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best boots with steel toe

This is a discussion on best boots with steel toe within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Steel capped boots causing toenail problems
  • Steel toe heated boots

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    11-06-2012, 10:00 PM
  #21
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
Steel toed footware do not cause ingrown toenails. You'd have to be wearing footware that is waaaaay too small.
Haha nope! My boots are always a litter bigger because I have NO arch whatsoever......so it's not the size for me, but size does play not ingrown toe nails for sure. What it is is the stirrup pressure on your boot and where your toes are pushing into the boot.....so after having the podiatrist cut portions of my toenails off while I sat there and watched him needle my toes, I will never ride in steel toes again because they have no flexibility if your toe is pushed up against the steel cap.
     
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    11-07-2012, 06:24 PM
  #22
Trained
EvilHoD: Severing -- better that than no foot at all. But, even so, the odds of something falling just that right way to bend the edge and not have the cap of the toe take the biggest part of the impact and roll off your toe has got to be extremely small. I've been around these things almost my whole life and never, ever heard of this happening. So, not saying it's impossible, just incredibly unlikely. And, as you say, if they are crappy boots than maybe the steel isn't bent properly to encourage the front or side roll, or the steel is crappy steel.

MuppetGirl: Ingrown toenails -- I would never ride with steel toed boots, only because my toes would get too cold, but how in blazes do you end up with your toes jammed up there so much and so often that you are pushing on your toenails? It may as well be that the boots are too small -- same effect. You'd have problems with most any boot at that. I have slightly deformed toes from wearing too small footwear as a child actually.

I will continue to wear my steel toed boots and runners when I'm working around things that go bump and things that cut. I guess I have the steel toed bug like others have the helmet bug! :)
     
    11-07-2012, 06:54 PM
  #23
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
EvilHoD: Severing -- better that than no foot at all. But, even so, the odds of something falling just that right way to bend the edge and not have the cap of the toe take the biggest part of the impact and roll off your toe has got to be extremely small. I've been around these things almost my whole life and never, ever heard of this happening. So, not saying it's impossible, just incredibly unlikely. And, as you say, if they are crappy boots than maybe the steel isn't bent properly to encourage the front or side roll, or the steel is crappy
I think we're in agreement here severing is definitely better than crushing which is why I wear steel toed boots in the workshop - having heavy stuff dropped on one's toes is nasty! But with a horse I've had them jump on me before in normal boots and I didn't so much as get a broken toe and, not knowing the quality of the steel in my work boots, I'd pick a sore foot over a cut when dealing with horses, especially as the pressure is generally momentary, unlike when 400kg of stone decides to land on your foot (growling at blocks of marble doesn't seem to work ).
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    11-07-2012, 07:15 PM
  #24
Yearling
I've wanted a pair of steel boots, but I HATE all of the ones I've tried on. The whole boot/shoe is nice and snug, and then the steel toe is like a big cavern for my foot, my toes just wiggle around in there. No. If my shoe is going to be snug the toes need to be too. If I could find a good pair that was snug on my foot (As much as steel can be) then that would be WONDERFUL. (And ideas? Anyone?)
     
    11-07-2012, 08:04 PM
  #25
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
I think we're in agreement here severing is definitely better than crushing which is why I wear steel toed boots in the workshop - having heavy stuff dropped on one's toes is nasty! But with a horse I've had them jump on me before in normal boots and I didn't so much as get a broken toe and, not knowing the quality of the steel in my work boots, I'd pick a sore foot over a cut when dealing with horses, especially as the pressure is generally momentary, unlike when 400kg of stone decides to land on your foot (growling at blocks of marble doesn't seem to work ).
See, so the activity in the horse world is not going to cause the steel to bend and cut off your toes, but could prevent a broken toe. I had a weanling step on my toe and break it. (I wasn't expecting to be working with animals that day, so not prepared.) It's all in how they land and how much PSI there is! Those little weanling feet are tiny!
     
    11-07-2012, 08:06 PM
  #26
Trained
Shoebox, I've never seen a "snug" steel toe. Generally, that's not something you would want. Also, the best socks to wear with steel toes are wool socks. That will give a big of fill for your toe area.

It gets cold in Minnesota,too -- surely you don't wear snug boots in the winter? You'd freeze your tootsies!
     
