Galloping my horse - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 23 Old 01-01-2012, 05:33 PM
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I would suggest at least finding an experienced friend to help you with these things. Not saying you have to have lessons as I never have had a lesson and learned how to ride right, but I had a lot of experienced people to help me along the way. Or do some research about riding
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post #12 of 23 Old 01-01-2012, 05:51 PM
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I agree with finding an experienced friend to ride with. I was also one of there's non lesson riders until I could afford to pay for them my own. I was a good rider before, but a better rider after.

The canter is like a rocking horse motion. You will need to relax your hips and back to flow with the horses movement. KEEP YOUR HEELS DOWN. That applies to every time you are on a horse, your heels must be down and your toe forward, not out to the side.

To ask the horse to slow down sit deeply in the saddle and pull back on the reins with gentle pressure. Increases the pressure if the horses isn't responding.

Watch all the instructional videos you can. YouTube can help you out a lot. I strongly suggest you learn the emergency stop. YouTube will also help.

This is A good video for the emergency stop.

YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.

The best thing for you to do would be to get lessons, but if you're not able to or do not want them, please keep coming back here with questions. I'd rather you be getting some sort of help rather than none at all.

When In Doubt Let Your Horse Do The Thinkin
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What Lone said.
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post #13 of 23 Old 01-01-2012, 06:01 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Lonestar22 View Post
I agree with finding an experienced friend to ride with. I was also one of there's non lesson riders until I could afford to pay for them my own. I was a good rider before, but a better rider after.

The canter is like a rocking horse motion. You will need to relax your hips and back to flow with the horses movement. KEEP YOUR HEELS DOWN. That applies to every time you are on a horse, your heels must be down and your toe forward, not out to the side.

To ask the horse to slow down sit deeply in the saddle and pull back on the reins with gentle pressure. Increases the pressure if the horses isn't responding.

Watch all the instructional videos you can. YouTube can help you out a lot. I strongly suggest you learn the emergency stop. YouTube will also help.

This is A good video for the emergency stop.

YouTube - Broadcast Yourself.

The best thing for you to do would be to get lessons, but if you're not able to or do not want them, please keep coming back here with questions. I'd rather you be getting some sort of help rather than none at all.
couldnt find the video there
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post #14 of 23 Old 01-01-2012, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by mildot View Post
I would just suggest you take lessons. Strongly.
I'm with mildot on this one. You better know how to ride/control the horse before trying cantering. I've seen the quietest gelding getting excited and speeding up under my beginner friend. When she managed to stop him she just sled off his side and feet obviously didn't hold her well enough. I'm self-learned rider myself, but things can go wrong.

IF you are absolutely sure you'll be able to control the horse and its very well trained, well, may be it would be OK. But canter is often a gait of excitement for many horses (even well-trained ones).

If you are absolutely against the trainer then as suggested at least try it first in ring or take a very experienced friend with you, who'll be able to control own horse and stop the canter if needed.
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post #15 of 23 Old 01-01-2012, 06:09 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by kitten_Val View Post
I'm with mildot on this one. You better know how to ride/control the horse before trying cantering. I've seen the quietest gelding getting excited and speeding up under my beginner friend. When she managed to stop him she just sled off his side and feet obviously didn't hold her well enough. I'm self-learned rider myself, but things can go wrong.

IF you are absolutely sure you'll be able to control the horse and its very well trained, well, may be it would be OK. But canter is often a gait of excitement for many horses (even well-trained ones).

If you are absolutely against the trainer then as suggested at least try it first in ring or take a very experienced friend with you, who'll be able to control own horse and stop the canter if needed.
oh yeah no doubt I talk to experienced people and get help from them when time permits
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post #16 of 23 Old 01-01-2012, 06:17 PM
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Ooops sorry.

One Rein Stop - YouTube
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post #17 of 23 Old 01-01-2012, 06:31 PM
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getting a fast trot it not going to help at all, you can get a canter from a steady trot. You don't need a trot that out of control. Get a nice trot, once its consistent go into a turn and sit the trot if you were posting and give a firm nudge, if you on a corner you horse should go straight into a canter. You don't need to lean froward if yo cantering, sitting back is better.. but if you galloping.. yes lean forward.
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post #18 of 23 Old 01-01-2012, 06:40 PM
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if you want tyour horse to canter give it its head while youare asking or else it might get confuse about what you want. If there is anyone at your barn that can give ou a few tips, go ahead! I hope you get it down and have fun with your horse!!!!!
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post #19 of 23 Old 01-01-2012, 06:48 PM
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When you don't know what you are doing on horseback, your horse pays for your mistakes and heavy handedness.

Working with a trainer or instructor makes progress MUCH faster than trying to figure things out on your own. That much is indisputable.

Which means that your horse has to suffer much less when you figure things out with someone who really knows what they are doing.

How many times have we seen uneducated riders reefing on a horse's mouth to make him stop or turn?

Unless your horse is out of control, pulling on his mouth is completely unnecessary to make him slow down. A simple shift in weight and a tightening of the back muscles, as well as firming the grip on the reins (without ever pulling back) is more than enough to bring a horse back to a trot from a canter and from a trot to a walk. Adding half halts to the equation makes the down transitions smooth and pleasing for both the horse and rider.

But you can't really learn a half halt by yourself because you don't know how a horse feels when you do it right. An instructor can tell by looking at the horse when you do a down transition correctly and tell you the moment it happens. THEN you can connect the dots and start working on repeating the aids the same way to get that feeling.

It's not fair to the horse to subject them to brute force just because one does not know better.

You don't necessarily need to pay for lessons each and every week, but at some point you need to pay for a few to get a new technique figured out. This, IMO, is one of those times.

Last edited by mildot; 01-01-2012 at 06:50 PM.
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post #20 of 23 Old 01-01-2012, 07:00 PM
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when I got my QH I had my TWH and I had my mom ride my TWH and had her take off (after warming up(and after a month of having him)) and I held him back and kicked him an dgave him his head and he took off gaining on my TWH. After that I would take him to a feild (plowed) and take him to the far end and push him into it until we went a half mile and slow him down and cool off on the way home.
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