Becoming The Best Competitive Rider You Can.
   

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Becoming The Best Competitive Rider You Can.

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  • How to become a competitive rider
  • Becoming a competitive rider

 
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    01-20-2010, 12:41 AM
  #1
Green Broke
Becoming The Best Competitive Rider You Can.

Hey.

So resently I've managed to get a good instructor and a trailer, so now I can go to shows. Chances are, if possible I will be competing every weekend.. this means that of a week, I would only have five days to train for shows. I have also just started high school, so this means I have projects, home work, school, ect to do. So I would like to know how you guys cope with things like that?
     
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    01-20-2010, 12:50 AM
  #2
Yearling
Maddie, seriously they might say to you high-school is super dooper hard but if you remain relatively orgainised its not. I promise you that. Go to school, pay attention, keep a diary of when all the projects are due and you'll be fine. For some shows, you will most likely end up having the Friday off to prepare for it so that's an added bonus of showing :)

The key to really suceeding is being organised, having support and believing in yourself. Remember, don't get too stressed. I know you're a smart girl, so you'll be fine. Showing is great, and you'll be fine with your school work.
     
    01-20-2010, 04:34 AM
  #3
Bek
Foal
I agree with Gidji, organisation is so important. Last year I was in year 11 and was still able to ride every school afternoon and get all my school work done. I have a timetable of when I'm going to ride and when I'm going to get my school stuff done. Some days I had to get up a bit earlier to get some assignments done so that I could still ride that afternoon. I hate getting up early, but if it meant I could ride my horses as well, it was worth it.
     
    01-20-2010, 04:52 AM
  #4
Trained
When I did year 12 I was getting up at 5am to ride, then go to school, come home, feed up, and do homework. The biggest thing is to stay on top of your school work. School DOES come before horses, I know it sounds like your parents I bet, and I always thought horses were the most important thing, but you have many many years ahead of you to play with horses, and only one real shot at getting it right at school. Doing well at school will set you up for life, allowing you to live the life you want to and have horses!

Its no biggy at all trying to juggle school up to year 11 and horses. You have plenty of time, once you get into a routine it will all fall into place. You just need to structure your life a little more than what it may be now.

Once you get out into the work force, you have even LESS time!

As for competing every weekend, I think that is going to be difficult. Maybe aim for once a month or maybe once a fortnight. Just because you have a float and coach doesn't mean you need to go out every weekend ;) Horses get sore and tired competing, and need a couple of days off after a competition, it's best to compete once maybe twice a month if you really have to. When I'm actively competing, I will only go out once a month, and then in the lead up to a big event such as a state championships I'll try to get out twice a month.
     
    01-20-2010, 06:34 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Thank you all. I think high school is a bit of a shock to me. Exspecially with wanting to be a vet, I would like high grades from grade eight. So I don't suddenly get to grade 10 and be like OMG sudden grade lift, type thing. All those people who say high school isn't hard, no your average high school isn't and I hope and truly don't mean for this to come out stuck up BUT my high school is a private girls school AND is the best high school in my state. Plus I think its one of the top high schools in Aus. I've seen the PILES of home work my sister brings home daily, she is very organized although like me she is doing her sport at least 5 days a week (shes a sailor). Although I am in a place where I reall can't take a week off, for several reasons. One being I go nuts .... the other being no matter how quite my horse is, you leave him for a week, he is nuts. Maybe not nuts, but his at a place in his training, where it feels like you leave him for a while he just goes silly and forgets what I've taught him. Making things very difficult.

I also might be possibly working a friends horse for them, PLUS I'm doing four lessons a week :)
     
    01-20-2010, 11:48 AM
  #6
Yearling
Work doesn't equate to 'hard'. It's just work.

I took several college courses my high school years whilst showing/running track. Don't worry too much about it, just stay on top of your work--ESPECIALLY your sciences. There is a LOT of chemistry/biology/etc. when you get into pre-vet school, and you CAN NOT fail these classes. You can't even get a B, really. Vet schools are quite possibly the hardest to get into in the country. You need exceptional grades in college, especially in your sciences.

Not saying it to scare you, but just pay extra attention in those areas and strive to shine there.

I'm sure I'm not going to be the only one who says this, but enjoy your four years while you can. ;) It doesn't hold a candle to having a physical, full-time job and trying to train AND show competitively!
     
