First Trail ride THIS WAS AN ADVERNTURE so is this a good idea? - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

First Trail ride THIS WAS AN ADVERNTURE so is this a good idea?

This is a discussion on First Trail ride THIS WAS AN ADVERNTURE so is this a good idea? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Horse's first ride with an experienced horse good idea?

Like Tree25Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    11-07-2013, 03:54 PM
  #11
Super Moderator
^^^This
If you don't work on first getting your horses trust you stand a good chance of making a bad situation even worse and getting yourself hurt too
We always ride our young horses out with a solid reliable experienced horse until they feel confident in the world outside of the barn and then begin solo riding by taking them on their own for just short distances to begin with and increasing as they feel secure with themselves
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    11-08-2013, 11:04 AM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by CheyRider    
Take him on walks. Show him the world until he sees it's not so scary. Let him graze somewhere during the walk to attach positive feelings to leaving the barn. Nothing wrong with treats either, as long as you make sure not to give him one when HE stops, but only when YOU stop him. I love stopping a horse and then giving a treat when they obey promptly, because it makes a very willing stopper later on. Don't try to trail ride until he is more chilled.
My mare also had anxiety being out by herself in a world she didn't really know (but was still amazingly obedient), she got more relaxed over the months and now, over a year later, she is quite calm and relaxed about it (and doesn't poop 20 times per ride any more). It takes time, be patient and practice.

This whole thing is counterproductive. Handwalking a horse that is barn sour teaches them nothing except they don't have to do what they are asked or told to. And treats is also counterproductive in instances that come from horse being sour.


OP. Main thing here is you are not a good enough rider to be going out on trail ride with a horse that is going to test you. Some horses won't. Most will. If they feel/see you are inexperienced, a poor rider or weak?

They are going to try you.

Get some lessons, both for handling on ground and riding as those are going to be the basis for your riding better and being able to handle this.

But this horse had your number and babying him by treats and long walks on the beach type thing are not going to help you here.
Chickenoverlord likes this.
     
    11-08-2013, 11:31 AM
  #13
Green Broke
Quote:
Take him on walks. Show him the world until he sees it's not so scary. Let him graze somewhere during the walk to attach positive feelings to leaving the barn. Nothing wrong with treats either
a horse that gets worked up enough away from the barn to be dripping sweat at a walk is not going to stop for a bite to eat. He is extremely worked up. He does not feel safe. His herd is where he feels safe and the underling(rider) that he doesn't trust or respect has taken that away. Its remarkable that he didn't bolt for home or buck his rider off, as I have seen many times in similar situations. Aside from that, I agree with Palomine.

People need to stop "Disney-fying" things. You can't feed your horse some treats and have it 'luv' you forever. A horse NEEDS you to be a leader, not a loyal follower. They are a prey animal that lives in herds. Someone has to be the leader in the relationship. So it breaks down to two choices: lead or follow.
Following will result in a horse that starts disobeying more and more. Occasionally you can still do some basic things with the horse, but issues will start showing up. Barn sour at first. Rearing as refusal maybe. It typically ends with a very unhappy/hurt owner and a spoiled horse.
Or you can lead. Build respect and trust, make yourself worth following, and end up with a willing partner. You don't lead with treats. Occasionally they have their uses. Typically I don't use them. A lead mare doesn't coerce her herd into following using a carrot.
Chickenoverlord likes this.
     
    11-08-2013, 03:09 PM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Palomine    
This whole thing is counterproductive. Handwalking a horse that is barn sour teaches them nothing except they don't have to do what they are asked or told to.
I don't see how this is the case. Seems as though walking teaches the horse to move with the person, and builds trust - and vice versa. Worked that way for me, at least. (Though the walks were intended for rehab after an injury, so I couldn't have ridden her anyway.)

It's also not teaching them that they don't have to do what they're asked to do, because what they are being asked to do is walk with the human.

Quote:
OP. Main thing here is you are not a good enough rider to be going out on trail ride with a horse that is going to test you. Some horses won't. Most will. If they feel/see you are inexperienced, a poor rider or weak?
That's the other part of the "leadership" (though I hate using the word) thing. You expect the horse to do what it is asked to do, but you also have to learn not to ask for something that the horse is likely to refuse, or which either of you can't do competently. Otherwise you teach the horse that 1) it can refuse; and 2) it probably knows better than the human.
bsms likes this.
     
    11-08-2013, 03:18 PM
  #15
Foal
I didn't say wave a carrot in front of his nose to make him follow you. I said nothing wrong with treats when horse shows obedience.
I have nothing but good experiences from walking horses on the trail until they get more confident. It is much easier for them to see you leading when you actually LEAD them, walk ahead of them and show them how you are not scared of things. I find it much more useful and easier for the horse to understand than doing groundwork in the arena and then mounting and going out on the trail, expecting the horse to be cool since you showed who the boss is...
I'm not Disney-fying things because I give treats and prefer a gentle and patient approach to horses, and it doesn't make me a follower to my horses. Seriously, do you think people that take walks with horses and reward them with treats all get misbehaved horses that can all do just the basic things, and only if they feel like it? Goodness...
jamesqf, Chevaux and iRide Ponies like this.
     
