Falling off - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Falling off

This is a discussion on Falling off within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        09-14-2010, 10:18 PM
      #11
    Foal
    People can describe how to fall as much they want but the only way you'll learn how to fall is if you do it on a constant basis. The way I learned how to do it was by doing Aikido years ago, and now Brazilian Jujitsu.

    People laugh when I say this because they say that falling off a horse is different from being thrown by a person, but the fact is you get used to automatically falling the right way, distributing the impact of the fall over the whole area of the side of your body, and be relaxing your body before the fall instead of tensing up.

    So my advice to you is, take up either Aikido, Judo or Jujitsu. I've had many falls throughout the years (not only on horseback) that could have been very bad had I not been trained to fall properly.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        09-14-2010, 11:02 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Outbound    
    So my advice to you is, take up either Aikido, Judo or Jujitsu. I've had many falls throughout the years (not only on horseback) that could have been very bad had I not been trained to fall properly.
    Another way to "practice" falling is skydiving
    I took plenty of falls that way. The most common injury in skydiving is a broken leg from not landing right.
    How to fall on the ground is pretty much the second thing taught in the skydiving courses - right after "pull."
         
        09-15-2010, 12:33 AM
      #13
    Foal
    Since you've already gotten some great advice, I just have something extra, slightly off-topic to add...if you go riding somewhere where there aren't a lot of people and you're alone, always take your phone and have an emergency number on speed dial. That way if you do fall and it's serious, you don't have to wait for someone to come along and delay treatment for you. Hopefully that will never happen, but it's just good to keep in mind :)
         
        09-15-2010, 01:11 AM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    The Zen of Falling

    Hi,

    Funny you should think of falling. I somehow had kidded myself into believeing that I would not be doing any more of that. Heck, I've fallen 13 times in 11 years! Now that I am 52 years old, falling is just way more unappealing than it used to be, not that it was any carnival before.

    You got a lot of advice from folks who are more knowledgeable than me.
    I am going to try and incorporate that into my next fall, whenever it may be.
    I fell off my horse at the canter just two weeks ago and it was one of my harder falls, due to the forward momentun. I just hate that moment, described by another, when you pass the point of no return and you say, "oh s**T! I'm going down"
    I especially agree with the advice to always wear a helmet and carry a cell phone on the trails. Inside your helmet, write you phone number, name , blood type and any drug allergies, in case you are found unconcsious, God Forbid!

    Anyway, the thing to do is not to worry about it too much. It WILL happen, I can guarantee you, so just try to worry about controlling the when. It is in God's hands. Because it's quick and sudden , it frees you from the stress that comes with bad things that happen little by little.
    You cannot control it, so you are freed from that responsibility, just hit the ground like they said and accept.
    Most falls are not that big a deal. There's the shock element, then the free chiropractic and the air knocked out of you. I always find that while I am sitting on the ground feeling my body to make sure I am all still in one piece that making some noise or quick , heavy breathing (like being in labor ) helps to dispell the emotional stress. If I need to cry, or cuss, or growl , or yelp or moan . . . I JUST DO IT! I never care what others will think of me and my noise. Then I realize that the world has gone on and I'm still in it and I need to get back on that horse.

    Like another said, don't worry about making a big deal about it, just get back on, walk around and LAUGH! That's a big one for feeling better, if you aren't hurt. The real pain usually comes the next day, and you get to tell all your war stories at the barn or to your buddies. Show me the bruises!

    I rode today for the first time since falling last (I really reefed my pelvis bad). I felt tentative and kept wasting emotional space thinking of all the ways I could come off again. I had to drag myself back to the here and now and admire the exquisitely beautiful day I was given.
    Stay in the here and now. Your fall will come looking for you, so don't waste your time looking for it.
         
        09-15-2010, 02:00 AM
      #15
    Green Broke
    I tuck and roll..i'm a professional at it...haven't broken anything yet so I must be doing something. If for some reason I know I can't hold on or I lose my balance and can't gain it and know I will fall I will actually bail and tuck so incase I get caught in the saddle or whatever.

