Canter to sit trot transition
   

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Canter to sit trot transition

This is a discussion on Canter to sit trot transition within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Sitting downward transitions
  • Transition from canter to trot

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  • 3 Post By FoxyRoxy1507
  • 1 Post By Phura
  • 2 Post By Kayty

 
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    05-27-2013, 11:35 AM
  #1
Weanling
Canter to sit trot transition

I've been learning and getting the feel for the sit trot. Am wondering if during a down transition from canter to the sit trot is it appropriate to post a few strides and then sit after the transition? If not, what's the best way to accomplish the sit trot and not bounce around too much after the transition?

Thanks.
     
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    05-27-2013, 03:45 PM
  #2
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by BaileyJo    
I've been learning and getting the feel for the sit trot. Am wondering if during a down transition from canter to the sit trot is it appropriate to post a few strides and then sit after the transition? If not, what's the best way to accomplish the sit trot and not bounce around too much after the transition?

Thanks.
Try to discover a rhythm in the trot, like thinking outloud 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2 ect ect... and try to stand up a bit out of the saddle during the 1, 2, 1 ,2 section if you know what I mean.

But most of all: try to gain a RHYTHM!
     
    05-28-2013, 06:49 AM
  #3
Yearling
It depends on what you're doing.

In a dressage class, probably not appropriate to post a few strides before sitting... but I know in the jumper ring I have seen plenty of people bring their horse back from the canter and post a few strides before sitting or walking out. I personally do it often just because I find my TB's trot to be insanely bumpy to sit for the first few strides. (I should clarify, I sit deep when doing down transitions as should you... but as soon as my horse drops to the trot, I post a few times.)

Do you find that you bounce around when sitting the trot in general or just in a canter to trot down transition?
     
    05-28-2013, 07:08 AM
  #4
Trained
Canter to trot transitions are difficult.

If you are doing dressage, you need to find the rhythm, as I do not believe it is appropriate to post then sit.

The main thing here is really think sit deep...And just "think" your rhythm with your seat instead of trying to force it. Relax, absorb all impact through your lower back, hips, and heels. It's really a "feel" thing, unfortunately.
     
    05-28-2013, 10:12 AM
  #5
Weanling
Thanks for the feedback.

I'm riding dressage. I'm still getting the feel for the sit trot so I am still bumpy a lot of the time. But the canter to trot transition is the roughest. I feel like a pinball and just cringe pounding on my horse's back.
     
    05-30-2013, 12:13 PM
  #6
Yearling
The best way to explain it is find the rhythm of the sitting trot before you actually sit, so as you come out of the canter you will do a half halt with your seat, as soon as you feel your horse start to drop into the trot as it should start to swing your hips/pelvis in the sitting trot motion so that your pelvis starts the trot instead of trying to catch up to the motion. That is why you are bouncing bc you are trying to catch up, and remember to always push the horse into the trot from the canter or any gait so you have a nice fluid forward motion to carry on with and keep the horses back lifted.

I hope this helps, if not I can try and explain it a little more. Im working on this very same thing with my student right now.
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    05-30-2013, 03:46 PM
  #7
Foal
There were a couple tips that help me in sitting the trot. One being standing in the stirrups to get the feel/rythmn and the other being to exaggerate your movement of the hips. You can feel your hips movement with the horse and you can exaggerate this by putting that weight into your heels as you "help" your body get the feel. As you start to get better the movement will of course be more natural instead of exaggerated but the exaggeration helps teach. :) My horse has more of the western pleasure movement so its hard to feel with her but I had lessons on a barrel horse who had a much bigger trot and rocking motion at the canter so that helped!
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    05-31-2013, 11:21 AM
  #8
Foal
So, my lease is a wise one (read, he's old and been doing lessons for a long time) and I can tell him (with my voice) to trot and that makes for a much smoother transition. When I use my seat, reins, and voice, we usually get it right.
     
    05-31-2013, 09:17 PM
  #9
Trained
Others are right - in Dressage is it not acceptable to rise for a few strides after canter. However, because you're a newbie to the sport and only just starting sit trot work, I would rather see you rise a couple of strides to get the trot together, then start sitting. This is to save the horse's back, and allow you to work out how to keep the horse together in the transition.
The key to riding a smooth canter-sit trot/trot transition is to maintain the activity in the horse's 'engine room' aka the hind legs. Think of bringing the canter shorter and higher in the few strides before the transition, engage your core - it should be burning! - stop your back and allow the horse to come forwards into trot. Never think 'back to trot' as this will start you riding backwards and using the reins for the transition. Doing this will put the horse straight on the forehand with a braced back, making it near impossible to sit.

Basically, work on the quality of the paces and the transitions, and you will find it 1000x easier to sit on.
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