Fear after fall... help!
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Fear after fall... help!

This is a discussion on Fear after fall... help! within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Fear riding horse "due to" fall
  • Help child overcome fear after horse fall

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    11-22-2009, 11:10 PM
  #1
Foal
Fear after fall... help!

Hello everyone!
I am new here, started to take english riding lessons 3 months ago. During my 6th lesson, 2 months ago now, I fell while posting without stirrups. Since then I have continued to ride, jump,... but everytime my instructor asks me to trot without stirrups, I freeze, feel completely out of control and hate this feeling. I am so afraid of falling again. I landed on my hip and am still feeling some pain 2 months after the fall. I actually have an appointment with a physiotherapist to find out what to do to get the pain to stop. It does not hurt to ride, thank goodness. I am 38 yrs old.
I just wonder... is it absolutely necessary to ride without stirrups? I do plan on advancing to Dressage lessons eventually and I know I will need to get over my fear... I just feel too unstable still!
Today after my lesson, my instructor besically told me that I need to start doing it again and that I need to get over my fear of falling, since I will fall one day again. I know she is right, I wonder if there is a way to practice falling?
Any advice would be awesome!
Thanks!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    11-23-2009, 12:11 AM
  #2
Foal
Woof99 I feel your pain! I feel a few months ago (as you can see by my other posts) and my mare stepped on me and crushed my ankle. I've just started ridding again and I know exactly how you feel.
I've done alot of research and soul searching and this is how I feel:
I WILL NOT be pushed into doing something that brings on that feeling of terror. That doesn't do anything for me or my horse. I work up to that point, which gets further every time, and then stop. I know that it will be along time before I get back to ridding with confidence and enjoying it even half as much as I use to, but I will get there.
I have also decided that after a fall you have to have a trainer that is knowledgable in dealing with fear and falling. I was surprised when I went looking for someone to give me lessons and couldn't find anyone that had even delt with it before.
Give yourself time. Take baby steps. If your scared and tense all the time your just going to end up getting hurt again.
Good luck.
     
    11-23-2009, 12:20 AM
  #3
Trained
Definitely have her show you how to fall correctly. At 38, we've long stopped bouncing when we hit the ground. I had a massive leg injury at age 38 due to having to absorb the impact in one small area. The key to falling is to disperse the impact. When you know you're coming off, tuck and roll, away from the horse of course. You never want to hit the ground in a thud. I've fallen from my 16.2 TB several times over the past 2 years, and only once had a minor bruise since I roll. I find it very empowering to know I can fall off something that tall and not get hurt. It goes a long way toward building confidence.

To answer your other question, if you want to develop a good solid seat, you can't beat no stirrup work. There's little strap you can put on the front of your saddle that's referred to by most people as a bucking strap. It's great for something to hold onto instead of grabbing your horse in the mouth if you start to lose your balance. Another thing you might try is to just drop one stirrup. It's actually a little harder than no stirrups at all, and accomplishes the same thing without as much risk.

Two other things I can suggest are a nice sticky synthetic saddle instead of leather until your confidence returns or nice sticky suade or leather chaps.

Good luck!
     
    11-23-2009, 12:22 AM
  #4
Foal
Hi!

The psychological side of riding can be hard to work through. I know how you feel. I had a bad fall the last time I rode and even though I got back on and had a few lessons - now being ten years later, gosh I still think about it. I guess because Iam not as young and limber any more (27) and not under my parents insurance. If something happens to me- Im paying for all the x-rays and orthopedist appointments...ect

I would practice envisioning riding without your stirrups and having success. Positive thinking (as silly as it sound sometimes) goes a long way!

     
    11-23-2009, 12:25 AM
  #5
Trained
I would suggest to just walk for awhile with no stirrups to you are very comfortable with that.

