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This is a discussion on Beginner within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        11-19-2010, 09:42 PM
      #11
    Super Moderator
    Hi Cowgirl,

    You got some really good answers. The other posts were just marelous and said everything I was thinking of saying.
    (and yes, you do need to edit your posts to be sure that they are understandable. A few spelling errors are fine, but the message needs to be clear.)

    Anyway, about becoming a better horseperson, I just wanted to add that you have already demonstrated the first requirement; wanting to learn more. So, keep an open mind and look to learn from whereever it may come. Ask questions when you can and let people show you things. You don't have to agree with them, but if you already think you know something you will have a closed mind and miss some good tidbit.

    When I started taking dressage I had no idea what dressage even was. Never had even heard the word, "dressage". But I wanted to find someone who would just teach me good riding and harmony with the horse. So, that's how I felt when I went looking for an instructor. And the woman I ended up with , who taught me the foundation of dressage, though sometimes a royal b****tch, came from a place where the horse and his welfare are number 1, and that should be your number one prerequisite when YOU go looking for your instructor.

    Now, as for a lead. At the canter the horse has a three phase stride.
    To begin the canter, he starts on one rear foot. Let's say he starts on his right rear foot. That's phase one. Next he steps forward on his left rear and right front foot at exactly the same time ; phase two, and lastly, he reaches forward with his LEFT front foot, which is called his leading foot because it reaches a little farther in front of the other front foot. You know how a canter sounds like, "one , two ,threee .. one, two, three, . . One , two , three .. etc.) The "three" step is the leading step. After that step the horse has a moment of suspension where NO legs are touching the ground before the whole cycle starts over again.
    When you canter to the left, you want the horse to be on the LEFT lead, for his balance. So, he needs to strike off with his right rear leg.
    And for the right lead, it's the opposite.
         
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        11-20-2010, 12:08 AM
      #12
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    Hi Cowgirl,

    You got some really good answers. The other posts were just marelous and said everything I was thinking of saying.
    (and yes, you do need to edit your posts to be sure that they are understandable. A few spelling errors are fine, but the message needs to be clear.)

    Anyway, about becoming a better horseperson, I just wanted to add that you have already demonstrated the first requirement; wanting to learn more. So, keep an open mind and look to learn from whereever it may come. Ask questions when you can and let people show you things. You don't have to agree with them, but if you already think you know something you will have a closed mind and miss some good tidbit.

    When I started taking dressage I had no idea what dressage even was. Never had even heard the word, "dressage". But I wanted to find someone who would just teach me good riding and harmony with the horse. So, that's how I felt when I went looking for an instructor. And the woman I ended up with , who taught me the foundation of dressage, though sometimes a royal b****tch, came from a place where the horse and his welfare are number 1, and that should be your number one prerequisite when YOU go looking for your instructor.

    Now, as for a lead. At the canter the horse has a three phase stride.
    To begin the canter, he starts on one rear foot. Let's say he starts on his right rear foot. That's phase one. Next he steps forward on his left rear and right front foot at exactly the same time ; phase two, and lastly, he reaches forward with his LEFT front foot, which is called his leading foot because it reaches a little farther in front of the other front foot. You know how a canter sounds like, "one , two ,threee .. one, two, three, . . One , two , three .. etc.) The "three" step is the leading step. After that step the horse has a moment of suspension where NO legs are touching the ground before the whole cycle starts over again.
    When you canter to the left, you want the horse to be on the LEFT lead, for his balance. So, he needs to strike off with his right rear leg.
    And for the right lead, it's the opposite.
    Thanks!
    So if he starts with a right step it's left lead?
    If he starts with a left step it's a right lead?

    Can you do english riding bareback?
         
        11-20-2010, 01:08 AM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    Correct, if the first step, with rear leg is the left rear, then he will be on a RIGHT lead, and vice versa.

    As for riding bareback, well you go girl! You can do ANYTHING bareback, except maybe jousting. YOu will have such a good seat.
    I don't ride bareback anymore but I really should. I was thinking about trying it on Mac, but when I rode him out today, he did one of his legendary quick 180 degree spins in a microsecond. If I had been bareback, I would have been on the ground. Now, a good bareback rider can deal with that. But I accept my age and my limitations and try to stay realistic.
         
