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Yearling conformation critique

This is a discussion on Yearling conformation critique within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Will toeing out correct itself foal
  • Yearling colt toeing out

 
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    03-22-2009, 09:24 PM
  #11
Weanling
My farrier told me that its not uncommon for a foal to toe out usually with regular trimming it will correct itself or if it doesn't after several trims try corrective shoes.
Do you know if he has ever been trimmed? He does look like he really needs one
     
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    03-23-2009, 09:59 AM
  #12
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by close2prfct    
My farrier told me that its not uncommon for a foal to toe out usually with regular trimming it will correct itself or if it doesn't after several trims try corrective shoes.
Do you know if he has ever been trimmed? He does look like he really needs one
I don't know if he's been trimmed much less "regularly" trimmed. From the pictures he needs it badly as well as a deworming program from the looks of that pot belly.
     
    03-23-2009, 10:15 AM
  #13
Foal
Yearling Conformation

The problem that I see is that his cannon bones are not parallel. That is a separate issue from the toeing out. While you can probably fix the toeing out problem with regular hoof trimming, that will not straighten his legs in the vertical plane. That said, it is generally considered less of a problem if the lower legs are out from the upper legs than if the cannons are inside the upper leg; the difference is in where the stress is placed on the knee joints. I think it is still worth looking at the horse in person and observing his movement from the side, back and front. It's difficult to tell from a picture just how serious the problem is.
     
    03-23-2009, 06:21 PM
  #14
Foal
For such a little colt, he has a big stride which would be good for jumping.
     
    03-23-2009, 06:59 PM
  #15
Banned
I think it's worth a look. The toeing out you should be able to fix- my mini had to get trimming to fix his when he was 1 1/2 y/o.

He may have those problems, but all horses have problems. The question is the severity of the problems and how much they'll affect him in the future.

Right now, he looks decent enough to look at. But please please please don't just buy him because you have the new horse bug. Truly evaluate his legs and movement.

Good luck
Let us know
     
    03-23-2009, 10:10 PM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by girl_on_black_pony    
I think it's worth a look. The toeing out you should be able to fix- my mini had to get trimming to fix his when he was 1 1/2 y/o.

He may have those problems, but all horses have problems. The question is the severity of the problems and how much they'll affect him in the future.

Right now, he looks decent enough to look at. But please please please don't just buy him because you have the new horse bug. Truly evaluate his legs and movement.

Good luck
Let us know
Oh...my personality doesn't allow me just to buy stuff. I tend to over think everything and talk my way out of it. Besides Im going out of town on Easter weekend so I won't be buying anything until at least after that. I don't want to pay overnight board for the vacation for more than the horse I already own.
     
    03-24-2009, 06:13 PM
  #17
Banned
It's smart to really think about it. You never know, you might find something better
     
    03-25-2009, 07:37 PM
  #18
Started
It's almost impossible to accurately judge a yearling, since that's when they're in that fuzzy, awkward stage, but he is toed out. Other than that, you can't tell anything for sure yet. I would estimate that he would turn out mediocre at best, but you never know.
     
    03-26-2009, 06:02 PM
  #19
Foal
Ahg yearlings, hard to judge.....

And I'm really not willing to say one way or another about the legs. He needs a trim, he's a baby and may have stood up funny for the pictures, and he's a baby and might still change a bit. But unfortunately the legs are one of the most important things about his future, especially since he may be working hard and jumping. If you don't get a better feeling about the front legs in person, I think I would pass just on that alone...they take a lot of pounding on every landing.

Also, I don't really see the rest of him as being spectacular. Nice short back/long underline, good shoulder slope and wither. However, as lovely as that neck looks at this stage, as he grows up to mature, that neck is going to be short and thick, the throatlatch very thick. And while I think I like his hind leg angles fine right now, I'm not a fan of the hip...short and too steep for me.


But it's only 20 minutes, go and see for sure. Pictures can be deceiving.
     
    03-27-2009, 11:18 AM
  #20
Trained
Did you make it out to check out this munchkin yet?
     

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