Also, being lunged is an amazing thing ! Have your trainer lunge you & your horse. This way you can focus all on yourself & not on controlling your horse
     
    11-23-2009, 12:28 AM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
Definitely have her show you how to fall correctly. At 38, we've long stopped bouncing when we hit the ground. I had a massive leg injury at age 38 due to having to absorb the impact in one small area. The key to falling is to disperse the impact. When you know you're coming off, tuck and roll, away from the horse of course. You never want to hit the ground in a thud. I've fallen from my 16.2 TB several times over the past 2 years, and only once had a minor bruise since I roll. I find it very empowering to know I can fall off something that tall and not get hurt. It goes a long way toward building confidence.

To answer your other question, if you want to develop a good solid seat, you can't beat no stirrup work. There's little strap you can put on the front of your saddle that's referred to by most people as a bucking strap. It's great for something to hold onto instead of grabbing your horse in the mouth if you start to lose your balance. Another thing you might try is to just drop one stirrup. It's actually a little harder than no stirrups at all, and accomplishes the same thing without as much risk.

Two other things I can suggest are a nice sticky synthetic saddle instead of leather until your confidence returns or nice sticky suade or leather chaps.

Good luck!
Can you come to my house and teach me?
     
    11-23-2009, 12:30 AM
  #7
Foal
I would definitely put some more thought into riding without insurance. This past Sunday I fell and lacerated both my liver and my kidney and had to be transported from the original hospital I went to by ambulance to a better one. And I was hospitalized until Wednesday. All without insurance.
(haven't got my full bill yet but I do know i'm paying almost $900 for just the ambulance ride)

Anyways, I don't (obviously) know the proper way to fall nor do I know anything about riding again after the fall (I have been on bedrest since) but I do know that riding at all without insurance simply isn't smart and will definitely be expensive.
     
    11-23-2009, 12:35 AM
  #8
Foal
I agree dacer44. My ankle injury has cost 60,000 and counting. We're still not done.
But my husband is in the military (Thank God!) and we haven't had to pay much of it
     
    11-23-2009, 10:17 AM
  #9
Weanling
Alot of wonderful advice up there. I totally agree to do not let anyone push you beyond your comfort zone. Also the key to falling is to roll.

I had my confidence shattered when I was in my late 30's by my 16.2 knothead TB. I realized then I no longer bounced, but thankfully my sub-conscience would kick in and take over where I still rolled when being tossed.

My lack of confidence carried over to my young QH, who was newly under saddle, which wasn't a good thing. In my mind, she could blow up at any time. It took time to get my confidence back, which just blew my mind as I've ridden all my life, hit the ground before many times over many years, and was still next to fearless. We become more cautious as we get older.

My confidence came back, as will yours. I'm 50 now and do excercise caution. I ride my own horse as I've had this one all her life and trust her. I won't climb on froggy horses anymore - I think "what if I come off, land wrong and break a hip?" lol.. I'm old now.

You work at your own pace. Just tell your trainer what the deal is straight up. She will have to deal with it and comply with not pushing you past your comfort zone, period... like it or not.
     
    11-23-2009, 10:52 AM
  #10
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by qtrhrsecrazy    
.
. I'm 50 now and do excercise caution.

You work at your own pace. Just tell your trainer what the deal is straight up. She will have to deal with it and comply with not pushing you past your comfort zone, period... like it or not.
You are still a child!!

I agree 100% with the second part of the post and the ones above. Work at your own pace and comfort level but push youself a little. Even though I have ridden my whole life and have owned my own horses for over 25 years, a rather severe accident I had in 2007 while trying a new horse, shook me to my core and it took a LONG time to even begin to overcome the fear. I had to really push myself to even step in the saddle again.

Learning to fall sounds good but unless you really practice it off a horse so that it becomes a learned reaction, I don't believe that it will be going through your mind as you come off your horse (LOL). Things happen in a split second.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fear of riding? ChexMix1000 Western Riding 26 04-16-2009 05:04 AM
Fear of Falling cjessy Horse Riding 11 11-20-2008 12:56 AM
fear of getting in with my horse lorgrad Horse Training 14 06-30-2008 12:02 PM
So proud of him! Gem got over his fear! appylover31803 Horse Training 7 06-08-2008 07:13 PM
unusual fear sempre_cantando Horse Talk 13 05-14-2008 04:59 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0