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thanks!

This is a discussion on thanks! within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

    View Poll Results: leave as a stud until I find out his potential or geld?
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        07-18-2007, 10:47 AM
      #11
    Started
    Toes out and he's got a pretty short neck (looks ewe). I wouldn't breed him, but he looks like he's going to be a great riding horse.
         
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        07-18-2007, 10:53 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    Toes out - A GOOD quarter horse has there toes out.
    A QH breeder told me that one (people who bred my filly).

    There American QH colt they are buying from american and shipping it to australia his toes are turned out.
    Dosnt mean he is a bad horse Far the oppisite really. $20,000 worth of colt there (the American QH).

    Its the same with arabians .. there toes are out as well (the good bred ones)..

    I've already explained to you about his neck.

    He is Beautiful =) don't like anyone else make you think any different.
         
        07-18-2007, 01:54 PM
      #13
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by *ArabianPrincess*
    Toes out - A GOOD quarter horse has there toes out.
    Really, why? I always assumed that a straight stride was the most desirable as it puts the least strain on the horse's joints. I know slight deviations are to be expected, but why is toeing out better than straight or toeing in? Don't want to hijack your thread, but I'm curious if anyone can shed some light on this.
         
        07-18-2007, 06:24 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sara
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by *ArabianPrincess*
    Toes out - A GOOD quarter horse has there toes out.
    Really, why? I always assumed that a straight stride was the most desirable as it puts the least strain on the horse's joints. I know slight deviations are to be expected, but why is toeing out better than straight or toeing in? Don't want to hijack your thread, but I'm curious if anyone can shed some light on this.
    I'm wondering the exact thing. Toeing out is a conformational fault for all breeds. This will save time in explanation:

    "Toed-Out/Lateral Deviation of Pastern from Fetlock/ Fetlock Valgus [31]

    * An angular limb deformity that creates a toed-out appearance from the fetlock down.
    * A fairly common fault
    * Creates excess strain on one side of the hoof, pastern and fetlock, predisposing the horse to DJD, ringbone, foot soreness or bruising.
    * The horse will tend to wing, possibly causing an interference injury. May damage splint or cannon bone.
    * This conformation diminishes the push from rear legs, as symmetry and timing of the striding is altered with the rotated foot placement, particularity at the trot. Thus, stride efficiency is affected to slow the horse’s gait.
    * The horse is unable to sustain years of hard work."

    (wikipedia)
         
        07-18-2007, 06:35 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Thanks kristy for that info. I was doing some research on this (toeing out) and found a couple of sites (not sure how dependable they are, of course) that mentioned that some may go through this phase when younger and will grow out of it once the chest widens. Do you have any idea if this is plausible?
         
        07-18-2007, 06:40 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    Yes, it's absolutely possible. Honestly, I think babies are cute momentarily, then they go through growing stages which can make their bodies quite.. horrendous. I personally will not critically judge a youngster until they are full grown only because they can change so drastically.
         
        07-18-2007, 06:55 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Haha, I agree. Some days I think awww how cute and then it seems the very next day I'm thinking holy cow what happened.

    Thanks to everyone...I had no idea I would end up learning this much from my post!
         
        07-19-2007, 01:48 AM
      #18
    Foal
    Quote:
    Quarter Horses are Ment to be slightly built down hill and on the forehand (as I've been told).. If there not they are incorrectly bred,
    Not sure who told you this, but it's not quite true. Those who are bred for cutting tend to be more downhill because they then look like they're getting down lower and after the cow, but a good halter horse isn't going to be going downhill.

    Quote:
    Toes out - A GOOD quarter horse has there toes out.
    I think I'd fire your qh source
         
        07-19-2007, 01:49 AM
      #19
    Foal
    Quote:
    Quarter Horses are Ment to be slightly built down hill and on the forehand (as I've been told).. If there not they are incorrectly bred,
    Not sure who told you this, but it's not quite true. Those who are bred for cutting tend to be more downhill because they then look like they're getting down lower and after the cow, but a good halter/rail horse isn't going to be going downhill.

    Quote:
    Toes out - A GOOD quarter horse has there toes out.
    I think I'd fire your qh source
         
        07-21-2007, 11:07 AM
      #20
    Foal
    If you're new to horses, stallions really aren't the thing to start out with. He seems like a quiet boy now, but when they start getting interested in mares it can be a whole different ball game and very dangerous. That aside, he is cute and nice looking, but the legs really bother me. He definitely toes out and in the qh breeding world, it's a pretty big no-no. I think he'll make you one heck of a gelding, and if you come to a time where you need to sell him, he will be worth far more as a broke gelding than a stallion with undesirable looking legs. Good luck with him, it looks like you're off to a great start with him. :)
         

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