Can a 15.1 hh, 1100 lb quarter horse carry a 300 lb man for a short 1 hr trail ride? - Page 9
   

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Can a 15.1 hh, 1100 lb quarter horse carry a 300 lb man for a short 1 hr trail ride?

This is a discussion on Can a 15.1 hh, 1100 lb quarter horse carry a 300 lb man for a short 1 hr trail ride? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Can a 15 hh horse handle 300 lb rider
  • What weight can my 15/1 quaterhorse/tb carry

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    03-15-2013, 04:10 PM
  #81
Banned
I would not be comfortable asking my 1100lb 15.1 TB to carry anything more than 200lbs. Even at a walk on a the trail.

There's often a weight ratio debate here, which I don't generally tend to understand. If there is doubt, then it's likely that the horse might struggle. The pic below is an ideal horse for a larger rider. I do wish we could stop trying to squish larger people onto smaller horses.


Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkNumnah    

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    03-15-2013, 04:13 PM
  #82
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clava    
I think in the Uk this is not the case, we would never attempt to get home injured but call for an air ambulance / helicopter or similar, but we are only a tiny island.
1) Here in the western US, about 90% of the places I ride (and hike, bike, etc) do not get a usable cell phone signal.

2) Would you seriously call an air ambulance for something like a sprained ankle?

3) As for carrying double, I don't normally ride with people who couldn't comfortably walk back to where we started (in case of one horse running away, or some minor injury). For a serious injury - where you'd have to ride double in order for one to hold a semi or unconscious person - I'd think you likely would do more harm trying to take the injured person back to the trailhead on horseback, than by stabilizing them where they are and sending (or going) for rescue.
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    03-15-2013, 04:15 PM
  #83
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesqf    
1) Here in the western US, about 90% of the places I ride (and hike, bike, etc) do not get a usable cell phone signal.

2) Would you seriously call an air ambulance for something like a sprained ankle?

3) As for carrying double, I don't normally ride with people who couldn't comfortably walk back to where we started (in case of one horse running away, or some minor injury). For a serious injury - where you'd have to ride double in order for one to hold a semi or unconscious person - I'd think you likely would do more harm trying to take the injured person back to the trailhead on horseback, than by stabilizing them where they are and sending (or going) for rescue.

I was thinking of serious /disabling injuries. For a sprained ankle they can ride their own horse home, or we would get someone to drive close enough to collect the person, we wouldn't double up riders (far too dangerous on our busy roads).
     
    03-15-2013, 04:26 PM
  #84
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
I personally don't care if a horse has been confirmed or not, religion and riding don't mix, lets keep them separate. As to conformation, it means EVERYTHING. A horse may be designed to carry only it's own weight, so to ask it to do more it needs to be built for the task.

Equally man was designed only to carry his own weight, but in recent military conflicts squaddies have been carrying packs of up to 140 pounds when they have needed to.



But it made Findus very happy

Back to the service man that can carry a heavy load. When age sets in so does the results of abuse of the body. Many sports persons that build their bodies to take weight and phisical abuse have issues in later life. Knees give out, Hip jounts need replacing, back is weak or had to be fused in places and so on, brought about by making, or changing the body to perform at a level above its design.

I to have carried heavy loads in my life and 140 lbs on the back is not uncommon in stress situations and army training, but for short bursts only The service man when placed in the situation of having to run or defend himself drops the load. No service man can defend him/herself in combat effectivly carring that kind of load, Not a good reference to someone who has been there.

Spelling mistakes are my property please don't copy.
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    03-15-2013, 04:32 PM
  #85
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan    
...In my view confirmation of the horse means nothing. A very large full blood clyde could carry such a load and looking at a horse of that stature one would agree. However the horse is designed to go forward. Its body structure has not changed in a million years.

All the breading humans have done have not changed the skeletal structure of the horse and nature did not design it to carry weight on its back but did design it to go forward...
We haven't bred any new bones, but we certainly have bred for a variety of characteristics that can help or hurt. Short backs, thick legs with plenty of bone, good feet, broad loins - from what I've read, those all help.

While Mia remains a short-backed Arabian, she has a mild club foot, long legs and carries her 875-900 (vet estimate) on a 15.3 frame. She tends to look like a big tough girl, but she isn't as big as she looks. Add to it that she is a klutz, and a heavy rider with poor balance could definitely pull her off balance.

Cowboy is maybe 650, but he is 650 lbs of tank. Great feet. Legs as thick as Mia's. I'd guess his loins are as broad as hers, all on a 13 hand frame. Not sure where I copied this from, but I've got it on my computer:

"Conformation analyst Deb Bennett, PhD, of the Equine Studies Institute, notes that the primary requirement of a riding horse is to bear a rider's weight on the freespan of his back without strain, and that certain conformational qualities can make that easier for the animal. In her well-regarded book Principles of Conformation Analysis, she offers the following wish-list for weight-carrying ability:
  • An excellent loin coupling--broad, short, smooth, and strong, yet flexible for coiling. The circumference about the loin and groin should be about the same as the heart-girth;
  • A short to medium-length back;
  • A neck set high on the shoulder, with a shallow vertebral curve at the base of the neck;
  • Moderately high withers, with a peak that lies well behind the horse's elbows;
  • A pelvis that constitutes at least 30% of the body length and slopes from 18-22 degrees; and
  • A total body weight of less than 1,450 pounds (658 kg)."
This picture of my 3 horses may help visualize how some horses can handle a higher percentage of weight than others:



Not the best I suppose, but compare body size and leg thickness and length between Mia in the front and Cowboy in the back. It seems obvious to me that Mia would have problems at a lower percentage of weight, although her overall size makes it OK for her to carry me. That's just IMHO, and someone good with conformation might be able to show me I'm wrong...
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    03-15-2013, 04:47 PM
  #86
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan    
Back to the service man that can carry a heavy load. When age sets in so does the results of abuse of the body. Many sports persons that build their bodies to take weight and phisical abuse have issues in later life. Knees give out, Hip jounts need replacing, back is weak or had to be fused in places and so on, brought about by making, or changing the body to perform at a level above its design.

I to have carried heavy loads in my life and 140 lbs on the back is not uncommon in stress situations and army training, but for short bursts only The service man when placed in the situation of having to run or defend himself drops the load. No service man can defend him/herself in combat effectivly carring that kind of load, Not a good reference to someone who has been there.

Spelling mistakes are my property please don't copy.
seriously off topic here, but this is a new machine being designed for possible military use; to carry very heavy loads over terrain that wheeled vehicles cannot manage, can be guided by one human handler.

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    03-15-2013, 04:48 PM
  #87
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexS    
I would not be comfortable asking my 1100lb 15.1 TB to carry anything more than 200lbs. Even at a walk on a the trail.
And rightly so, as TBs are a racing breed, not a RIDING breed.
     
    03-15-2013, 05:16 PM
  #88
Trained
Tiny, did you get that off of a Star Trek movie?
     
    03-15-2013, 05:21 PM
  #89
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sahara    
And rightly so, as TBs are a racing breed, not a RIDING breed.
I'm 10.9% of his body weight, he's fine.

Edit, as I suck at math.
     
    03-15-2013, 05:31 PM
  #90
Yearling
He probably doesn't even notice you are up there, Alex!
     

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