First Fall O.O and Stubborn Horse
   

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First Fall O.O and Stubborn Horse

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  • Stubborn jumping horses
  • stubborn horse won't move

 
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    11-07-2010, 06:54 PM
  #1
Weanling
First Fall O.O and Stubborn Horse

Okay well, now Im 'officially' a rider :P Haha. After 9 years of riding. Lmao. Anyways, heres the story:

Well the night before my first show, we were going around the x-rails a few times to get the lines down, but each time on one line, my horse would go over the first jump, but then curve her body and throw her head up and swerve out from between the two jumps. I was trying as hard as I possibly could to keep her from getting squirmy and arching out, but no matter how much leg I put on her right side to push her over and open the left rein, she IS still a 1000+lb horse, so she would always win and refuse to listen. So she kept doing it, so when we went over the first jump, and she swerved out like usual, and my trainer was standing on the left of us, and grabbed the reins when she slowed down, to pull her over and maker her go to the jump, but right then Val (the horse) decided it would be awesome to speed up! :O So this is what happened:
Trainer grabs left rein, while the action of speeding up sends me and the horse forward, propelling me over her shoulder on the left while the horse goes to the left, down on her knees and then her right shoulder, as I roll off her shoulder and smack my trainer in the nose with my boot, while my trainer is getting pulled into the horse, as we all go down. Got a mouth full of dirt! Haha. It was pretty funny actually (not the fact that we fell and I almost got crushed, but how graceful I fell, apparently). It was scary though, seeing my face going towards the ground and a hoof flying at my face. Good thing my body reacted instinctually to roll my shoulder so I landed on my side and rolled away from the horse so she wouldnt crush me.

Almost got it on video too! And my mom reacted well and just stood by the sidelines. She said she saw my shoulder rolling and knew I was going to be fine, so yay. Glad she trusts I can handle things like this well enough! I also got right back on after my trainer helped me up and we patted each other down. Then we proceeded to do the line again, and we got it the first time, but then after that she kept fighting. Im starting to think she doesnt like jumping too much, because you can always tell when someone is jumping her for when she will try to evade the jump. She lays her ears back, arches out away from the jump, puts her head up and shows the whites of her eyes. On the flat, she's the best ever, aside from not liking the other horses (typical mare :P).

AND:
The next day(show day) my friend, who is also the best rider at our stables, was going to warm Val up on the jumps for me, since its my first show, and the horses second/third(shes a bit green still). But when she went to jump her, she was going straight, but wouldnt jump AT ALL. She refused each time. We even put the poles on the ground to walk her over them, but no matter what, she would NOT go over those poles. We have no idea why. So we didnt show her over the cross rails, just on the flat. Im not going to be riding her anymore though, because we really want to get into jumping more than I have been, so a more experienced horse is best for me right now.

Bahhh. Just my story :P

And another thing is that the day before the day before the show(lol) she was PERFECT. She didnt squirm or evade the jumps at all and we practically flew over them like it was nothing. But all other days before and after then she's not happy. We had her teeth checked and her whole self checked out, so its not medical.
Sorry for the long rantish thing :P
     
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    11-08-2010, 12:07 AM
  #2
Trained
What your trainer did was incredibly erm...I don't know how to say this, and not sound offensive, but it was extremely stupid. It is a good thing no one got hurt with that stunt.

I am willing to bet the mare's direct refusal, now, is a direct cause from what happened that night; would you want to go over a jump if the last time you were asked, you got pulled around, and over? Scarey to say the least, and I would probably turn into a dirty stopper over something like that too. I certainly wouldn't want to duck out directly.

If that horse had only been shown a handful of times, that was probably why she was "out of sorts" in the first place; maybe if you could have focused more on some flat work to get her thinking, and not worried about her surroundings, she would have been better off. I know when I take a green horse to his first few shows, I don't expect perfection, and I work with his comfort level, so that the experience is positive for both of us.
     
    11-08-2010, 06:23 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2pride    
What your trainer did was incredibly erm...I don't know how to say this, and not sound offensive, but it was extremely stupid. It is a good thing no one got hurt with that stunt.

