bareback?
 
 

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bareback?

This is a discussion on bareback? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Which horses are easy to ride bareback
  • Does riding bareback tickle

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  • 1 Post By Back2Horseback

 
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    07-08-2012, 09:24 PM
  #1
Weanling
Question bareback?

I almost always rode bareback until I got my current mare, Wilma... Now I am riding in a western saddle.

Anyway, I have no clue if Wilma has ever been ridden bareback(she is 21 yrs, so I assume she must have been at one time or another)

My question is: Will a horse freak out if they are SUPER broke with a saddle and you jump on them bareback? It seems like a silly question but I rather be safe then sorry

Thanks
     
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    07-08-2012, 09:49 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Subbing. I have the same question as a mustang that I have been riding has been broke for over 5 years and I went to get on and he went crazy.. so whats the difference is my question...?
     
    07-08-2012, 09:55 PM
  #3
Weanling
An off track Standardbreds that I used for ride was so bumpy that no on dared to ride her bareback at a trot and only rarely walked bareback. She was also 17.1 and a had a mare attittude going on so hoping on her bareback wasn't easy. Out off all the lesson horses I have ridden and my mare, none had an issue being sat and cantered upon while bareback. The standardbred's only problem was that she was very sensitive without a saddle so you had to use more hand than leg. We were able to manage though.
     
    07-08-2012, 10:36 PM
  #4
Weanling
I'm not sure what the difference would be, but I was told once that on some horses it may bother their shoulders. Not sure I understand that. Maybe some are sensitive and it tickles? I have a horse that you could ride anywhere bareback and I've had one that completely freaked out. I wonder if one of those bareback pads would make a difference.
     
    07-09-2012, 07:40 AM
  #5
Yearling
From what I have been taught, one of the most uncomfortable ways for a horse to be ridden is bareback (relatively speaking--not considering obvious abusive issues like barbed wire bits, and other issues such as ill-fitting saddles, etc...), simply because the sensitive spine of the horse is making direct contact with the pelvis of the rider/even if the rider sits back somewhat to carry themselves more on their bum (read: western style seat, not forward hunt seat style?).

There is still direct pelvis to spine contact, which is basically bone-on-bone. When riding with your horse under saddle, the saddle acts to evenly distribute the riders weight across the dorsum of the horse in a balanced manner; something not possible when riding bareback. And with the ~2 inch clearance centered over the horse's spine, per correct saddle fitting, again, as I have been taught (when riding in english disciplines, anyway)...the saddle forms a protective "channel" or "bridge" over that most "pokey" of parts, to prevent that cause of discomfort or rubbing/pressure.

Some less sensitive horses may have no difficulty tolerating the position/contact of rider to horse directly upon their spine whatsoever, especially horses which have a bit less of a sharp wither/spine/etc...and those being ridden by someone who is neither tremendously overweight nor especially bony, as this more middle-of-the-road-sized-person can be helpful when riding bareback. Unless EITHER the rider's mount is a draft/draft cross, with a wide dorsum to distribute the boneyness or the additional weightyness--in that case, it is fairly comfortable for horse and rider, regardless of rider size or configuration. This type of horse tends to feel minimal sensitivity regardless, and cause minimal sensitivity for the the rider, as well.

I spent nearly a year riding a pony for a friend of mine, and rode her bareback nearly all the time, so despite all comments made above, I am by NO MEANS against bareback riding, and find it can be some of the most fun and "clean", real riding ever done...I also believe that time spent riding bareback did more for my seat and such than any of the other 16+ years of riding I did!...This pony was a "fluffy" pony, no sharp ANYTHING on her! And we often used at least a bareback pad, so despite the fact that it "can" be difficult on certain horses, overall, I believe if one can adjust their seat to making the least "uncomfortable" contact with the more sensitive bony spinal portions, as well as going slowly with the horse when introducing the concept to the more "sensitive" types, it can be made into a totally pleasant and wonderful experience for horse and rider alike!

Just my $.02 Hope that helps a bit?
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