Can a 15.1 hh, 1100 lb quarter horse carry a 300 lb man for a short 1 hr trail ride? - Page 11
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Can a 15.1 hh, 1100 lb quarter horse carry a 300 lb man for a short 1 hr trail ride?

This is a discussion on Can a 15.1 hh, 1100 lb quarter horse carry a 300 lb man for a short 1 hr trail ride? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Heavy riders on horses
  • Extremely overweight man riding on horseback videos

Like Tree153Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-16-2013, 08:32 AM
  #101
Yearling
Re: the two girls on that pony, I got physically nauseated, and couldn't watch more than probably thirty seconds. I kept thinking..."THOSE WOMEN are old enough to WELL KNOW BETTER than to ask that sweet, tiny mini to carry ONE OF THEM, let alone TWO!"

Did you see it try to buck, but the girl in the back was so heavy it couldn't even use it's G-d given defenses to get that huge weight off of it's BUTTOCKS, (where she was, in reality, "riding")...So grotesque.

As for human body breakdown secondary to weight carrying & concussive forces of gravity, I live with those results daily! When I say "I", this refers to watching my DH, who at age 43 should be in his prime, suffer constant, debilitating pain. He is an Army vet-82nd Airborne, with hundreds of jumps under his belt, including a night jump where he hit the ground going, as estimated, twice as rapidly as he should have been...whomever the rigger was responsible for packing his chute made an error.

His chute opened improperly, causing a terrible spin, which he thankfully was able to essentially untangle, but with the side effect of being unable to slow himself in proper time, having allotted so much time to the act of stabilizing his chute during this high wind night jump (which, by the way, never should have occurred. Their highest officer requested twice for orders to have it canceled, and the commander above said,"No way. Jump is on!"--or something to that effect)...Anyhow, my husband sustained severe ankle fractures, right side body injuries of numerous types, and what we now know to be a fractured vertebrae in his cervical spine, his lumbar spine, and his thoracic spine, totaling (obviously) three severe vertebral fractures, leaving his arms numb every morning upon waking and remaining such for at least thirty minutes after waking. His ambulation is so "off", due to his injuries, causing his boots to wear so unevenly, that to see the left vs.the right is almost astounding.

He was the mortar guy in the army also, so, on jumps, he not only carried a very heavy ruck as did all the guys, but also carried that 60# plate!
On top of this (his injuries incurred prior to war time), he did serve in Desert Storm ( heading for Iraq one month after having the last of the pins removed from his R ankle!) and while over there continued earning numerous service medals and was an amazing troop.

Despite his disabilities, he still works a completely physical job, and takes no narcotic pain meds because he so fears side effects. He's truly my hero. The point in all of this, is he is extremely athletic, fit, carries maybe 20# more than ideal (as HE sees it, because he's 20# more than he was upon returning from the middle east!) and he doesn't complain, but is still in pain all the time. When bodies are asked to do abnormal things, even when in excellent shape, there can be long term consequences, and such early breakdown! I can't imagine denying such...his army buddies ALL HAVE similar physical issues.They were all in from four to twenty years, and every guy that was in service longer than four years has worse injuries than the guys who served less time...

I know my husband wouldn't trade his military time for ANYTHING, EVEN with his injuries...so I "get" the horse that struggles to keep doing a job, carrying a heavy weight because they are inclined to please, to succeed, to do anything they're asked, even if it hurts.

We as the humans have a responsibility to be aware of preventing them from doing the stuff that hurts them in that case!

**By the way, I have to add that I absolutely LOVE THE PIC of the rider on the feather-footed draft breed! The rider looks lovely up there, position, apparently (from the look of it) the well-fitted saddle and all; the horse is gorgeous (!) & the two make an absolutely picture perfect view together! I'd love to ride a draft...I feel we'd be well suited, that my "bulky looking/stocky" frame would appear more "lithe" from the back of a draft. (how VAIN DID THAT SOUND? Yikes!)...Most importantly, I'd simply love riding a draft breed, their sweetness, their enormous stride, feeling extra secure up there like riding a TANK! I have just adored all the Clydes and Shires I've met!

Thanks so much for the share of that photo, as it really got me thinking. It emphasizes to me that perhaps I should look in that "realm" as another possible option in my ever changing horse-search! :)
Hope this all wasn't too off topic.
Beling, bsms, nvr2many and 1 others like this.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-16-2013, 12:09 PM
  #102
Trained
Moderation is a wonderful thing. Spend your life sitting on the sofa, chomping on chips, and you are likely to have lots of health problems. Become a pro athlete...same. My son-in-law is on 100% disability after two tours in the Marines in Iraq. Partly from explosions (brain injuries), but partially from the toll of carrying so much weight around - permanent damage to the knees, back & shoulders before he was 25. Something in between is desirable - regular exertion, but not a brutal overload. Same with horses.

It is a pity that more are not bred specifically for heavier riders. There are a LOT of 300 pounders in the USA today, and few horses capable of carrying them well. But horses like that DO exist, and it seems like it would be a great market opportunity for a breeder. The picture from the previous posts would darn near be a perfect advertisement - a heavier rider looking fine on a horse:



A lot of folks don't realize how much exercise you get riding a horse, so it might be a perfect market opportunity. Folks who wouldn't think of trying to jog for miles might get excited at the thought of a 1-2 hours ride on a sturdy horse - but most would also have better sense than to try it on my slender horses. Maybe a 15 hand version of little 13 hand Cowboy:



From the number of threads on HF worrying about someone's BF who weights 250+, it seems like a real market is there...
     
