Tips on the seat, posture etc, please (walk, jog, Western) - Page 3
 
 

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Tips on the seat, posture etc, please (walk, jog, Western)

This is a discussion on Tips on the seat, posture etc, please (walk, jog, Western) within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        01-19-2014, 08:54 PM
      #21
    Green Broke
    There is more than one way to skin a cat: based on what has been said, it sounds like equitation isn't the first thing she focuses on. And I think that's fair--learn the basics (steering, whoa, go, etcetera) first, and critique everything else once you're secure.
    horselessmom likes this.
         
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        01-20-2014, 02:17 AM
      #22
    Green Broke
    Is it just me, or does posting in a western saddle just seem awkward? If the student is truly wanting to learn western riding, then shouldn't she be sitting the trot?

    It just looks like a weird combination of english and western to me, for the girl to be riding with a slack rein (western) and then posting (english). If she's going to be posting, then it almost seems like she should be riding with more contact. And if she's going to be riding on a slack rein, she should be sitting the trot?
         
        01-20-2014, 02:32 AM
      #23
    Super Moderator
    Posting never looks wierd to me. It's just the easiest way to ride a trot, for both the hrose and the rider. Lots of working cowboys post the trot.
    smrobs, horselessmom and QHH like this.
         
        01-20-2014, 11:31 AM
      #24
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
    Is it just me, or does posting in a western saddle just seem awkward? If the student is truly wanting to learn western riding, then shouldn't she be sitting the trot?

    It just looks like a weird combination of english and western to me, for the girl to be riding with a slack rein (western) and then posting (english). If she's going to be posting, then it almost seems like she should be riding with more contact. And if she's going to be riding on a slack rein, she should be sitting the trot?
    They sit the trot in the lessons as well. They are taught both. As far as I understand, while posting is not appropriate in a Western *show*, it is usually taught in Western riding lessons.
    Skyseternalangel likes this.
         
        01-20-2014, 11:37 AM
      #25
    Showing
    Horselessmom, she looks to have a nice secure seat though she is leaning pretty far back. Does your daughter know how to do situps? That will help to strengthen her core so she can stay with the horse instead of leaning so far behind :)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
    Is it just me, or does posting in a western saddle just seem awkward? If the student is truly wanting to learn western riding, then shouldn't she be sitting the trot?

    It just looks like a weird combination of english and western to me, for the girl to be riding with a slack rein (western) and then posting (english). If she's going to be posting, then it almost seems like she should be riding with more contact. And if she's going to be riding on a slack rein, she should be sitting the trot?
    In short, no.

    Posting is how you save a horse's back, and the rider's body. You can post a trot forever but you cannot sit a trot forever. You'd find yourself fatigued, or your horse's back fatigued.

    Also it's a good thing to learn how to post, even if it's not "western" (which actually it is, as tinyliny alluded to ranchers post, endurance riders post [which is middle ground, but regardless]) because it makes you an all around rider.
    horselessmom likes this.
         
        01-20-2014, 12:02 PM
      #26
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    Horselessmom, she looks to have a nice secure seat though she is leaning pretty far back. Does your daughter know how to do situps? That will help to strengthen her core so she can stay with the horse instead of leaning so far behind :)



    In short, no.

    Posting is how you save a horse's back, and the rider's body. You can post a trot forever but you cannot sit a trot forever. You'd find yourself fatigued, or your horse's back fatigued.

    Also it's a good thing to learn how to post, even if it's not "western" (which actually it is, as tinyliny alluded to ranchers post, endurance riders post [which is middle ground, but regardless]) because it makes you an all around rider.
    Thanks!

    She was told to lean back and sit on her pockets when she started cantering, and she thinks this is how she's supposed to ride--no one has ever corrected this posture, other than me trying to gently suggest she doesn't lean back as much. But she knows I'm not a riding expert.

    Now as she's newly interested in the posture, I'll try again.
         
        01-20-2014, 12:07 PM
      #27
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
    Is it just me, or does posting in a western saddle just seem awkward?...
    Depends on the part of the country and the saddle design. There was a thread some years back on posting & western riding. Some parts of the country swore by posting in a western saddle, and other parts tended to swear at it.

    We have 2 western saddles that see regular use. The Circle Y my daughter likes places your thigh closer to horizontal. It is tough to post well in that saddle. When I've tried it, I had to give up any hope of a balanced post and use my legs more like diagonal shock absorbers. The Clinton Anderson/Martin saddle I'm using now allows me to move my leg where I want, so I can get my heels under my center of gravity and post (or ride two point) without a problem.