I am willing to bet the mare's direct refusal, now, is a direct cause from what happened that night; would you want to go over a jump if the last time you were asked, you got pulled around, and over? Scarey to say the least, and I would probably turn into a dirty stopper over something like that too. I certainly wouldn't want to duck out directly.

If that horse had only been shown a handful of times, that was probably why she was "out of sorts" in the first place; maybe if you could have focused more on some flat work to get her thinking, and not worried about her surroundings, she would have been better off. I know when I take a green horse to his first few shows, I don't expect perfection, and I work with his comfort level, so that the experience is positive for both of us.
Ah yes, it was quite stupid probably, I agree. But she does this everytime we jump (not the trainer pulling the reins, but the horse curving away), and no matter what I do, I just can't get her over. I understand really why my trainer did it; we were both getting fed up with her. Keep in mind the horse had slowed down to a trot then was walking when this happened, so it wasnt supposed to of been a forceful jerk by any means. The horse sped up, so it kind of just...happened.

The thing that makes me believe it wasnt this incident that caused her to refuse, was because after this happened, we went around the jumps a few times just fine. She was still squirmy, but never refused. Even when another girl got on after me to walk her out, etc, she jumped just fine.

As for flat work, she does great. I only showed her in flat classes on the day of the show, and spent most of the day in the schooling ring working on the flat, as well as every other lesson before the show we worked on the flat. By any means, I was not looking for perfection! Especially since it was my first show. It was just kind of a bummer that I didnt get to jump, but we wernt going to force her to jump in a cruel way. We tried to get her to listen with a tap on the bum, but she wouldnt go over any ground poles, even without a rider on her. I suppose it was just an off day for her. Everyone at the show was having problems of sorts! Two of our riders fell off multiple times, other kept tripping, gah! Other than those things though, it was an enjoyable experience.
     
    11-08-2010, 07:48 PM
  #4
Trained
Perhaps then, if she won't even go over ground poles on a lunge, then it is really time for a refresher course in ground skills...she is not respecting her handlers, and needs to be reminded that YOU control her feet, not the other way around.

IF pain, and other medical issues have been ruled out, I would be seriously working on her ground manners; If I ask a horse to go over, between, or under something, I expect him to do so, willingly, without ducking out...if he can't do it on the ground, then there is NO way he will do it undersaddle. Get her working over poles on the ground, then shift back to saddle work. Of course, if this isn't your horse, it is her trainer's responsibility for fixing the actual problem, instead of just jumping her as she is. She has a problem, and it won't be fixed by simply ignoring it, and "hoping" she will jump when you take her out...I was under the impression from your original post that this was a first for her, so that's why I posted the way I did...BUT now that I have more details, then yes, you are right, this is a problem, if it is a continual battle to get her over jumps when ever someone rides...
     
    11-08-2010, 08:01 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2pride    
Perhaps then, if she won't even go over ground poles on a lunge, then it is really time for a refresher course in ground skills...she is not respecting her handlers, and needs to be reminded that YOU control her feet, not the other way around.

IF pain, and other medical issues have been ruled out, I would be seriously working on her ground manners; If I ask a horse to go over, between, or under something, I expect him to do so, willingly, without ducking out...if he can't do it on the ground, then there is NO way he will do it undersaddle. Get her working over poles on the ground, then shift back to saddle work. Of course, if this isn't your horse, it is her trainer's responsibility for fixing the actual problem, instead of just jumping her as she is. She has a problem, and it won't be fixed by simply ignoring it, and "hoping" she will jump when you take her out...I was under the impression from your original post that this was a first for her, so that's why I posted the way I did...BUT now that I have more details, then yes, you are right, this is a problem, if it is a continual battle to get her over jumps when ever someone rides...
Your post was an understandable and reasonable reaction :] I agree that she should be worked from the ground up again. She really needs to learn manners, to be honest, but she's just a horse I rode in my lessons, so unfortunately I can't control her training. I trust that my trainer will do whats right though. She never meant to put me in danger, and never forces me to do anything I don't want to do, nor the horse. Im not going to be jumping her anymore though, due to the fact that I really want to get more serious with it and need to focus more by having an experienced lesson horse to ride. Or my own horse soon :]
     

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