breaking a 10 year old mare
 
 

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breaking a 10 year old mare

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    03-16-2013, 05:07 PM
  #1
Foal
breaking a 10 year old mare

I rescued my mare from going for meat the end of last summer ish. She has AMAZING breeding, owners before me had more money then sense, she was allowed to run wild with a herd and a stallion. She was boss of the field the stallion would not even mess with her, she wouldn't allow him by any other mares either.. so stupid people who owned her put her up for sale for a ridiculous price thinking because of her breeding shed be worth it, many people came and went someone tried to box her and she ended up on her back ..
So they called out the local meat man.. who offered them 400 pound ( you could not get head collar on her ) when I heard about this I had to have her cause I had seen her a few times nd she is gorgeous. She's like a bulldog next to a wippet when you put her by another TB duno if this is because she is American tb I do not know the difference.

So I get a friend with a small old wooden trailer to go pick up my 17h beast for a 2 hour journey , she cut her face open kicked the ramp straight off and fell twice on the way..
She really was a nightmare. I done some join up sessions with her and just played with her in the menarge and now I have her trust 100 on the ground iv bitted her saddled her lunged etc, she HATES her back end being messed with in the slightest so will not long reign , she does respond to reins Abit though when I'm walking her around.. I get her to turn and stop by using the reins.
So I was going to foal her this year but I got riding broody not foal broody so instead of waiting 4/5 years for a youngster I want to ride my cherry.
I attempted to get on her today and because she likes to follow me we was going in circles for a while until a very tall strong man came and offered me a leg up and she just stood, legs far apart unsure of the weight on her back, I thought she was going to do a bambi.. lol
But nooo someone walked her forward a couple of steps for me by pulling her lead rope.
I left it at that as I didn't want to push her or end on a bad note after such an amazing experience with her..

Sorry for the life story I just thought it be easier to give advice to me if you knew the lot ..
She has been fully vetted, foot specialist, dentist and back.. had abscess this winter extremely bad teeth back is fine apart from sensitive due to never being rode.

So I really need help with this and what I need to do next, I think it would be a hell of a lot easier if I had someone else on her and I could lead her around cause the trust we have but people are so scared of her my only option would be a professional but I'd love to do this myself, iv got experience breaking youngsters but its always gone pretty easily

So yeah if iv missed anything out just ask and I be very grateful for all comments and advice

Thankyou, Katie and cherry

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    03-16-2013, 05:29 PM
  #2
Foal
P.s I'm from the UK so when I refer to her as an American TB is because I'm used to English tbs
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    03-16-2013, 06:20 PM
  #3
Showing
While I commend your choice to save this mare, I strongly suggest you get some help from a more experienced horse breaker/trainer. I've trained a few older horses and, while they seem to be more sensible about not spooking at random stuff, they also seem more difficult and resistant to being soft like they should.

Also, the touchiness about her back that you mentioned means 2 things to me. 1) She might be "cold backed" where she will be willing to buck if pushed even a little bit or 2) she's got some pain issues going there and having her back touched actually hurts.
     
    03-16-2013, 07:09 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
While I commend your choice to save this mare, I strongly suggest you get some help from a more experienced horse breaker/trainer. I've trained a few older horses and, while they seem to be more sensible about not spooking at random stuff, they also seem more difficult and resistant to being soft like they should.

Also, the touchiness about her back that you mentioned means 2 things to me. 1) She might be "cold backed" where she will be willing to buck if pushed even a little bit or 2) she's got some pain issues going there and having her back touched actually hurts.


Thankyou for your reply, She has had the back specialist out and vet checked her over and they say her back is fine and say its just sensitive due to her being her age and not ever had it messed with,
Its not her back that she is funny with its her back end... Bum, Back legs
( she's a kicker and she's very good at it lol )

So what would you recommend my next step be into the process of getting her rideable, I mean if it were a youngster I would probebly longe her with someone on her but I do not think she is ready for that just yet, im trying to take her as slow as poss. Like I say all I have done is sat on her for about 10 mins today and probs walked about 5 steps..
     
    03-16-2013, 07:43 PM
  #5
Started
Hi Katie,

I would think if she is a good big TB that she is probably national hunt bred, if you know her breeding it would be easy enough to find out. NH breds in my experience tend to be bigger, thicker and have more one than the flatbreds... I've met numerous over 17hh

I agree with SM, you will want assistance in the breaking process. If you can get her professionally broken, it would likely be the safest option for all involved. Just choose and reputable trainer. It'll be up to you to decide if you have the ability to break her yourself, but try and put feelings aside and do what would benefit your mare the most :)

Good luck with her, would love to see some pics and hear how you get on with her.
cherrysmom likes this.
     
