Discipling Horses
   

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Discipling Horses

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  • Discipling a horse
  • Discipling horses

 
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    06-20-2008, 12:51 PM
  #1
Foal
Discipling Horses

I was a senior of expirence at my old barn, but I often look back at my expirences there. Its not that the hands were taught to be violent, they just kind of developed that way, myself included. There were massive stubborn Belgian crosses and spotted draft horses, and it was not uncommon to see or recall myself striking them or kicking them for not behaving on the ground with things like picking hooves etc. It became very frustrating because in the camps the little kids learn nothing, they get the biggest most stubborn horse, and would come to me for help.

I mean, it just sort of bugs me that I had to slap them to get them to behave right, it makes me feel like I'm a bad horsewomen, even if smacking a draft horse on the shoulder doesnt really hurt them that much, I mean its not like I would whip them. That's why I'm so happy at my new barn, I've never had to be aggressive with any of the horses there, ever, even if I only ride with one horse, its not like my old barn, I don't know all the horses there and I don't work with them. So maybe I've broken my habit, but I think what Im really asking is,

Whats the best way to discipline a horse, and work on fixing their bad habits? And what should I keep in mind for myself?
     
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    06-20-2008, 02:26 PM
  #2
Showing
The best way to train a horse? Patience.

A horse will not learn positive things if you are aggressive in the way you describe. That is a sure way to make one into an outlaw over time.

There are a lot of good books out there that will give you some basics. I've been riding and training for over 30 years and I still pick up a book to refer to when I get stumped or just as a refresher. One of my favorites is by Mary Twelveponies called: There are no problem horses just problem riders. It was written in the early 80's and it still works today.

You can get a lot of information on this forum and some you need to take with a grain of salt. Read what the clinicians have to say but you have to get a feel for the horse's mind and how he thinks as well. Just a moment of temper can undo a lot of training and trust.
     
    06-20-2008, 02:44 PM
  #3
Trained
I personally have a couple really good books by John Lyons. I like his approach and have found them quite helpful when I get "stuck".
     
    06-20-2008, 03:37 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
I think it depends on the horse, some horses will actually resond to a gruff "AH!" sound while others need a little snatch on the leadrope, a kick in the side (when you are mounted - not from the ground - before I get burned at the stake), some of them do need a swat... it really depends on the situation and the horse you are dealing with.....
     
    06-20-2008, 04:37 PM
  #5
Showing
Farmpony, I agree but with caution.

You need to know when and how much. That takes time and experience to learn. I hate it when I see a youngster slap a horse in the face or kick it in the leg thinking they need to show the horse who is the boss. What makes it even worse is that too often it is the rider's fault that the horse misbehaved because the horse just doesn't understand what you want.

An old trainer once told me that every young rider will ruin a horse early on out of ignorance. With the advent of the internet and these forums, I hope that it lessens the chance.
     
    06-21-2008, 01:51 AM
  #6
Weanling
It really depends on what the 'misbehaviour' involves. If the horse is obviously trying but not getting it, punishing is going to do more harm than good! But if the horse is just blatantly ignoring you when your telling him something, you need to get more assertive and do somthing to get his attention. Overtime, this should result in a more and more obedient horse, if not, then you're doing something wrong. I think disciplining a horse is more of a thing that is learnt by experience and feel, not something that is a blanket rule that applies to all horses in all situations.
     
    06-21-2008, 03:32 AM
  #7
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses
farmpony, I agree but with caution.

You need to know when and how much. That takes time and experience to learn. I hate it when I see a youngster slap a horse in the face or kick it in the leg thinking they need to show the horse who is the boss. What makes it even worse is that too often it is the rider's fault that the horse misbehaved because the horse just doesn't understand what you want.

An old trainer once told me that every young rider will ruin a horse early on out of ignorance. With the advent of the internet and these forums, I hope that it lessens the chance.
I was getting ready to type out a long response to your thread but I don't really have to as "iridehorses" pretty much summed up what I was wanting to post and well since it's 0131 in the morning and I'm at work and trying to catch up on some posts, I won't bother...

It seems to me you already know what it is that should be changed in how you have been taught to deal with goofy horse behavior and are looking more for reassurance than anything.

Take on the advice already given by these great posters.
     
    06-21-2008, 06:55 AM
  #8
Green Broke
Good advice already posted..I'll just add patience and consistency.
     
    06-23-2008, 06:34 AM
  #9
Weanling
Best way to deal with a problem......prevention.

A horses behaviour wether bad or good is a reaction to its surroundings or any thing in it...that includes us.
If a problem arrises its your job to dig deep and find out what cased it and put into action what you need to prevent it happening again. Don't try and solve the end result go back to the beggining and rewrite the book......so to speak :P
     
    06-24-2008, 01:49 PM
  #10
Foal
I follow horsemen such as John Lyons, Clinton Anderson, Chris Cox, etc...
I've learned a lot from all of them. The things I always try to practice when working with my horse are: patience, consistency, clear communication, and follow-through.
If my horse does something I don't want it's probably my fault. That being said, on occasion, I do have to discipline my horse. When I do, I do it swiftly and fairly, and when it's over it's over--I don't continue to nag him. Does my discipline include physical contact? Yes, but rarely. And there are very distinct lines I won't ever cross.
     

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