Can a 15.1 hh, 1100 lb quarter horse carry a 300 lb man for a short 1 hr trail ride? - Page 5
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Can a 15.1 hh, 1100 lb quarter horse carry a 300 lb man for a short 1 hr trail ride?

This is a discussion on Can a 15.1 hh, 1100 lb quarter horse carry a 300 lb man for a short 1 hr trail ride? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

    Like Tree153Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        03-14-2013, 07:58 PM
      #41
    Yearling
    I could not agree MORE with Sahara's point. Absolutely true. The rider also needs to know how to cue the horse to carry itself properly, and know how to be able to feel/otherwise tell when the horse is using his or her back muscles properly.

    It takes a fully mature horse a full year of five days of consistent training/week, working on learning to stretch down, build a topline, etc...and most horses are not in proper training to build a solid topline and "use themselves" properly.

    I'm having to learn NOW, in preparation for my "future horse", the preliminary aspects of properly maintaining an EXISTING topline on a horse who has been trained and is in good enough shape to carry itself properly. Now, if I wind up purchasing a horse without the knowledge which I barely have, or, without the already existing musculature, then I'll have to pay a trainer not only for lessons for myself, but to ensure I'm learning to do the work with "future horse" to keep him learning correctly AND be able to keep him in proper shape!

    This is all just for his proper body mechanics and longevity/health, as again, I have no interest in showing, or "riding under the watchful eye" of any judges... :0)
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        03-14-2013, 09:03 PM
      #42
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Back2Horseback    
    ..It takes a fully mature horse a full year of five days of consistent training/week, working on learning to stretch down, build a topline, etc...and most horses are not in proper training to build a solid topline and "use themselves" properly...This is all just for his proper body mechanics and longevity/health, as again, I have no interest in showing, or "riding under the watchful eye" of any judges... :0)
    It doesn't take a horse a year of intensive training to learn how to carry weight efficiently. A horse shouldn't hollow its back, which it might if its learning is done under a beginner who hammers its back, but horses don't need intensive training to learn to carry weight. I doubt anyone has ever set out to teach a horse to keep its feet on the ground slightly longer or to adjust its stride in other ways that allow it to handle weight. Dressage training is fine, but it isn't required for a horse to carry a rider well.

    The OP's horse already regularly takes a 250 lb woman on a 2 hour trail ride. If her 300 lb boyfriend wants to try riding at a lazy walk for an hour, then make sure the saddle fits, have the BF use a mounting block, and then watch the horse (and rider). It shouldn't take more than a few minutes to figure out if the horse can handle the weight or not.

    Here is a quote I like:

    "I very much doubt there is any scientific way to calculate (weight-carrying ability), or if anyone has done so," says equine physiologist Karen Gellman, DVM, PhD, of the Department of Biomedical Sciences in the Section of Anatomy at Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine. "Seems to me it is a pretty de facto situation. The animal votes with his feet if the load is unacceptable."
    doubleopi and redpony like this.
         
        03-14-2013, 09:18 PM
      #43
    Trained
    I once allowed a very heavy man (over 300 pounds) to get on one of my horses. She almost collapsed under the weight. He got right off, and that was the last time I tried something like that.
         
        03-14-2013, 09:31 PM
      #44
    Trained
    Lilly was a small Arabian mare we bought unbroke. However, the guy selling her wanted to show she was 'green broke', so he got on her (before we bought her). She was a slender Arabian, under 800 lbs. He weighed about 325 without a saddle - so around 45%, maybe more!

    I wasn't there, but my wife said Lilly's eyes bulged out and she thought all 4 legs were going to give way. My wife bought her, brought her home, and the trainer took a look at her. She said Lilly's back was sore enough that we gave her a 30 day break before the trainer began the ground work to train her...

    Poor Lilly - hard to imagine her with a 325 lb guy! This photo was taken about 6 months later, after Lilly was actually broke, with my youngest on her (maybe 85 lbs at the time):



         
        03-14-2013, 09:33 PM
      #45
    Trained
    Lilly looks very happy. I think that she would have found the term "broke" to have a dual meaning if she had continued on her previous course in life.
         
        03-14-2013, 09:56 PM
      #46
    Started
    My horse is 13.5hh (not exactly sure what his weight is) but he once took a 300lb man for about six hours.

    But it depends on the horse. Some breeds were bred to be stronger than others. Not every horse is built for that kind of work.
         
        03-14-2013, 11:38 PM
      #47
    Yearling
    According to this video, as well as numerous other sources (though none so really duplicated as this), you will understand my earlier points about building proper musculature, topline, and a horse which can "most correctly" carry his rider and himself.

    You'll want to watch the whole (2 minute) video, as the most important comments re: time are in the last 15 seconds.

    smguidotti likes this.
         
        03-15-2013, 12:01 AM
      #48
    Trained
    I watched the whole video. It has nothing to do with longevity in a horse, or the ability to carry weight efficiently.

    Dressage is an admirable sport, but collection is not needed for a horse to move properly or to carry weight. The US Cavalry studied it in the late 1800s, and concluded that dressage principles were counterproductive to the military use of a horse.

    That doesn't make collection bad. I have no doubt that a collected horse is fun to ride. And some degree of collection can help with things like tight turns. The lower training scale of dressage has lots of value, since moving freely and with balance is always better than moving without those things.

    However, a ballerina moves with incredible grace, but she isn't what I'd choose to haul a heavy load. And while I've asked in the past, I've yet to see a single scientific study that indicates collection and dressage improves a horse's useable lifespan or overall health.

    I want to emphasize that I am not in any way saying teaching a horse dressage is bad. It can be wonderful, but it isn't a critical part of carrying a heavy rider, nor of keeping a horse ride-able into its old age. It is normal for a horse to carry more weight on the forehand. That is what their bodies are built to do. Just IMHO.

    If anyone has any studies proving otherwise, I'd love to see them.
         
        03-15-2013, 01:11 AM
      #49
    Trained
    AS to the way of going, it is a little obvious, just thinking of a horse as a bridge, then if they are going head up, back down in a hollow outline



    Then they will not carry weight as comfortably as a horse who is going in a more rounded outline



    So yes helping a horse travel in the correct way and making the back come up will help, but I disagree how long it will take.
    Sahara likes this.
         
        03-15-2013, 01:18 AM
      #50
    Trained
    I will agree, hollow is bad. It also takes little effort to get a horse to NOT be hollow-backed.
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    3rd ANNUAL TRAIL OF HEARTS 2013 BENEFIT HORSE TRAIL RIDE jsampsonccs Trail Riding 0 12-26-2012 11:16 AM
    How to prepare for a horse's first trail ride? Jore Trail Riding 16 11-07-2012 11:31 PM
    What do you carry on the trail? fly123 Trail Riding 30 09-05-2012 01:12 PM
    Mini Horse Broke to Ride but How to Get Him Back Into That? How Much Can he Carry? poundinghooves Miniature Horses 6 05-21-2012 07:06 PM
    What age for first trail ride alone?( people...not horse ) Bitless Trail Riding 30 04-20-2009 12:59 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:12 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0