Bareback pads get a bad wrap...but this one? - Page 3
 
 

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Bareback pads get a bad wrap...but this one?

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  • Modifying a cashel saddle
  • Negative review little joe bareback saddles

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    01-05-2014, 10:55 AM
  #21
Yearling
^^^That looks like a happy horse! Is she smiling?

Nice work, OP!
     
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    01-05-2014, 11:06 AM
  #22
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by homesteadhorses    
your post made me remember a ad I saw on ebay looking at saddles...treeless.. I heard that word often when it can to looking up if "bareback pads" are safe, which the mean answer leading to "no because its treeless."

Check this ebay add out, I know its CHEAP, its from India and would take over 2 months for it to get here, but is it worth a shot? I have very rarely rode English (western 99% of the time) but am really just looking for something with stirrups, am not going to be doing any crazy riding, just around our own farm. Hour or less.

Give me your review.

YESRD Quality Synthetic English Treeless Horse Saddle Many Colors | eBay
I know someone who got a saddle that either looked like the Kimberly one posted above or the one in your link. Someone had given it to her and she passed it on to me. I looked it over, and honestly, it's utter junk. It wouldn't even have looked that great on my horse who had had a treeless saddle until he lost weight. I ended up giving it to another gal at the barn who has a two year old filly, not to ride her in, but to start getting her used to the feel and weight of a saddle.

I wouldn't have put it on my horse and sat in it.

If you absolutely wanted a "bareback pad" with stirrups, get a Cashel Soft Saddle. Rode in one once and it was thick and comfy at least to walk around in. Their new version seems to look better than the old one and it's under $300.

Cashel Company: SOFT SADDLE G2
     
    01-05-2014, 11:12 AM
  #23
Foal
I like the Little Joe bareback saddle. It doesn't slip unless you're leaning way into one side or the other. I mount often from the ground so I know!! Here's the link to the website, actually their saddle pads but it has a nice picture of the bareback saddle.

Saddle blankets: innovative, horse-contoured designs from LittleJoe
     
    01-05-2014, 11:13 AM
  #24
Green Broke
A bareback pad, in my mind/opinion, is for the rider's comfort. To me, that's neither here nor there.

Unless it has stirrups. That's a no no, and can make for an ouchy back.
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    01-05-2014, 01:16 PM
  #25
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by homesteadhorses    
ok so I really want to ride one day ((i used to ride/work with horses) I just saved this 20 year old mare, she as sweet as can be, I have been told she is a wonderful ride, however she is 200 pounds underweight, so I have TIME to shop around, the cost of a saddle is CRAZY so I looked into "bareback pads" I know I know. They get a really bad wrap, but this one brand I noticed is very highly rated. Much more then all the others. Give me a idea on what you think.




I'm not going to read pages of comments so sorry if I'm repeating something.

The problem you have a bareback pads is the same problem you have with riding bareback.
Riding bareback means tuberosity (yes, that's a real name ) of your ischium bone is concentrating all the weight of your body distributed at two small places (under the tuberosity) on the horse's back.
A pad does not eliminate this. All it does is put more cushioning between the bone and the back, but doesn't not redistribute the weight so the pressure (padded now) still bares down where the bones are above the back.
That is the reason why (long, long ago in a place far, far away) they invented the saddle "tree". The problem of horses being out of action as a result of sore backs plagued campaigning militaries for a long time. All the major military powers that used mounted troops experimented with going without saddles, treeless saddles, and anything someone could think of to cut down on the number of horses unfit for duty due to the need for their back to recover.
A properly fitting tree solves the problem, but for the militaries that was a hit and miss deal. The cost of getting a correct fit for every horse just wasn't practical. So you have a few basic sizes and used the closest one.
The Hungarian and German Cav came up with a new design a few hundred years ago (today the English speaking world calls it the "English" saddle for reason the I'll never understand) that they thought would be the answer. It was light, easier to fit and most importantly gave their cav greater mobility of action than the previous styles. Problems solved, right? Well, not quite. Once these armies left the confines on home where they only rode for a few hours a week and had to ride all day for days on end it was discovered that this (then) new saddle's tree did not displace the weight of the rider and gear over a wide enough area (that whole point of having a saddle tree) and once again they have the problem of dealing with a large % of horses unfit for duty from sore backs.
Around the mid 1800's enter some bright young British officer(s) who took on the problem of designing a saddle that would cut down on this problem.
Surprisingly the result was the best solution (to date even) for a mounted military. It became known as the Universal Pattern (UP). The tree displaced more weight. They still came in a small selection of sizes, but a trained person could modify the tree slightly for a better fit (has to do with using metal for the pommel and cantle). Still not an answer making the bar twist perfect, but certainly better than what had been available.

That saddle is still used to today by mounted military and constabularies in most of the English speaking countries (US being an exception).
They make a civilian version of this saddle called the Trooper.

Sorry, it's like teaching a class....you end up giving way more information than what is needed

Bareback pads will always have a bad rap, because they will always fail to displace the riders weight and still allow the weight to be focused on two relative small points.
That's not to say that if you ride a few hours a week that your horse will end up with a sore back. You can ride bareback with or without a pad for a few hours a week and not take your horse out of action. But don't use a pad as a replacement for a saddle. Serious riding like someone who spends most of their week on a horse for most of the day will need a saddle with a well fitted tree that displaces the weight over as large an area as possible.
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    01-05-2014, 02:22 PM
  #26
Teen Forum Moderator
I would absolutely not buy a cheap saddle. Like I said, just hold off on riding and pitch $50...or whatever you can afford, a month, into savings for a saddle. In a few months you'll have enough for a decent one, and your horse will be in good enough shape for one.
     
    01-05-2014, 02:24 PM
  #27
Weanling
I have a Best Friends bareback pad which I am very happy with. I used to use it a lot more when I went on short trail rides (less than an hour) 3-4 times a week. My mare always did fine with it and I noticed a big improvement in my balance. The pad just adds some cushioning and keeps your pants cleaner. I don't see why it would be a problem to use; just don't get one with stirrups, keep your bareback rides short and easy, and see how she does with it. :)
     
    01-05-2014, 03:48 PM
  #28
Showing
I'd work her on the ground before getting on her back to build what little muscle she may have AND allow her to gain weight.
     
    01-05-2014, 05:43 PM
  #29
Green Broke
Another vote for Best Friend bareback pads I have the Western style pad and love it.

Another option that I ran across the other day (but have no personal experience with) is something like this: Total Contact Revolutionary Saddlery Solutions It's essentially a surcingle with stirrup bars built in. Seems a bit expensive for what it is, but interesting, nonetheless.
     
    01-05-2014, 07:13 PM
  #30
Showing
People have ridden bareback for years and I've never heard of a horse getting a sore back from this, a saddle yes but not bareback, with or without a pad.
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