        11-20-2010, 01:58 AM
      #14
    Green Broke
    You can ride bareback but your weight isn't distributed evenly across the horses back, which can cause a lot of pressure over a small area. For this reason it is often recommended that you do not ride bareback too much.

    A lot of English is just general control of the horse and acceptance of the bit. While you can practice some of that bareback ensure that you have steady hands, because many people tend to use their hands for balance when riding bareback, and it hurts their mouth.

    Also, if you want to ride English and maintain a contact I do not think that any of those bits are appropriate. For a beginner the best bit is a snaffle bit, maybe with two links. I always use loose ring double jointed snaffles, but there are a wide variety of suitable bits for English.
         
        11-20-2010, 03:01 AM
      #15
    Weanling
    Cowgirl101 - is English your second language?

    Here's a video of someone explaining canter leads... would be nice to have some visuals but this is the best I could find!


    Hope it helps. Good luck!
         
        11-20-2010, 01:27 PM
      #16
    Foal
    The others have alot of good things to say, but I have one thing to add. Please don't take this the wrong way.

    You seem to put way too much emphasis on the words "beginner", "advanced", etc. You label all your horses as such and keep asking how you can become "advanced". Instead of asking how to become an advanced rider, focus on riding your horse correctly everytime. That will build up your muscles so that you can take on more challenges. Search for exercises to do, like patterns and gymnastics. Advanced riders are considered advanced not because they can do certain things but because they can get the horse to do things and do them well.

    If you don't have access to a real trainer, becoming a better rider will be difficult. You have no way of knowing if your position is correct or if you are in some way inadvertently giving your horse conflicting signals. If you can have someone video you and then put it on here to critique, that will help you some. There are a couple sites that I like- statelinetack.com has some good videos and juliegoodnight.com. A great book to learn from is Sally Swift's Centered Riding.
         
        11-20-2010, 05:53 PM
      #17
    Banned
    Thanks everyone!

    Today I went to my friend's they got a white pony, I hoped on for five minutes.. She was a good little pony, cute too.
    I know short rides won't go far. I so horse crazy, I had to hope on. Next time I ride I'll post photo for feedback..
         
        11-22-2010, 10:32 PM
      #18
    Yearling
    May I also suggest another book...The Complete Training of Horse and Rider by Alois Podhajsky
    Of course nothing replaces working with an instructor but reading , watching videos, attending clinics etc..and lots of practice will give you a good start and basic understanding of the horse, riding , and exploring your options as to where you want to take this knowledge. Learning about horses is a life long journey. While you are on this journey you may find good instructors and not so good instructors but believe it or not , you can still learn things from poor riding instructors . Good luck and enjoy your journey.
         
        11-23-2010, 02:49 PM
      #19
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RadHenry09    
    May I also suggest another book...The Complete Training of Horse and Rider by Alois Podhajsky
    Of course nothing replaces working with an instructor but reading , watching videos, attending clinics etc..and lots of practice will give you a good start and basic understanding of the horse, riding , and exploring your options as to where you want to take this knowledge. Learning about horses is a life long journey. While you are on this journey you may find good instructors and not so good instructors but believe it or not , you can still learn things from poor riding instructors . Good luck and enjoy your journey.
    I know a lot of basic. It's okay to ask what I know or don't.
    But with horses you can't even know it all, you can always learn.
    When I get my photos of my riding, I'll post them.
         
        11-23-2010, 03:11 PM
      #20
    Banned
    Not trying to be rude but I would think it would be detrimental to a horses training if you didn't even know what a lead is, before I even started cantering my instructor taught me leads, before I started trotting I was taught to post/diagnals and before jumping I was taught jump position over poles. Not saying your not doing a good job because I don't know it just kind of seems backwards to be learning the correct way of doing things after you've already been riding. And I totally understand if you can't find and instructor so Books and videos would probably help a lot.. Probably videos more so.
    Heres a video I found of leads that might help :)
    Getting the Correct Canter Lead - Bing Videos
         

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