Acting like a jerk at the end of a lesson temper tantrum or something else? - Page 3
   

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Acting like a jerk at the end of a lesson temper tantrum or something else?

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        10-09-2013, 12:30 AM
      #21
    Weanling
    Hello again, everyone. I've ridden I think four times since that lesson, and he's pulled the refusing-to-walk-on thing every time, but always half-heartedly, not like the major fit he threw last Wednesday. The first ride after the lesson, he did it pretty close to the beginning and I tried to get him to move on, but I didn't feel related to have the kind of fight I did with the trainer there (I've still never been on a horse when it reared, and I was nervous) so I got off, worked him on the lunge line and got back on. It went well after that.

    The other times he did it this week, all it took was a smack with the reins (they're soft reins — it didn't hurt him, just got his attention) and some firm steering and he gave up. I've been working on the things we did with the trainer but not for as long a session, and it's going well.

    I think it's just exactly what you all have said: he listens usually, but I don't have his full attention, so when there's a distraction, I lose him. I definitely feel like we're going to get through it, though.

    Another rider ( the owner if the horse I leased before I got Sam) said something that made sense, too. She said horses follow their leaders, so if you're riding and a horse tries to follow other horses out if the arena or focuses on anything but you, you're not the leader, and when you are, the horse looks to you for security and therefore would rather follow what you're asking than the other horses. As I've said, leadership is not natural for me, but I'm really hoping I can get there!
         
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        10-09-2013, 12:58 AM
      #22
    Trained
    He didn't rear, he did a temper pop. He was being a jerk because he saw other horses probably. Whatever the reason, it was corrected and part of training. Who cares why he did it, he needs to know he has to behave no matter what. I am sure my horse can come up with a million reasons to be a jerk, not one of them is tolerated.
         
        10-09-2013, 01:09 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    I know he didn't, but when his feet came off the ground it scared me, and I was worried he would rear. I know it's not a rational fear, but it makes me nervous.

    Anyway, I'm working on the "not tolerating" part ;)
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        10-09-2013, 06:50 PM
      #24
    Trained
    I am happy you are making progress, but one thing you said bothers me. It was the statement about the "reins are soft....." Please don't be afraid to smack him when he needs it because you are afraid to "hurt" him. Believe me-you cannot do anything close to what his friends do in the pasture. If he needs disciplining, do it like you mean it and be done. Don't be wimpy about it, since that gets no results and you end up pecking and nagging at them, thus making it worse.
         
        10-09-2013, 07:49 PM
      #25
    Showing
    Carry a riding crop and let him know what mamma's got.
         
        10-10-2013, 11:55 PM
      #26
    Weanling
    A couple of thoughts: the horse hasnt worked in two+ years, and is only about 2 months back to work (with a lameness...what kind??). It is generally accepted that any level of fitness does not come until 90s days. And with work in hand, this was more than 1.15 minutes. That's a lot (depending upon how much you were doing).

    Horses do not plot against the rider, they were do what they can within the perimeters we set. A trainer should no this. It the horse cuts the circle, the question is why: not enough energy, not in front of the leg, not turning properly off the aids. That is the rider's job to solve (with help of a teacher). It worries me that you are not talking of longer and shorter strides, but rather of speeds (which puts the horse onto the forehand if too quick). It is not about winning, but rather changing behavior patterns, and certainly the horse should not get blocked (or the contract dropped) which tends to allow the horse to go up.

    Certainly given his history, lameness is a possibility. But getting the horse in front of the leg is most important physically and psychologically.
         
        10-11-2013, 02:45 AM
      #27
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by equitate    
    A couple of thoughts: the horse hasnt worked in two+ years, and is only about 2 months back to work (with a lameness...what kind??). It is generally accepted that any level of fitness does not come until 90s days. And with work in hand, this was more than 1.15 minutes. That's a lot (depending upon how much you were doing).

    It had been almost an hour since the lesson started, so about 40 minutes with me in the saddle. We spent that time probably 2/3 walking and 1/3 trotting, maybe less trotting. No canter.

    I've had him almost three months now, and a month into it he was lame in his front right and the vet took X-rays and found arthritis. He's been on Cosequin ASU as suggested by the vet, and he hasn't shown lameness since (and I'm watching obsessively).


    Horses do not plot against the rider, they were do what they can within the perimeters we set. A trainer should no this.

    She does, and so do I. Neither of us thought he was pulling tricks, we just thought he decided he was done working and stopped working.

    It worries me that you are not talking of longer and shorter strides, but rather of speeds (which puts the horse onto the forehand if too quick).

    We were working on him giving to pressure and slowing when asked. The changes were not abrupt or drastic; I'd ask him to slow and give when he did.
    Anyway, I'm feeling good about everything. Today I carried a crop, and the one time he tried to back when I asked him forward, I tapped him with it (just a tap, although I was prepared to make it a smack if the 'tude continued) and he didn't try it again.

    I posted this original question right after that lesson, when I was really surprised by his behavior, but over the past week it's become pretty clear that I lose his attention and willingness when there's something more interesting going on. Before and after the foot-planting attempts, we've had a lovely time, and I already see a lot changing since we've been working with the trainer. I'm of course going to keep watching for pain, but for now this seems like exactly what most of you said, which we can deal with
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        10-11-2013, 04:56 AM
      #28
    Green Broke
    Glad to hear this!

    My lease horse decided to try something similair yesterday evening. His owner is a guy, who rides with spurs too. I weigh half, don't wear spurs and that was the fourth time under saddle. I asked politely once, then he got a whooping.

    All was well after that ;)
         
        10-11-2013, 05:18 PM
      #29
    Yearling
    Geldings can be divas too :) The one I ride lets me know when he's "unhappy" about something by pinning his ears and bucking occasionally. We just work through it. We always end on a good note so when he acts that way it just means the lesson is going to drag on until he decides to cooperate.
         

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