adopting a wild horse...
 
 

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adopting a wild horse...

This is a discussion on adopting a wild horse... within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        10-03-2008, 11:12 PM
      #1
    Weanling
    adopting a wild horse...

    I read about this program that adopts out wild horses, and I was like 'wow, that sounds interesting' so I was looking it up and the more I end up reading about it the more I want to try it...lol...maybe im crazy but it sounds really rewarding, I mean i've never trained a horse from scratch, i've had to start over and 'install' so to speak, new habits, but i've never trained actually started one, but that somehow doesnt bother me...hmmm...i don't think I have fallen off my horse so I think im thinking straight...
    What do you guys think?
    I've been told I have 'a way with animals' and im pretty sensible I can pretty much do anything I want to with my horse now...but he's started so...i don't know...and i've never done anything (with horses) that was wreckless and stupid unless I knew I would be ok, i've taken chances but not unless I was over 50% sure I wouldnt get bucked off...
    I think im talking in circles lol
    Anyway, has anyone adopted a wild horse? How did it go? Do you still have that horse? I have and urge to ask if it was easy but I know the answer to that is no...
    If you have never adopted a wild horse, what are your thoughts about it?
    Thanks guys!!! I know im a little hard to understand when I get confused or frustrated beacuse I type weird, my thoughts are jumping around up there like jellybeans lol
    *throws double chocolate chip cookie if you read this far and intend to post lol*
         
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        10-03-2008, 11:17 PM
      #2
    Green Broke
    I think starting out with a wild horse isn't a good idea if you don't have a lot of training experience. They can be very difficult to initially train. We got several from the BLM herd and each was different and none for a person without a lot of experience.

    They are wonderful horses though. Maybe you can get some experience working with horses from scratch and go from there.
         
        10-03-2008, 11:31 PM
      #3
    Green Broke
    I agree with the above post 100%. I didnt have any training experience when I bought my gelding, and I thought...eh I could read it in books and maybe find someone to help me. No it's a long tough frustrating road. I would suggest gaining a bit more experience in the training field before trying to gentle a stang. Good luck and best wishes.
         
        10-04-2008, 12:06 AM
      #4
    Weanling
    Yeah I totally agree with you guys that its probably too much for little me with no experiance..but where would I get the experiance?? All the horses around here are started and almost fully trained, I know a few people who could help but they have just about the same experiance as I do so that would be kind of...like trying to find a wooden needle in a haystack... :roll:
    I've been around untrained horses and rode a colt for his third time, but it was a short ride and I didnt even know until I got off like an hour later lol
    Well thanks for the hasty replies!! Lol
         
        10-04-2008, 12:13 AM
      #5
    Green Broke
    I would think about it a bit more and do some more research. Im not trying to discourage you, just that I've been there done that, except that my mustang was domestic bred with parents off the range. I sometimes wish I would have waited but then again, I love the experiences I've had with him. But as far as "gentling" a true untouched wild one.....i don't even know where I would begin.
         
        10-04-2008, 12:25 AM
      #6
    Weanling
    Yea im definitely going to do some more digging before I make any decision at all,

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by free_sprtd
    i sometimes wish I would have waited but then again, I love the experiences I've had with him.
    see you just said what I have been thinking, it may be tough and frustrating and maybe a little dangerous but what about the lessons learned and the experiances, the triumphs, the victories, and another life-time partner
    When I first got my horse he was a wreck and had no manners at all even on the ground and it cost me alot of brusies and hurt pride and dignity to get where I am now and still i've got a ways to go so I know its hard but geez I wouldnt give up the last year and a half for anything in the world...
    Lol im an optimist and I little crazy...it runs in the family lol
    Thanks again by the way, I know sometimes im a little hard to talk to
         
        10-04-2008, 01:11 AM
      #7
    Green Broke
    Nope I understand where you're coming from....you just have to try and work out your thoughts and we're here to help! :) im the same way
         
        10-04-2008, 01:21 AM
      #8
    Weanling
    Yea, I think im going to do alot of more research...then see where I am about april or march, we are planning on getting another horse anyway so why not a wild one?everything great takes time and patience...and if we play it right we may never have to have him/her shoe-d
         
        10-04-2008, 02:23 AM
      #9
    Green Broke
    A little dangerous can get you a lot dead. Wild horses aren't like untrained domestic horses. Some haven't seen people. It's not the same thing.

    Try and start with an untrained regular horse first. If you can tackle that, then go with a wild one later. You're asking for trouble to try and learn how to learn to train with a wild horse.

    My Grandpa had years and years of experience and some of them were a lot for even him to deal with.

    I definitely would discourage anyone in your position not to do it. It's not a negative thing, it's a reality thing.
         
        10-04-2008, 09:18 AM
      #10
    Showing
    Solon is giving you some great advise. There is a huge difference between starting with a yearling and starting with a Mustang. There is in fact no real similarity at all.

    As all the advise you've been given already, go in sequence. Start by working under a trainer, then a colt (or filly) of your own, then try to find someone who has worked with a Mustang before and learn from them. Take your time, you are dealing with a life and what you do with it will affect it for the rest of it's life.
         

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