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Dealing with aggressive dogs?

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  • Dog aggression with horses

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    02-21-2012, 04:35 PM
  #61
Foal
I have 2 dogs that are not used to horses and that walk on a lead on roads and run free in fields and parks. Whenever we see riders, my little dog will yelp and bark like someone is murdering her and hide behind me and my big dog will just continue doing his sniffing thing in the brush not bothered at all.

The problem is, this little yappy dog could be taken as aggressive when in reality she is terrified.. Would you shoot or mace her because she was scaring your horse?

Don't go 'guns blazing' hurting a possibly nervous or scared animal because you or your horse feels threatened. See if you can deal with it in a less violent way first..

OP - in your situation, I would have gone guns blazing. Great Danes are meant to be big docile beautiful dogs, whoever owns them should be shot!

Before anyone questions my dogs behavioural issues, I promise we have tried almost everything and when I return from Oz I am getting a 'dog whisperer' to see if that will help.. she is nervous and scared all the time and we don't know why and have tried everything to fix it.
     
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    02-21-2012, 04:38 PM
  #62
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turndial    
I have 2 dogs that are not used to horses and that walk on a lead on roads and run free in fields and parks. Whenever we see riders, my little dog will yelp and bark like someone is murdering her and hide behind me and my big dog will just continue doing his sniffing thing in the brush not bothered at all.

The problem is, this little yappy dog could be taken as aggressive when in reality she is terrified.. Would you shoot or mace her because she was scaring your horse?

Don't go 'guns blazing' hurting a possibly nervous or scared animal because you or your horse feels threatened. See if you can deal with it in a less violent way first..

OP - in your situation, I would have gone guns blazing. Great Danes are meant to be big docile beautiful dogs, whoever owns them should be shot!

Before anyone questions my dogs behavioural issues, I promise we have tried almost everything and when I return from Oz I am getting a 'dog whisperer' to see if that will help.. she is nervous and scared all the time and we don't know why and have tried everything to fix it.
None of which is the problem of the person on the horse *shrugs* YOUR dog is your responsibility, just as their horse is their's. If you want to assure your dog's safety, do just that - assure their safety by having them under your control when you encounter others. A dog that is truly just hiding behind you is not going to be taken as a dog that is aggressively approaching a mounted rider.
     
    02-21-2012, 04:51 PM
  #63
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by themacpack    
A dog that is truly just hiding behind you is not going to be taken as a dog that is aggressively approaching a mounted rider.
And as I said.. because you or your horse feels threatened.

Aggression can be interpreted differently for different people. My dog barking at a horse going by can be considered aggressive. I'm not irresponsible enough to not have my dogs under control as much as I can but it's the rider that may think they're not.

We've all experienced that total moron when we are out with our animals who leaps out of their skin at the sight of a dog/horse/cat/ferret/elephant.. who's to say that moron isn't a rider in some instances? Are we OK for them to shoot on sight?
     
    02-21-2012, 05:33 PM
  #64
Banned
Turndial, let me see if I can explain this to you.

Here in the US, generally the use of deadly force is reviewed from the point of view of a reasonable person in the shoes of the person that used the deadly force.

If a rider is mounted on a horse that is terrified of your barking dog and the horse's actions are such that they place the rider in a position that he starts to fear death OR severe injury, he becomes justified in using deadly force to stop whatever it is that is generating that situation.

I think it's beyond argument that being on top of a horse that's losing his mind would place any reasonable person in fear of severe injury.

It matters not why your dog barks at horses. It only matters the effect it has on horses.

Now this is an extreme example. Most horses don't lose their mind because a dog is barking at them in the distance.

We can play what ifs till the cows come home. But in the end, the rider's fear of death or severe injury at the moment the trigger was pulled, and the circumstances that led to that point, is what the prosecutors will consider when reviewing the case.

The reasons why the dog scares the horse will be irrelevant.

And as I have already showed, my state has already codified the lawfulness of killing a dog that is worrying or harassing livestock. Most other American states have similar laws.

The bottom line is this: the onus to prevent these conflicts from happening rest ENTIRELY on the shoulders of dog owners. Whether you find that fair or unfair is not really relevant.
     
    02-21-2012, 06:03 PM
  #65
Foal
I agree with your bottom line.

My thoughts are not about fairness, they are about perspective. What one considers aggression, another will consider fear.

What you are saying is that It's ok to shoot, as long as the animals behavior is affecting the horse in a negative or life threatening manner according to how the rider interprets the reaction of them or their horse towards the animal.

My bottom line is that We cannot instantly presume that the dog is at fault.
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    02-21-2012, 06:30 PM
  #66
Foal
I'm going to give the animal control officer that's responsible for this area a call and see what he has to say about what happened. I've talked with him be for and he's a nice guy. I'll let you all know what he says.
As a side note I pay for a permit to ride on the beach.
     
    02-21-2012, 06:33 PM
  #67
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turndial    
What you are saying is that It's ok to shoot, as long as the animals behavior is affecting the horse in a negative or life threatening manner according to how the rider interprets the reaction of them or their horse towards the animal.
I'm not saying that. The law and jurisprudence of virtually all US states say that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Turndial    
My bottom line is that We cannot instantly presume that the dog is at fault.
Who exactly should be presumed to be at fault? A prey animal? Get real. Why do you think laws regarding loose dogs and livestock are written the way they are?
     
    02-21-2012, 06:34 PM
  #68
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radly    
I'm going to give the animal control officer that's responsible for this area a call and see what he has to say about what happened. I've talked with him be for and he's a nice guy. I'll let you all know what he says.
As a side note I pay for a permit to ride on the beach.
That's a good step to take.

And yes, I'd be doubly pissed if I the day I paid for was ruined by someone's dog.
Tapperjockey likes this.
     
    02-21-2012, 06:39 PM
  #69
Foal
And it's an hour drive each way
     
    02-21-2012, 07:30 PM
  #70
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turndial    
I agree with your bottom line.

My thoughts are not about fairness, they are about perspective. What one considers aggression, another will consider fear.

What you are saying is that It's ok to shoot, as long as the animals behavior is affecting the horse in a negative or life threatening manner according to how the rider interprets the reaction of them or their horse towards the animal.

My bottom line is that We cannot instantly presume that the dog is at fault.
Posted via Mobile Device
A horse and most people can't tell the difference between fear barking and aggressive barking. They also can't tell the difference between fear biting and aggressive bititng. Barking is barking and biting is biting.

As for who is responsible? Not sure who it could be if it's not the dogs owner. I would like to hear some elaboration on that one.
themacpack and Tapperjockey like this.
     

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