit are you using? It looked like a tom thumb, no? Though you really have improved a lot for such a short time, you still are not stable enough to make your holding of the reins as smooth as is best for a shanked bit . I think I might put him in a simple snaffle for a bit, and do a lot more changes of directions. Do some serpentines. Slow down. Get your position good, and keep it good at a walk, and if he gets antsy, do serpentives . A horse that is bent laterally cannot hollow out very easily.

TRy this:

Sit in the saddle . Scooch forward a bit so that you are in the very deepest part of the saddle. Now, you are going to "find your seatbones". (have someone hold the bridle so he will stand quietly). Drop the reins. Take your feet out of the stirrup and bring them up in front of you until your heels are on each side of his wither, as high as you can, but do NOT round your back. STay upright. You will need to have firm abs to do this. Feel your seat bones pushing straight down into the saddle. When you feel them and they are pointing STRAIGHT down, lower your legs . Try to keep your upper body still and with out change. Let your legs hang down on the saddle. Lift up the front of your toe and find your stirrup. Take a few deep breathes, and walk on. KEEP this good position.

Forget going fast, just walk but really stay connected to your body and your breath. Encourage your horse to take the rein forward and downward and stretch out his neck and walk out with big, loose strides. When he does, take one hand down and pet him, but don't let your torso fall forward.

Do this A LOT!
Back2Horseback likes this.
     
    07-26-2012, 01:20 AM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by waresbear    
You are getting better, your first few vids there scared me, I thought you would break something. Good job, and get you elbows in and your legs back so they don't swing. Again, I am impressed on the improvement!
LOL yea I was pretty bad the first couple of times, after being off for years and having zero confidence lol thank you for the critique I will def. Work on my elbows and leg
     
    07-26-2012, 01:22 AM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
What kind of bit are you using? It looked like a tom thumb, no? Though you really have improved a lot for such a short time, you still are not stable enough to make your holding of the reins as smooth as is best for a shanked bit . I think I might put him in a simple snaffle for a bit, and do a lot more changes of directions. Do some serpentines. Slow down. Get your position good, and keep it good at a walk, and if he gets antsy, do serpentives . A horse that is bent laterally cannot hollow out very easily.

TRy this:

Sit in the saddle . Scooch forward a bit so that you are in the very deepest part of the saddle. Now, you are going to "find your seatbones". (have someone hold the bridle so he will stand quietly). Drop the reins. Take your feet out of the stirrup and bring them up in front of you until your heels are on each side of his wither, as high as you can, but do NOT round your back. STay upright. You will need to have firm abs to do this. Feel your seat bones pushing straight down into the saddle. When you feel them and they are pointing STRAIGHT down, lower your legs . Try to keep your upper body still and with out change. Let your legs hang down on the saddle. Lift up the front of your toe and find your stirrup. Take a few deep breathes, and walk on. KEEP this good position.

Forget going fast, just walk but really stay connected to your body and your breath. Encourage your horse to take the rein forward and downward and stretch out his neck and walk out with big, loose strides. When he does, take one hand down and pet him, but don't let your torso fall forward.

Do this A LOT!
It is not a tom thumb bit, I'm using a curb bit on him. I will put him in a simple snaffle I have next time I ride and work on directional changes. Thanks for the suggestions I will def. Try those things out!
     
    07-26-2012, 01:33 AM
  #8
Super Moderator
By the way, Flash would look awesome English!
     
    07-26-2012, 01:39 AM
  #9
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
By the way, Flash would look awesome English!
I will tack him up English when I go out tomorrow night. I like English LOTS better
Back2Horseback likes this.
     
    07-26-2012, 03:04 AM
  #10
Super Moderator
Definitely better.

Now, I would like to see you work on slowing the rhythm down. You are maining a tighter rein than you want in a western horse and the horse is trotting too fast.

You need to half halt to slow him down, then offer a loose rein release to reward him. If he stays slow, you stay looser. If he takes advantage of the loose rein to speed up, you simply half halt him and slow him down again and release again. Eventually, your horse will realize that when he stays slower, he gets that nice loose rein.
Back2Horseback likes this.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0