Can you ride with a thrown shoe? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 32 Old 05-08-2011, 02:41 AM
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Good grief, she asked a question, she didn't ask for a lecture from a bunch of activists who can't function without telling everyone else they're wrong if they don't agree. :roll:

In answer to your question, I would pull the other front shoe if you want to ride. I've had no problems doing it, and I certainly haven't had any problems with excessive growth or chipping since my horses feet are properly trimmed before every reset.

I would also ignore anyone who seems to think they know your horses feet better then you do without knowing the facts. Oh right, I forgot, barefoot fixes everything! That's why they're pushing boots right?

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post #12 of 32 Old 05-08-2011, 06:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj View Post
Good grief, she asked a question, she didn't ask for a lecture from a bunch of activists who can't function without telling everyone else they're wrong if they don't agree. :roll:

In answer to your question, I would pull the other front shoe if you want to ride. I've had no problems doing it, and I certainly haven't had any problems with excessive growth or chipping since my horses feet are properly trimmed before every reset.

I would also ignore anyone who seems to think they know your horses feet better then you do without knowing the facts. Oh right, I forgot, barefoot fixes everything! That's why they're pushing boots right?
Thank you...

To the OP, I personally would pull the other shoe and just wait for the farrier.
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post #13 of 32 Old 05-08-2011, 07:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macabremikolaj View Post
good grief, she asked a question, she didn't ask for a lecture from a bunch of activists who can't function without telling everyone else they're wrong if they don't agree. :roll:

in answer to your question, I would pull the other front shoe if you want to ride. I've had no problems doing it, and I certainly haven't had any problems with excessive growth or chipping since my horses feet are properly trimmed before every reset.

i would also ignore anyone who seems to think they know your horses feet better then you do without knowing the facts. Oh right, I forgot, barefoot fixes everything! That's why they're pushing boots right?

Woohoo

I have been called the NSC Nazi more then once ... I hate traditional feed methods of loading our horses up on grains and junk food :)
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post #14 of 32 Old 05-08-2011, 11:16 AM
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Umm, did I come off as an activist or something!? I didn't think so. I thought we were having a pleasant conversation?

I never told her shoes were bad. I used to shoe my own horses......myself. :roll:

I thought the point was more like "Easyboots are useful if you loose a shoe, you can go anywhere in them" or "yes, horses CAN in fact be ridden without metal shoes on their feet". Because the original poster didn't seem sure.
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post #15 of 32 Old 05-08-2011, 11:37 AM
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Horses are not so fragile a creature that they can't function with a missing shoe. If you have never pulled a shoe then wait for your farrier to show you how and use the proper tools. Same goes with rasping the hoof. Go ahead and ride with three shoes. Your horse won't fall over or break a leg or spontaneously combust because everything is not in perfect balance. Your horse is also not going to be harmed by properly applied shoes and will in fact not have to gimp around for a year until his hooves "toughen up". Even if you were to use boots the hooves still have to be properly trimmed so it doesn't save you much money in the long run.

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post #16 of 32 Old 05-08-2011, 12:41 PM
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My horse gets ouchy within seconds of losing a shoe, so I keep a pair of Cavallo sport boots on standby. Unlike other brands, they are oval shaped and stay on the hoof.

You just have to see your distance...you don't have to like it.
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post #17 of 32 Old 05-08-2011, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by trailhorserider View Post
Umm, did I come off as an activist or something!? I didn't think so. I thought we were having a pleasant conversation?

I never told her shoes were bad. I used to shoe my own horses......myself. :roll:

I thought the point was more like "Easyboots are useful if you loose a shoe, you can go anywhere in them" or "yes, horses CAN in fact be ridden without metal shoes on their feet". Because the original poster didn't seem sure.
If you didn't tell her shoes were the devil, then obviously my post doesn't apply to you does it?

She asked a question about a thrown shoe, she didn't ask for people to start telling her her entire problem IS the shoes. I understand people have opinions, but we've now turned this into BrightEyes defending her use of shoes to people who swear up and down no matter WHAT conditions she ride in, shoes are the devil.

We don't need to turn every single post about shoes into a barefoot VS shoes debate.

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post #18 of 32 Old 05-08-2011, 03:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj View Post
If you didn't tell her shoes were the devil, then obviously my post doesn't apply to you does it?

She asked a question about a thrown shoe, she didn't ask for people to start telling her her entire problem IS the shoes. I understand people have opinions, but we've now turned this into BrightEyes defending her use of shoes to people who swear up and down no matter WHAT conditions she ride in, shoes are the devil.

We don't need to turn every single post about shoes into a barefoot VS shoes debate.

Amen sista!

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
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post #19 of 32 Old 05-08-2011, 03:44 PM
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While my horses are barefoot most of the time. I'm in no way a proponet that Barefoot is the only way to go. My post and photos were not an encouragement for bright eyes or anybody else to take their horses barefoot full time. But rather to illustrate that they can survive a day or two of being ridden with out a shoe.

If your horse is ouchie after loosing a shoe, Then some kind of protection is probably in order. You choose whats appropriate, hoof boots, duct tape, or something of your imagination.

I'm not a big fan of boots for everyride use. It cost more to use boots than just shoeing the horse. At least for me with lost boots, torn gaiters and broken buckles. But I do believe a hoof boot can provide comfort for a horse that might need some protection for a day or two. I've seen many a CTR rider finish a weekend with an easyboot because they lost a shoe on Saturday. The choice becomes pulling from the ride or using a boot for the final day.

I agree with Kevin, If you are not familar with pulling shoes. Leave the opposing shoe and let the farrier pull it when he comes. And the same goes for using a rasp. If you are not confident of what needs to be done, Leave it for the farrier. But in my experience, shoes are usually lost later in the shoeing cycle and the hoof wall is usually on the long side. Between the damage that nails did pulling out and the hoof wall chipping your horse can become tender very quickly. Touching up a trim, if you know how, can help keep your horse comfortable.
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post #20 of 32 Old 05-08-2011, 08:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses View Post
Even if you were to use boots the hooves still have to be properly trimmed so it doesn't save you much money in the long run.
I disagree. In my area, the traditional taught farriers charge between 30-45 bucks a trim, or somewhere around 100 for shoes.
The natural barefoot trimmers charge between 20-30 dollars, for the same time period.

"All we are is a result of all we have thought."
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