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Tips on the seat, posture etc, please (walk, jog, Western)

This is a discussion on Tips on the seat, posture etc, please (walk, jog, Western) within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        01-11-2014, 10:18 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    Not sure if someone mentioned this or not but when she is asking the horse to give she need to keep her arms in place. Right now she's bringing her whole arm back, it should be more subtle. However I like how she releases when the pony gives his/her face.
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        01-11-2014, 11:22 AM
      #12
    Yearling
    No matter what type of tack you are using, a balanced seat is a balanced seat. English saddle, western saddle, aussie saddle, no saddle - it makes no difference. A balanced seat means your body is in alignment so that your seat is independent of your hands and legs. In this position, you are able to give clear signals to your horse and stay out of her way. You are also in a position to stay as secure as possible should your horse make a sudden, unexpected movement.

    If you cannot achieve a balanced position in the saddle you are using I would venture a guess that the saddle does not fit you or, and this is more likely, it is a poorly made saddle.
         
        01-11-2014, 11:59 AM
      #13
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sahara    
    No matter what type of tack you are using, a balanced seat is a balanced seat. English saddle, western saddle, aussie saddle, no saddle - it makes no difference...
    I strongly disagree. There are a variety of seats, varying with tack and one's goal. Thus a jumper does not use the same seat at a cutter, because the tack and goal differ. A cutter who used the same approach as a jumper would not get a good or even decent performance out of his horse. A jumper using the approach of a cutter would be off balance for jumping. Neither uses the same approach as a barrel racer.

    English saddle tree:



    Western saddle tree:



    Since the tree is reasonably rigid, the ideal is to have your weight so the pressure is distributed evenly. But since they are different shapes, that can result in a different position.

    In addition to the tree itself, the 'ground' of a western saddle will influence the rider's position. I like a fairly flat western saddle seat:



    The western saddle my daughter likes is quite different:



    We ride with a different position in part because we like different saddles, and they just do not ride the same. And neither rides like my Australian saddle:



    And those 3 ride different from my English saddle:



    The saddle is an interface that distributes weight on the horse's back. They do not do so identically, and thus cannot be ridden balanced in an identical position.

    Further, riding is about motion, not sitting still. So the desired motion and behavior of the horse changes how you should ride. If your horse is likely to make sudden stops, your best position would not be a dressage position - but then, a horse who suddenly slams on the brakes without being asked won't do well in dressage. But if Mia notices a rattlesnake on our path, I'm quite happy to deal with HER deciding to put on the brakes. She can consult with me later...

    MY western saddle allows me a lot of freedom in leg placement. My daughter's allows none. Neither one distributes weight like an English saddle does, and neither allows the close contact with the lower leg than an English or even Australian design does.

    None is right or wrong, but they are different.

    http://www.rodnikkel.com/content/ind...oulder-blades/

    http://www.rodnikkel.com/content/ind...nglish-part-1/

    http://www.rodnikkel.com/content/ind...nglish-part-3/
         
        01-11-2014, 12:53 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    Getting back to THIS GIRL. And HER SEAT . . . .

    I do not see a real chair seat. She is actually about as well aligned as she can get in that saddle. It is much too big for her, and as Sky pointed out, does not seem to fit the horse either, judging by its flapping.

    Personally, I think your daughter has a great start and looks very good for so little time in the saddle. I think she would be more suited to English style riding. Her hands were pretty darn steady, but the instruction was telling here to pull back, and I have to disagree with that.

    She is over posting (too high) but I think it's mostly tat saddle. She might do better to drop the stirrups altogether.
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        01-11-2014, 02:06 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    Getting back to THIS GIRL. And HER SEAT . . . .

    I do not see a real chair seat. She is actually about as well aligned as she can get in that saddle. It is much too big for her, and as Sky pointed out, does not seem to fit the horse either, judging by its flapping.

    Personally, I think your daughter has a great start and looks very good for so little time in the saddle. I think she would be more suited to English style riding. Her hands were pretty darn steady, but the instruction was telling here to pull back, and I have to disagree with that.

    She is over posting (too high) but I think it's mostly tat saddle. She might do better to drop the stirrups altogether.
    Thanks, Tinyliny! I asked her and she says that some of the time she rides in a different saddle, which was the trainer's when she was a child, so I assume at least some of the time she has a better fit with the saddle.

    About the flapping--is it the saddle's fit, or the way it was put on?

