Dumb question regarding riding styles.
 
 

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Dumb question regarding riding styles.

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  • How to ride australian style
  • Horseback riding australian style

 
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    01-03-2011, 01:39 PM
  #1
Green Broke
Dumb question regarding riding styles.

I have ridden western...I took beginner's dressage lessons...so
My dumb question is, what exactly is Australian style?

Do any of you have a stock saddle?
What do you think of it?

Thanks in advance!
     
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    01-03-2011, 02:09 PM
  #2
Showing
I think most are used in endurance riding and sometimes for trail riding
     
    01-03-2011, 02:43 PM
  #3
Banned
I've always seen Australian riding as a "variation" of the western riding development. The stock saddle was developed in Australia for ranch work, just like the western saddle in the U.S. The saddle was designed for long hours of riding as well as functionability. They have horns for roping work, and bucking rolls. I've seen a few people in the U.S. Use them as trail saddles, and I've heard they are extremely comfortable.

Here are some pictures if you are wondering what they look like. (the last one is a version of the stock saddle without the horn.):
Attached Images
File Type: jpg AusS 2.jpg (32.6 KB, 359 views)
File Type: jpg AusS 3.jpg (23.7 KB, 361 views)
File Type: jpg AusS 4.jpg (33.9 KB, 357 views)
     
    01-03-2011, 02:56 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Thank you!
     
    01-03-2011, 03:46 PM
  #5
Trained
Quote:
They have horns for roping work, and bucking rolls.
Big misconception - You will never see a stock saddle with a horn in Australia. It has been added to appeal to the US market and most wouldn't stand up to roping as they are cheap and not the best quality.

I live in Australia, own Australian Stock Horses, and ride in an Australian Stock Saddle.

To be honest, most stock saddles in the US are nothing like the ones we use here. They are generally very bad quality, don't tend to fit very well, and sit you about two inches up off your horses back.

Good quality stock saddles here retail from $4,000 to $8,000 new. Most makers have waiting lists that can be years long. So you can imagine that anything less than around $2,000, new, and in another country where things are normally more epxensive, really doesn't compare.

I got my saddle custom made for me and my horse by a saddler I know and trust and who is very cheap for what he makes. It cost me $4,000.

This is my saddle. You can see how close contact it is, the knee rolls are much more refined and placed more ergonomically than the saddles above. I had mine made with a lower cantle for mounted games.



In Australia, stock saddles are mostly used for farm work, Campdrafting, ASH Shows, and trail riding. Not so much endurance as they are quite heavy.

I see 'Australian' (I don't actually call it that, it is just a different discipline to me, I still do english events in my stock saddle) as closer to english than western. I am talking about ASH shows here. We ride with contact, in a frame closer to a dressage horse than a reiner. We trot and canter, not jog and lope. We are asked for extended trot in a hack workout. But we do also gallop, do stops, back ups, roll backs, and huanch turns.

This is me and my ASH at the recent National Youth ASH Show in the sporting (Gameing) events:

     
    01-03-2011, 03:53 PM
  #6
Green Broke
I am so glad I asked.
I was interested in perhaps starting my guy in an Aussie saddle, but I am not going to bother if they are not good over here in the US.

Thanks! :)
Western it is I guess.
     
    01-03-2011, 09:26 PM
  #7
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    
Big misconception - You will never see a stock saddle with a horn in Australia. It has been added to appeal to the US market and most wouldn't stand up to roping as they are cheap and not the best quality.

I live in Australia, own Australian Stock Horses, and ride in an Australian Stock Saddle.

To be honest, most stock saddles in the US are nothing like the ones we use here. They are generally very bad quality, don't tend to fit very well, and sit you about two inches up off your horses back.

Good quality stock saddles here retail from $4,000 to $8,000 new. Most makers have waiting lists that can be years long. So you can imagine that anything less than around $2,000, new, and in another country where things are normally more epxensive, really doesn't compare.

I got my saddle custom made for me and my horse by a saddler I know and trust and who is very cheap for what he makes. It cost me $4,000.

This is my saddle. You can see how close contact it is, the knee rolls are much more refined and placed more ergonomically than the saddles above. I had mine made with a lower cantle for mounted games.



In Australia, stock saddles are mostly used for farm work, Campdrafting, ASH Shows, and trail riding. Not so much endurance as they are quite heavy.

I see 'Australian' (I don't actually call it that, it is just a different discipline to me, I still do english events in my stock saddle) as closer to english than western. I am talking about ASH shows here. We ride with contact, in a frame closer to a dressage horse than a reiner. We trot and canter, not jog and lope. We are asked for extended trot in a hack workout. But we do also gallop, do stops, back ups, roll backs, and huanch turns.

This is me and my ASH at the recent National Youth ASH Show in the sporting (Gameing) events:
I've always been told/thought they are more of a western type saddle. It's interesting to find out what they really are made for. Thanks for correcting me wild_spot.

All of the Australian saddles I have seen here have been really high quality, but then again I've only ever seen three in person.
     
    01-03-2011, 09:30 PM
  #8
Yearling
Yeah I laughed when I saw the one with the horn coz I aint never seen one here with a horn and I think you'd get laughed at it you used one.
I actually quite like riding in a proper stock saddle those flappy things (cant think of the correct term) give you a really nice, long leg position better than an english saddle and I think its better contact too.
But each to their own :)
     
    01-03-2011, 09:56 PM
  #9
Trained
I've got a 'cheap' Australian saddle - ran about $800 on sale. Bates makes one for about $1900, and everything else I've seen runs $2500 US minimum. Real Australian saddles are out of my price range.

The one I'm using (Down Under) has been used a couple of years now, and seems to be holding up OK. The leather and stitching is NOT as good as either our Circle Y or my Bates english, but the horses and I are both happy with it. And you don't buy a new Circle Y or Bates for $800, either.

For use, I really like them. The seat is comparable in depth to most western saddles. The poleys help more than you might expect. When the horse spins around, the poley pushes your thigh and hip to swivel you around with the horse. I bought one after I took a spill, and used it almost exclusively for a year - while it still hurt every time I got on the horse.

I've ordered one with a horn, but that is for friends, and I don't know if I'll like it or not. It will be worthless for roping, but I've got friends who think a saddle isn't a saddle unless it has a horn.

From the pictures I've seen, it looks like many Australians makers are adding western style panels and tree to their lineup. Down Under says that style works well with many US horses and their long, broad backs. They told me it would NOT work on my Arabian (and Appy). Her back is more thoroughbred-like, and they strongly recommended going with stuffed panels.

If you are used to riding western, you'll find the seat more forward and english-like, but with a chair seat. A cavalry manual I read recommended a chair seat as better for the average rider on the average horse riding in rough terrain. I like riding English, but I use the Australian saddle more because my horses aren't well trained, bomb-proof horses. They are getting calmer, but they reserve the right to jump and spin without any obvious reason to me - and it has taken 2 years for me to mostly recover from my last spill.

They seem to be a love or hate saddle, so it is good to borrow one if you can before committing. Me? I have 4 saddles, and if I could only keep one, it would be the Australian one...or should I say, Australian style?
     
    01-03-2011, 10:42 PM
  #10
Yearling
Ooooooh what an interesting thread! I learned something new today!!
     

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