Cantering=death!
   

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Cantering=death!

This is a discussion on Cantering=death! within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        09-14-2013, 05:13 PM
      #1
    Weanling
    Cantering=death!

    I have been doing so well trotting, I figured why not try a canter. The only problem is YOU CAN NOT sit his trot. So transitioning is tough. I attempted to sit the trot for 3 beats and then cued for a canter. Right as he transitioned I was bounced up and my left leg went over the horn. I was litterally hanging off the side of him. Thankfully Gaylen stopped immediately, and I was able to regain composure and pulled myself back up. But my first attempt at a canter, after an 8 year break, did not go so well!

    I'm going to try again tomorrow. I know I CAN do this!
         
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        09-14-2013, 05:22 PM
      #2
    Trained
    This thread is English riding, but I think it gives food for thought for all riders.

    Riding the canter in half seat

    I particularly liked Maura's comment in post 11:

    "Riding the canter correctly and well in a full seat is difficult, and many more riders do it badly than do it well. As Allison stated above, it requires a degree of abdominal fitness, as well as correct position, relaxation and a good understanding of gait mechanics and how the horse's back moves. That's out of reach for a lot of recreational riders. I would much rather see an elementary or intermediate rider cantering in half seat, allowing the horse to move freely, than someone attempting and failing a full following seat and punishing the horse's back in the process.

    There is nothing inherently insecure about riding the canter in half-seat or two point as long as the rider is in balance.
    "

    I also recommend this video:


    Although it is about cantering (loping), I think it is good for sitting trot as well.
    Corporal likes this.
         
        09-15-2013, 10:56 AM
      #3
    Yearling
    I think the OP should concentrate on the trot first and get her seat there before she progresses, as I seem to remember her just getting into riding.

    ;) after all, one must walk before they run and be able to sit a trot before you canter.
         
        09-15-2013, 08:24 PM
      #4
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DimSum    
    I think the OP should concentrate on the trot first and get her seat there before she progresses, as I seem to remember her just getting into riding.

    ;) after all, one must walk before they run and be able to sit a trot before you canter.
    Well, I was quite an accomplished rider 8 years ago. But I did just get back into after a LONG 8 year break. I've been at it a month now, I was just aspiring for too much I suppose!
         
        09-15-2013, 08:58 PM
      #5
    Showing
    Work on your trot, before you even attempt to canter.
    beau159 likes this.
         
        09-15-2013, 09:13 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    Work on the slower gaits and transitions. Go from a slow walk, fast walk, collected trot, extended trot, and back down again. Then mix it up slow walk into a extended trot etc..
    The gelding I used to least was big horse. He would really pop off from a trot and the 1st few strides of his lope were really long. Doing transitions helped me alot..
         
        09-16-2013, 06:46 AM
      #7
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mrstorres2566    
    Well, I was quite an accomplished rider 8 years ago. But I did just get back into after a LONG 8 year break. I've been at it a month now, I was just aspiring for too much I suppose!
    I totally understand . It's hard to go back to the basics but better that than get into a wreck-been there, done that, bought the cast
         
        09-16-2013, 07:08 AM
      #8
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DimSum    
    I think the OP should concentrate on the trot first and get her seat there before she progresses, as I seem to remember her just getting into riding.

    ;) after all, one must walk before they run and be able to sit a trot before you canter.

    Agreed. My students years ago had to master the trot and be able to post without stirrups before we cantered. This was in part so they didn't fall off of course but more so they didn't panic and pull on the horses mouth. Never rush balance. It comes with practice and rushing things just gets one into trouble.
    beverleyy likes this.
         
        09-16-2013, 07:31 AM
      #9
    Weanling
    Is there any way you can take lessons on another horse? Right now it sounds like you're fighting a losing battle, as anyone learning to properly sit the trot you'll be flopping around a bit, which in turn causes a horse to hollow their back from the discomfort and the trot becomes even more difficult to sit.

    One thing that I have found really helps new riders is to post a stride then sit a stride for a while ten move up to post a stride and sit for two, slowly lengthening how long you are sitting. If you try to sit while you're already unbalanced you'll just end up even more away from the horses motion. If you break it up by posting you won't have a chance to get very out of rhythm.

    I'm with the other posters, don't move up to a canter until your sitting trot is much more improved.
         
        09-16-2013, 09:33 AM
      #10
    Showing
    I'm wondering if your horse popped a buck as it started to canter.
         

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