    03-16-2013, 12:13 PM
  #103
Trained
I have a (human) friend that weighs over 300 pounds. As a result, he has diabetes and hypertension. He is a heart attack waiting to happen. I feel bad for him. He certainly needs some exercise, but the heavier you are, the harder it is to get started. He (the human) is an "easy keeper". This is another topic, but it is one that is worth discussing, perhaps on another thread. Not only is the horse being stressed, the human has health problems as well.

I am overweight, but not obese. This whole discussion is an inspiration to me. I don't want to have to give up riding just so that I can be obese.
Stan and Back2Horseback like this.
     
    03-16-2013, 12:16 PM
  #104
Green Broke
At the same time, getting out riding would seem to motivate many to lose weight as they do it. I vote more horses to carry the weight to get people moving!
bsms, Celeste and Stan like this.
     
    03-16-2013, 03:11 PM
  #105
Foal
Just catching up on the thread.

We do ride for 3hours plus and also hunt for the day. However I have never felt the need that we would have to ride two to a horse in an emergency. If the injured person couldn't ride on there own then they would require ambulance, road or air, if I didn't have phone signal I would ride and find help. I'd lead an injured horse on foot.
Posted via Mobile Device
Clava likes this.
     
    03-16-2013, 03:29 PM
  #106
Started
009.jpg

234.jpg

011 (2).jpg

015.jpg

007 (2).jpg

014.jpg

O/K I know I have over done it but as the rain sets in the internet goes awol

First two are Savannah as a baby clyde xross TB huge horse
Next Stella Clyde cross with what ever jumped the fence at the time We call them station bred used for high country farming/mustering.
The black horse also some clyde in her 39 years old and still going. Now providing enjoyment for those less fortunite than us she takes disabled for rides.
Laying down is Kate a quarter horse but now sold and replacement being looked for. And last is Bugs my 6 year old green broke gelding quarter horse cross TB.

This has become a good topic and what was the general outcome.
     
    03-16-2013, 03:38 PM
  #107
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Back2Horseback    
As for human body breakdown secondary to weight carrying & concussive forces of gravity, I live with those results daily! When I say "I", this refers to watching my DH, who at age 43 should be in his prime, suffer constant, debilitating pain. He is an Army vet-82nd Airborne, with hundreds of jumps under his belt, including a night jump where he hit the ground going, as estimated, twice as rapidly as he should have been...
Not to get too far off topic, but there is a difference between the effects of exercise, even very strenuous exercise, and the damage caused by accidents - which includes the damage caused by competitive sports like football, rugby, hockey, and similar, where the players inflict serious injury on each other. Being tackled or hit with a hockey stick is NOT exercise, nor is landing too hard after a parachute jump.

I have a few minor bone problems, too, but they weren't caused by exercise, they were the result of getting hit by a car.
Back2Horseback likes this.
     
    03-16-2013, 03:43 PM
  #108
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesqf    
Not to get too far off topic, but there is a difference between the effects of exercise, even very strenuous exercise, and the damage caused by accidents - which includes the damage caused by competitive sports like football, rugby, hockey, and similar, where the players inflict serious injury on each other. Being tackled or hit with a hockey stick is NOT exercise, nor is landing too hard after a parachute jump.

I have a few minor bone problems, too, but they weren't caused by exercise, they were the result of getting hit by a car.
I was not talking about hockey injuries at all, I was talking about simple wear and tear, normal hockey is not a contact sport (although of course peole do get hurt). My OH's knees are not good from pounding up and down a pitch.
     
    03-16-2013, 03:56 PM
  #109
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkNumnah    
Just catching up on the thread.

We do ride for 3hours plus and also hunt for the day. However I have never felt the need that we would have to ride two to a horse in an emergency. If the injured person couldn't ride on there own then they would require ambulance, road or air, if I didn't have phone signal I would ride and find help. I'd lead an injured horse on foot.
Posted via Mobile Device
Have you visited the more remote and less populated areas of Canada and the US?

I know that my perceptions of many things have changed over here, for instance I didn't carry a rifle when checking cows in the UK, I do here. Without leaving my own land (or more correctly the banks, but that is a different discussion) I can quite see getting to areas that we would have to double up for some of the journey back, maybe. Without moving to far away from here we are talking genuinely of life and death decisions when it comes to problems on the trail, due to climate, conditions, wild life etc etc.

So having lived both lives, UK life is a lot softer, you PROBABLY have never had to shoot an animal because the vet couldn't get to you, we have. When it comes to the real crunch, a human life to me outweighs possible harm to an animal, and if needs must then you do what it takes to survive.
     
    03-16-2013, 04:25 PM
  #110
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clava    
Normal hockey is not a contact sport (although of course peole do get hurt).
In WHAT universe?!

Seriously though, I know what you mean.
Golden Horse likes this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
3rd ANNUAL TRAIL OF HEARTS 2013 BENEFIT HORSE TRAIL RIDE jsampsonccs Trail Riding 0 12-26-2012 10:16 AM
How to prepare for a horse's first trail ride? Jore Trail Riding 16 11-07-2012 10:31 PM
What do you carry on the trail? fly123 Trail Riding 30 09-05-2012 12:12 PM
Mini Horse Broke to Ride but How to Get Him Back Into That? How Much Can he Carry? poundinghooves Miniature Horses 6 05-21-2012 06:06 PM
What age for first trail ride alone?( people...not horse ) Bitless Trail Riding 30 04-20-2009 11:59 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0