    11-08-2013, 04:02 PM
  #16
Green Broke
Quote:
I'm not Disney-fying things because I give treats and prefer a gentle and patient approach to horses
I wasn't directing that comment specifically at you, its more a rant in general. Far too often people are babying their horses and problems that are very simple to fix come up. I have a friend like this and its impossible. It gets to the point where its a big problem and all of a sudden she's so upset and can't figure out how to fix it. I am as gentle as possible with my horses, and as firm as necessary. I know horses are many peoples friend/baby/pet, but first and foremost they should be treated like a horse.

I have owned many horses, several of which I was told were problem horses. Past the first week, I have never, ever had a problem with a horse being barn or buddy sour. I don't have to take them for trail walks, I get them riding good at home, then I ride out with no hesitation. I can do that on my three year old, or on some of the spoiled saddle horses I've retrained, or a horse that's never ridden out before.

I'm not a great trainer, but I know that respect and trust are important. You know a funny side effect of all this? My horses run up to me in the pasture and put their noses in the halter, begging to go to work.
Chickenoverlord likes this.
     
    11-08-2013, 06:05 PM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueSpark    
I have owned many horses, several of which I was told were problem horses. Past the first week, I have never, ever had a problem with a horse being barn or buddy sour. I don't have to take them for trail walks, I get them riding good at home, then I ride out with no hesitation. I can do that on my three year old, or on some of the spoiled saddle horses I've retrained, or a horse that's never ridden out before.
I would bet, though, that the reason YOU can do this is because you HAVE owned many horses, and so have the skill to correct behaviors from the saddle, and project that confidence.

Now if I understood the OP, s/he isn't nearly that experienced, and so wouldn't know for sure what to do, and would project a contagious nervousness. Really, the walking is (or at least was in my case) as much a benefit to the human as to the horse.
Chevaux and CheyRider like this.
     
    11-08-2013, 06:26 PM
  #18
Foal
BlueSpark, I can totally agree with what you write, a horse should be a horse and treated as such, they don't make good pet dogs. It felt like you were directly relating to my post (since you quoted me), I'm glad you clarified.
It's great you never even have this problem. I had horses that were slightly "barn sour", but mostly they were just nervous about being taken from a safe place into a world full of potentially dangerous things and creatures, without their horse buddies. I wouldn't call this a problem, either, but I just prefer to ease them into being out with me by walking them. It's just part of their groundwork (actually, it's most of their groundwork), and sometimes I walk them instead of riding just because I feel like it, they enjoy it, and you can do fun, trust-building stuff like jumping ditches together... they all relax when it becomes a routine to be with just that human to rely on.
I'm sure you can be a great leader for your horse in the arena and if they trust you enough, they will do anything, no matter how scary. But that doesn't work for everybody. I don't think most people have it in them to be such a natural leader, and if the thread starter had it in her, she wouldn't have this problem with her horse. Making it a routine to be out on the trail walking together might be an easier and more practical way for her to get her horse's trust than asking her to just be a better leader in the arena. From what she wrote, it doesn't sound like the horse is downright panicky or dangerous to handle away from the barn, so her plan including walking and treats is a realistic option. I would put a rope halter on him, though, for better control, should he start acting up more. I'd also take a carrot stick or whatever you use for groundwork to be able to set boundaries better.
jamesqf and iRide Ponies like this.
     
    11-09-2013, 11:30 AM
  #19
Super Moderator
I don't have a problem with hand leading a horse in a situation like this - we often took out young horses out on walks before they were old enough to be ridden - got them well acquainted with the world.
I also have no problem with giving a treat as a reward after they have done as asked
haviris, jamesqf, Chevaux and 1 others like this.
     
    11-09-2013, 11:59 AM
  #20
Trained
When Mia was so afraid she would melt down within 100 yards...I hand walked her. It was much easier for me - a newbie - to see how she was reacting when I could watch her from the ground, and it was much easier to deal with her if she did melt down with fear. By the time we were walking 2-3 miles, she was less fearful.

About 50% of that lessened fear transferred over into the saddle.

There is a difference between a horse who doesn't feel like going, and a horse who is terrified of going. So the question becomes, "Is she barn sour because she isn't in the mood to go out, or because she is afraid of the big outdoors?" I tend to think foamy sweat and diarrhea indicate fear, not stubbornness.
jamesqf, jaydee, Chevaux and 1 others like this.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
3rd ANNUAL TRAIL OF HEARTS 2013 BENEFIT HORSE TRAIL RIDE jsampsonccs Trail Riding 0 12-26-2012 10:16 AM
Good Idea Or Bad Idea? countryryder Horse Talk 13 10-22-2012 02:10 PM
Extra hay, good idea or bad idea? lancek Horse Health 21 01-23-2012 03:39 PM
good place to trail ride nikkoroxs9 Trail Riding 0 11-09-2011 11:44 AM
Good places to trail ride during winter Monty77 Trail Riding 7 10-30-2011 12:06 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0