    03-16-2013, 08:13 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple    
Hi Katie,

I would think if she is a good big TB that she is probably national hunt bred, if you know her breeding it would be easy enough to find out. NH breds in my experience tend to be bigger, thicker and have more one than the flatbreds... I've met numerous over 17hh

I agree with SM, you will want assistance in the breaking process. If you can get her professionally broken, it would likely be the safest option for all involved. Just choose and reputable trainer. It'll be up to you to decide if you have the ability to break her yourself, but try and put feelings aside and do what would benefit your mare the most :)

Good luck with her, would love to see some pics and hear how you get on with her.
Hi Maple thankyou for your reply, yes I think it is NH Her father was bred for, her father is Primitive Rising (USA) if you have heard of him, im told he was quite famouse. She is HUGE.
Her siblings are used as eventers and cross bred with warmbloods, they are all bred by louella stud, I have tried emailing them about Cherry but no response.

I have had a ex jocky, very short irish man (rather cute), come look at her he only charges 10 pound an hour for riding and training etc but he said he wanted me to get on her back and get her used to the bit first, its hard to explain and its pretty unbelievable but people who don't know the real her are very scared of her,
I had an extremely good vet out to her when she had her abscess and even the vet was rather scared about getting in the stable with her, its really that bad, but I can do pretty much anything with her!!

I really want to try her without a trainer even if its just the next step so then I can get the ex jocky out to help me, so I really need advice on where to go with her next?????

I have broke and trained all sorts of horses with all their different problems but never one so old, oldest iv worked with has been only 5.. and that was a 14.2h welsh D.. lol
     
    03-20-2013, 08:58 PM
  #7
Weanling
I was going to give you some detailed advice. But the fact that the vet and jockey are a little scared of her tells me that she is likely dangerous (or they're wimps, but that doesn't seem likely). That may be why she was headed to the meat market, so please be extremely careful.

Cherie is a member on this forum with more experience in these situations. Maybe she can help. Like you, I've only broke youngsters (and only a very few).

I think the first thing I would focus on is getting her to stop kicking. I like to drive a horse from the ground before hopping on so I have more control and so the horse is less confused. Plus the kicking is really dangerous.
     
    03-20-2013, 10:44 PM
  #8
Trained
An ex-jockey may not be who you want to help train your horse. Racing training is far different than trail riding, reining, dressage, etc.

There are definitely jockeys and vets that are intimidated by horses. Vets because many don't see horses over 16 hands, jockeys because they have other staff to help them, farriers that won't do drafts because they are big and scarey... LOL Not all horse people are actually horse people :)

However, you seriously need to consider that the jockey and vet are concerned for their safety because of the kicking issue, which very likely means that the horse generally doesn't have respect for people. In which case, you need to deal with that well and good before riding. Lots of ground work and ensuring proper and respectful behavior at all times from the horse.

It is also possible that she has some pain or a history of pain inflicted on her in her rear area. So when working with her, you need to learn when she is reacting from fear/pain and when she is reacting out of disrespect. Your response and training methods must respond according to the situation.

I would NOT put anyone else on her back unless that someone else is a secure, well-seated, well-handed rider. You don't want to put anyone else at risk, nor cause negativity in the training.
     
    03-20-2013, 11:02 PM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
I've trained a few older horses and, while they seem to be more sensible about not spooking at random stuff, they also seem more difficult and resistant to being soft like they should.
She hit it right on the nose. I went thru this with our older mare, and it's not been until just recently that she has started to come together.

I definitely would suggest working with someone who's had experienced working with cases like yours. A younger less experienced horse is easier to work with than an older one, who's had more life experience making decisions on it's own.
     
    03-22-2013, 06:01 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs    
While I commend your choice to save this mare, I strongly suggest you get some help from a more experienced horse breaker/trainer. I've trained a few older horses and, while they seem to be more sensible about not spooking at random stuff, they also seem more difficult and resistant to being soft like they should.
Definitely agreed, you need the help of a someone more experienced. Some older horses can be tricky to train, just because they have gone X number of years doing their own thing, and have already formed an opinion about pretty much everything. They may seem sensible and less spooky in general, but getting them to gain a new perspective about things can be rather "fun" at times.
     

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