    When I took western lessons, I was not taught posting. The lady who gave my daughter lessons, an ex-barrel racer, did teach posting.

    However, because of the saddle design, my daughter looked very awkward. The angle of her thighs forced her to squeeze with her knees and thrust herself forward, which usually resulted in her heels going way back. In that saddle, and at her height, I don't think there was any other choice for her. I suspect she found it awkward too, because I almost never see her post any more - although she is taller now and can do a better job of it.

    From some years back:



    This was taken a couple of days ago. It was her own idea for how to practice cantering. Trooper dealt with it without a flicker...Mia would go ballistic if I tried it:



    But notice the angle of her thighs, and where the stirrups are hanging. That is just the way that saddle is - and she refuses to use any other saddle. She has briefly tried my Australian saddle and the English ones...they fit her better, but it isn't "her" I guess.

    But she is happy and Trooper considers her to be a minor deity, so who am I to complain?

    BTW - "on your pockets" is something I heard a lot of when I was taking western lessons. It is 'right' for the design of a western saddle, since the weight-distributing tree extends well behind the cantle. It isn't required for general purpose riding, and I always lean forward at a canter because I learned using English and Australian saddles, where the tree ends at the cantle. Leaning forward also feels better to me when my horse goes fast, and my mare doesn't really believe in a slow canter...

    FWIW, this is my favorite video on cantering in a western style:

         
        01-20-2014, 12:47 PM
      #28
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horselessmom    
    They sit the trot in the lessons as well. They are taught both. As far as I understand, while posting is not appropriate in a Western *show*, it is usually taught in Western riding lessons.
    Interesting guys! I have never known anyone who rides western to post. Well, I have a friend with an endurance saddle who posts, but I don't consider her riding "western" when she does that. She herself said she considers herself more of an english rider.

    I have never seen anyone riding in any western disciplines. (reining, cattle work, western pleasure, etc.) post.

    When someone wants to do riding across huge pastures or on the trail they can do whatever they feel is best.....and posting may be a part of that. But I never considered posting to be a part of western riding. It could be just me. Certainly I don't come from a show background and have had maybe 5 lessons in my whole life. I don't know how to post so I am always sitting the trot. But that is considered normal around here in a western saddle. It's probably a regional thing but I have never ever seen a western rider post.
    horselessmom likes this.
         
        01-20-2014, 12:52 PM
      #29
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    The Clinton Anderson/Martin saddle I'm using now allows me to move my leg where I want, so I can get my heels under my center of gravity and post (or ride two point) without a problem.
    I am a bit jealous of you finding that saddle second-hand! I have always been intrigued by it.

    So how do you like it now that you've had a chance to ride in it a bit? Does it feel "western" other than the freedom of leg movement (which is a nice thing)?
         
        01-20-2014, 01:28 PM
      #30
    Trained

    ^^Off topic but...I like it a lot. My family all think the seat is too hard, but I don't like a lot of padding (and it isn't a real "hard seat"). I can do what I like with my legs, so I can slide them forward when I want, or have them underneath me. It has a level seat, so I can move my rump around if I wish. The saddle my daughter uses has a sharp rise to the front of the seat...not a good idea for men, IMHO.

    More importantly, my mare does well in it. It is a bit too wide for her in the front, measured in a horizontal line, so I add a folded pony blanket (green in the picture) or the front half of a Wintec half-pad to it. It seems to free up her shoulders. From the first ride, she turns better in it than with my Australian-style saddle. And if I put my weight 'on my pockets', she doesn't care. She'll fast trot a mile with me sitting like that.

    I'm very happy with the quality of the saddle.

    I've always preferred a forward seat, and having lower leg contact is important in a forward seat. At first, this one seemed to prevent that - as with every other western saddle I've tried. But with a bit of adjustment in stirrup length, I can have contact with my calves. Not the way I can with an English saddle, but enough to make me comfortable.



    I guess the bottom line for me is that Mia seems to work better with it. I kind of prefer an English or Australian design, but I can switch to make her happier. That is not a slam of any sort on English saddles BTW...a mare we sold a few years back seemed happier in an English saddle than western, and I will probably continue to ride Mia in an English saddle at times for MY fun...but mostly western, for her.
         

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