    Haven't fallen off recently..just bareback cause we were trotting and"oh,grass!" and I slid off her neck infront of her...good thing she didn't move!
         
        09-15-2010, 02:06 AM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shenandoah    
    Another way to "practice" falling is skydiving
    I took plenty of falls that way. The most common injury in skydiving is a broken leg from not landing right.
    How to fall on the ground is pretty much the second thing taught in the skydiving courses - right after "pull."
    Ha! Well, I'd say that's a bit different because you're really learning how to land on your feet and then roll into a fall. If you're doing Jujitsu or any of its variants (or any other sort of grappling style martial art really) you'll be practicing how to actually just land on your body, which is what happens when you're thrown off a horse.

    Since Judo or Brazilian Jujitsu might be a bit too violent for most people (I actually got ligament damage from a nice guy who was too excited about doing leg locks, even though he's only been practicing for a few years. The biggest problem in BJJ is that it's so hot right now in terms of competitions and everyone wants to be a bigshot and watch the DVDs and do all the neat moves before they have the basics down, essentially becoming a danger to themselves and others), I'd recommend Aikido. A lot of the moves you practice involve learning how to properly fall down and there's a very peaceful philosophy behind the whole thing, and there's no combat associated with the sport in the same way that there is for the other variants.
         
        09-15-2010, 09:35 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Outbound    
    Ha! Well, I'd say that's a bit different because you're really learning how to land on your feet and then roll into a fall. If you're doing Jujitsu or any of its variants (or any other sort of grappling style martial art really) you'll be practicing how to actually just land on your body, which is what happens when you're thrown off a horse.

    Since Judo or Brazilian Jujitsu might be a bit too violent for most people (I actually got ligament damage from a nice guy who was too excited about doing leg locks, even though he's only been practicing for a few years. The biggest problem in BJJ is that it's so hot right now in terms of competitions and everyone wants to be a bigshot and watch the DVDs and do all the neat moves before they have the basics down, essentially becoming a danger to themselves and others), I'd recommend Aikido. A lot of the moves you practice involve learning how to properly fall down and there's a very peaceful philosophy behind the whole thing, and there's no combat associated with the sport in the same way that there is for the other variants.
    No offense, but I'de rather not. I'm not a big fan of martial arts(Or skydiving!) and I will just like to avoid mmore that one dangerous sport.
         
        09-15-2010, 09:54 PM
      #18
    Trained
    Wow, I never thought of putting the medical and contact info inside the helmet. That's a great and simple idea. I do keep a phone on my leg in case I am separated from my horse. Like others said, it just comes down to gravity. At some point, you're going to come off. If I'm in a ring, I let go of the reins and tuck and roll. If I'm somewhere where he might run off, I'll hold onto the reins and try to just soften the blow if possible by a partial roll.
         
        09-15-2010, 10:15 PM
      #19
    Super Moderator
    If it just me, or do other folks come off fairly regularly? Like I said, I have come off 13 times in 11 years. Seems like a lot, no?
    Some of those were being thrown off, some were coming off during a lunge line lesson (no stirrups or reins) some were a horse spooking and doing the spinneroo and a couple were a horse that tripped and went down with me. And some were just plain losing my balance and coming off. But somehow that seems like a lot. I ride 3 to 4 days a week, all year.
         
        09-16-2010, 12:50 AM
      #20
    Green Broke
    13 times within 11 years isn't bad!
    You may think it's a lot but really that's not.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Horse falling down / falling asleep MyBoyPuck Horse Health 9 07-12-2009 05:57 PM
    falling! MollyK English Riding 11 02-06-2009 12:05 PM
    falling down Kirsti Arndt Horse Health 9 08-15-2008 01:15 PM
    Falling Off Help? HorseLuva15 Horse Riding 17 06-18-2008 11:48 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:30 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0