    01-20-2010, 03:53 PM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
As for competing every weekend, I think that is going to be difficult. Maybe aim for once a month or maybe once a fortnight. Just because you have a float and coach doesn't mean you need to go out every weekend ;) Horses get sore and tired competing, and need a couple of days off after a competition, it's best to compete once maybe twice a month if you really have to. When I'm actively competing, I will only go out once a month, and then in the lead up to a big event such as a state championships I'll try to get out twice a month.
I compete nearly every weekend. My horses get the Monday off afterwards and sometimes the Tuesday as well. They are only trail ridden during the week for light conditioning, and don't have any soreness issues. In October I have 4 big, three day, long distance away competitions in a row. As long as you manage your horses well, it isn't a problem.
     
    01-20-2010, 05:19 PM
  #8
Trained
Doesn't matter which high school you go to, if YOU want to do well, then there IS going to be alot of work. There are two ways to go about high school, there's the people who slack off, don't care about their grades and cruise through no problems at all. Then there are those who are desperate to get good grades, work their backsides off and put every bit of effort into getting the best possible mark on every piece of work handed in for marking.
I worked my backside off and did alright. Originally I was aiming to get into vet science, however after going to a lecture about the course, I was put off. You have to be in it 100% for the love of it, the money is pretty average, you are studying 6 years full time with a huge emphasis on physics and chemistry. Then at the end of it, there's not that many job offers.
I decided to change my preference to animal science, which is similar to vet but it's more of a research bases subject, and after the first year you can try to jump across to vet science anyway if you feel so inclined. The TER for animal science is only 80 in universities here, not sure what it in interstate though, but I think your best bet if you REALLY want to be a vet, is to aim for vet science marks through school (vet sci. TER when I went through year 12 was from memory about 96. So that is almost perfect scores in every subject and you MUST have physics, chemistry, english studies and high level maths) and put animal science down as your second preference, then plain bachelor of science in case you don't get into either ;)
I had a GAP year (which I HIGHLY recomenend!! If you are someone that has strong goals, it is a great idea, you build up some funds, get life experience and get a cruddy supermarket job or similar to make you realise how important going back to study is! I had two receptionist jobs and one checkout job all at once, and I can't wait to get to Uni!) and decided to change my course again. Animal science doesnt offer a hell of a lot of jobs, and so I changed to agricutural science, but had second thoughts and swapped again, to environmental management. Best decision I could have made, 95% of graduates get a job before the end of their 3rd year and the average pay for a first year is VERY nice :P

Sorry for the uni talk haha! I had a 3 year old off the track tb mare when I was doing year 12, as well as working another tb for a lady and competing him. The first half of the year wasn't too bad, but the heat picked up towards the middle of term 3 and I decided to rest my mare out in the paddock until I finished exams. I didn't think I'd be able to cope without riding for a few months, but hounestly, it was the best decision I could have made. I was so much more focussed on my school work and knew that I had a horse sitting there waiting for me at the end of it. And no, she didn't forget everything that she'd been taught. You just need to jog their memory a little.
Unless your horse is a top competition horse and you're an elite rider, putting him out into the paddock for a couple of months isn't going to hurt either of you.
I've now gone 9 months without riding and am absolutely hating it, just cannot find the right horse for me, so really, 3 or 4 months is nothing ;)
     
    01-20-2010, 05:37 PM
  #9
Weanling
Honestly, schedule yourself a study period during the school day. I hardly ever do homework because of my study period and yes, I am in all A and honors level courses. I too, was also aiming for vet (surgeon actually), but got turned off by the idea of 8 years of college and another 2-4 years internship. I decided to get a 4 year pre-vet degree and try for a job as a vet tech instead. It took a lot of pressure off of me, and the pay is still good. You have to REALLY want it to go to med school, and for me, I know I wouldn't be happy at all to spend my entire young life in a school.

As far as riding goes, what actually stops me the most is the fact that I don't have an indoor so winter is touch and go. BTW, I am sooo jealous of your 4 lessons a week!
     
    01-20-2010, 05:56 PM
  #10
Weanling
Universities only look at grade 12 courses (my school encourages us to try extra hard in grade 11 just in case.) Im not saying slack off or anything just don't stress about grade 9/10 classes. The most important thing to do in grade 9/10/11 classes is to keep your options as open as possibe. Its better to be getting a 60% in a university/academic class than it is to be getting 90% in college. And take all the science and math courses you can.
I as well have thought about vet school but like the others said its a big commintment, its harder than becoming a doctor because doctors only learn about one species you learn several. But you may love it. If you find after a couple years of highschool your not liking the sciences in may not be in your best intrest because you have to take all sciences.

Anywho, I have no problem balancing everything, just make the best of your class time. Lunch is also great too.
     

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