    What makes you say that she's more suited to English riding? She wants to ride Western for now, and I find that the barn culture is much nicer in this barn than in the English barns here.

    What would you suggest she do with her arms instead of pulling them back? Why is she instructed to pull back? Why it is not a good thing?

    Thanks!
         
        01-11-2014, 08:54 PM
      #16
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horselessmom    
    About the flapping--is it the saddle's fit, or the way it was put on?

    What makes you say that she's more suited to English riding? She wants to ride Western for now, and I find that the barn culture is much nicer in this barn than in the English barns here.

    What would you suggest she do with her arms instead of pulling them back? Why is she instructed to pull back? Why it is not a good thing?

    Thanks!
    It's the fit... it flaps like that because it is not balanced on the horse. The back is actually sticking up, which likely means it's too narrow on the horse's shoulders.

    As for the pulling back, I think it's referring to the softening of the horse to bring it "into the bridle"

    Her way of teaching your daughter to do that is to pull her hands back.. instead of a different way (there are SO MANY ways of doing it, all with pluses and minuses... this is western so it's not my strong suit but one should never pull hands back towards belly button. It puts way too much pressure in the horse's mouth)
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        01-11-2014, 09:27 PM
      #17
    Super Moderator
    I think your daughter should ride where she enjoys it the most. I just thought she had a nice upright posture and good posting, but really, it should be all about having fun at this point. The horse is pretty nice, maintains a steady pace and seems to tolerate the saddle and the pull on the reins.

    Yeah , pulling the rein back toward you is incorrect. It is better to lift the rein upward, or to shorten your rein if you need to tighten it. But, honestly, she's doing fine.
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        01-12-2014, 03:40 PM
      #18
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    It's the fit... it flaps like that because it is not balanced on the horse. The back is actually sticking up, which likely means it's too narrow on the horse's shoulders.

    As for the pulling back, I think it's referring to the softening of the horse to bring it "into the bridle"

    Her way of teaching your daughter to do that is to pull her hands back.. instead of a different way (there are SO MANY ways of doing it, all with pluses and minuses... this is western so it's not my strong suit but one should never pull hands back towards belly button. It puts way too much pressure in the horse's mouth)
    Thanks! Daughter said that sometimes they use a different saddle. That's concerning that the saddle is not a good fit. I hope it isn't hurting the horse too much.

    So what you are saying, there are different ways to bring the horse into the bridle?


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    I think your daughter should ride where she enjoys it the most. I just thought she had a nice upright posture and good posting, but really, it should be all about having fun at this point. The horse is pretty nice, maintains a steady pace and seems to tolerate the saddle and the pull on the reins.

    Yeah , pulling the rein back toward you is incorrect. It is better to lift the rein upward, or to shorten your rein if you need to tighten it. But, honestly, she's doing fine.
    Thanks! She's having fun with absolutely anything where horses are involved, and she's wants to eventually be more serious about riding. The only obstacle is the money right now, she's as serious as it gets even now. She'll be riding twice a month bareback with another instructor starting in the spring, and also doing more groundwork, but having more saddle time at the current barn is not currently an option.

    So I want to be more aware of how she's being taught, as I don't want her to be solidifying something wrong.

    Are there any youtube videos you can recommend about doing it upwards? Could it be that lifting upwards is a bit more advanced and she's not being taught it yet?
         
        01-12-2014, 09:53 PM
      #19
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horselessmom    
    Thanks! Daughter said that sometimes they use a different saddle. That's concerning that the saddle is not a good fit. I hope it isn't hurting the horse too much.

    So what you are saying, there are different ways to bring the horse into the bridle?


    So I want to be more aware of how she's being taught, as I don't want her to be solidifying something wrong.

    Are there any youtube videos you can recommend about doing it upwards? Could it be that lifting upwards is a bit more advanced and she's not being taught it yet?
    Yes there are tons of different ways to bring the horses into the bridle, some better than others.
    horselessmom likes this.
         
        01-19-2014, 07:21 PM
      #20
    Foal
    I managed to get some of her loping on tape last week. I also watched more of her lesson and the other student *was* getting feedback on her seat and various reminders, like "heels down". The other student was more advanced / experienced and was riding a younger hose. So I think my daughter is not getting any feedback on her seat because the instructor wants her to focus on the steering right now. She does want to ask her instructor to give her more tips on her seat, so we will see how this goes.

    Any tips on her lopes are appreciated. Thanks.

         

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