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Foaming in between the legs

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  • Horse lather endurance
  • Horses frothing at the butt

 
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    05-09-2011, 10:37 AM
  #21
Green Broke
My mare used to a lather a lot when I first got her, but doesn't do it as much any more.
I'm sure the lather is due to a combination of things, the reins rubbing, the physical condition of the horse, the extent of the work out, and emotional state (nerves, excitement)
     
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    05-09-2011, 10:57 AM
  #22
Foal
Ok, I will buy that it is from the contact with the reins. In cutting, you have no contact with the reins.

But, you notice, the horse is wet, not all lathered all over.

Unfit horses lather a great deal more than a fit in condition horse. It's a fact.

It is not unusual to lope a cutting horse hours at a time. You won't see a speck of lather on them. They will be wet with sweat, but no lather.
     
    05-09-2011, 12:57 PM
  #23
Started
No one said lather all over. Even the OP was referring to between the legs. Stick to the topic and don't over exaggerate. I've seen plenty of horses larger between the legs who are in amazing shape. Yes, they'll drip sweat all over, but they still lather between their hind legs, just to a different degree than an out of shape horse.
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    05-09-2011, 01:12 PM
  #24
Yearling
You are missing one of the main reasons for heavy lather on a horse. It has to do with a diet high in calcium. Horses that consume a higher % of alfalfa in their diet usually get 2-3 times the calcium they need and this creates a heavier lather.

This is one of the main reason that endurance riders avoid feeding a high % of alfalfa to their endurance horses. A thin watery sweat helps to disapate body heat much more effectively than a heavy lather sweat. Endurance horses that need to sustain an 8 hour performance in which it is critical they disapate heat from the muscles. Most performance horses have a 2 minute cutting run, a 16 second barrel run. So they are not concerned about long term heat management nor about long term muscle twitch.

But endurance riders like to give alfalfa during the race, because the extra calcium helps with the muscle triggers that cause the muscles to twitch. Calcium is stored in the bones of the body, But the retrieval of that calcium is way too slow during a 50 mile endurance race, So feeding calcium rich food just before and during the race helps the horses perform better. But since they have not been eating it all week long, they don't get the heavy lather.

Performance horses, such as the Kentucky Derby horses mentioned above, are often fed a diet high in alfalfa because it contain more calories than a diet of straight grass and the calories are needed for a horse under a heavy work out routine.

Do some searches on nutritional needs of distance horses and you can find plenty of dicusssion about the difference in diets and what they produce.
     
    05-09-2011, 01:24 PM
  #25
Showing
Interesting, Painted, it accounts for a lot of misunderstanding.
     
    05-09-2011, 02:12 PM
  #26
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimalia    
Ok, I will buy that it is from the contact with the reins. In cutting, you have no contact with the reins.

But, you notice, the horse is wet, not all lathered all over.

Unfit horses lather a great deal more than a fit in condition horse. It's a fact.

It is not unusual to lope a cutting horse hours at a time. You won't see a speck of lather on them. They will be wet with sweat, but no lather.
We are talking rein contact with the horse, not the rider.

Please remember a cutter doesn't work the herd for hours at a time. You work a 2-3 head and then typically the horse gets a break.

When you lope out horse that stays in frame, where is the contact? Reins are draped, you lope left, and then you lope right.

But it doesn't matter the discipline, horses lather with contact. It's a physics and chemistry.
     
    05-09-2011, 05:11 PM
  #27
Trained
Butt sweat is good sweat. It don't sweat if it ain't working, so your horse has indeed been working off his hind end. It's a good thing.
     
    05-09-2011, 07:35 PM
  #28
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
It don't sweat if it ain't working, so your horse has indeed been working off his hind end.
I agree with the first part of that sentence but not the second. Having lather on his hind end is not an indication of working off his rear - it's simply sweat from moving.
     
    05-09-2011, 07:39 PM
  #29
Trained
If it's localized sweat, it shows that body part is doing a good part of the work. If it were just from moving, he'd be sweaty all over. My horse always has more butt sweat if he's been working in the proper frame versus running around out in fields goofing off.
     
    05-09-2011, 08:00 PM
  #30
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
If it's localized sweat, it shows that body part is doing a good part of the work. If it were just from moving, he'd be sweaty all over. My horse always has more butt sweat if he's been working in the proper frame versus running around out in fields goofing off.
Same with my goof. We used to only sweat along the chest and shoulders. Which was back when he pulled heavy on his forehand. His tush rarely lathered up. Now that he's working right, we get sweaty butt all the time and less sweaty chest.

Good post about the different food requirements. Certainly makes sense.

Unless your horse has not been working regularly, sweat between the hind legs isn't bad. However if your horse is unconditioned, you may be pushing him too far if he's really lathered/sweat running down his legs.
     

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