    11-07-2012, 08:14 PM
  #27
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
Shoebox, I've never seen a "snug" steel toe. Generally, that's not something you would want. Also, the best socks to wear with steel toes are wool socks. That will give a big of fill for your toe area.

It gets cold in Minnesota,too -- surely you don't wear snug boots in the winter? You'd freeze your tootsies!
My boots are moderately snug. Snug enough that I can wear them either with my normal socks or a nice thick pair of wool socks. Why would snugness make my feet colder? (Not snug as in too small, just snug as in fitting well against my foot.) That being said, my feet do occasionally still get cold... I just attributed that to it being Minnesota and freezing. Should I get boots that are big on me?

And if that's the case on the steel toes, there isn't any way I could handle them! I'll stick with my riding boots. Been stepped on once in those and my foot came out of it just fine.
     
    11-07-2012, 08:25 PM
  #28
Trained
What keeps your feet warm is not the sock, but the air layers in between the threads and layers. If your boots are snug, they crush the socks, hence crushing the air layers that you need to keep your feet warm. My rule of thumb for all my winter footware, whether riding, walking, skiing or skating, is that I should easily be able to wiggle my toes with my two pairs of socks on. If I touch the top or front of the shoe/boot, it's too small.
     
    11-07-2012, 09:01 PM
  #29
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
EvilHoD: Severing -- better that than no foot at all. But, even so, the odds of something falling just that right way to bend the edge and not have the cap of the toe take the biggest part of the impact and roll off your toe has got to be extremely small. I've been around these things almost my whole life and never, ever heard of this happening. So, not saying it's impossible, just incredibly unlikely. And, as you say, if they are crappy boots than maybe the steel isn't bent properly to encourage the front or side roll, or the steel is crappy steel.

MuppetGirl: Ingrown toenails -- I would never ride with steel toed boots, only because my toes would get too cold, but how in blazes do you end up with your toes jammed up there so much and so often that you are pushing on your toenails? It may as well be that the boots are too small -- same effect. You'd have problems with most any boot at that. I have slightly deformed toes from wearing too small footwear as a child actually.

I will continue to wear my steel toed boots and runners when I'm working around things that go bump and things that cut. I guess I have the steel toed bug like others have the helmet bug! :)
Haha cold toes.....I know about that! When I got the ingrown toenails was after riding for a while in an indoor (so heated, no cold toes) and using a lot of heel down riding, reining for that matter. BUT on top of that, I also run, but I get shin sore, and now I've figured out why (thanks DR Oz) my muscles running across shins and my calves are tight and my big toe points up and my shins get sore because of the tight calves.....so if we roll the tight calves over to riding, my big to sticks up when I go heel down, therefore jamming my big toes into the steel toe on my boot.....that is how I got ingrown toenails....the fact that my boots were steel toed just hurried the problem along, no give whatsoever ever.....podiatrist doesn't want me in them again......
     
    11-07-2012, 10:09 PM
  #30
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
What keeps your feet warm is not the sock, but the air layers in between the threads and layers. If your boots are snug, they crush the socks, hence crushing the air layers that you need to keep your feet warm. My rule of thumb for all my winter footware, whether riding, walking, skiing or skating, is that I should easily be able to wiggle my toes with my two pairs of socks on. If I touch the top or front of the shoe/boot, it's too small.
Oh! Well maybe I'll have to invest in some different boots. Not that I can afford any right now. But I will certainly keep that in mind!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muppetgirl    
Haha cold toes.....I know about that! When I got the ingrown toenails was after riding for a while in an indoor (so heated, no cold toes) and using a lot of heel down riding, reining for that matter. BUT on top of that, I also run, but I get shin sore, and now I've figured out why (thanks DR Oz) my muscles running across shins and my calves are tight and my big toe points up and my shins get sore because of the tight calves.....so if we roll the tight calves over to riding, my big to sticks up when I go heel down, therefore jamming my big toes into the steel toe on my boot.....that is how I got ingrown toenails....the fact that my boots were steel toed just hurried the problem along, no give whatsoever ever.....podiatrist doesn't want me in them again......
I had a problem with ingrown toenails, but not from riding. Both sides of both big toes. Had the minor surgery to fix them SO MANY TIMES I finally went in and told the podiatrist "Cut them out and burn them so they don't grow back. All of them." And she did. It was awful (Mostly just the Novocaine and after it wore off), but I've never had to deal with it again and tham makes it SO worth it!
     

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