Giving lessons , oh so much to learn! - Page 2
 
 

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Giving lessons , oh so much to learn!

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        08-25-2011, 10:00 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Haha! Well I'm sure you'll do great. I know I felt bad for the kids I was trying to teach (it was a summer camp at our barn) just bc some things after learning them as a 3/4 year old came naturally to me but I didn't know how to explain!
    Anyway, I'm sure you can do, & can teach so you'll do great. With anything else- Practice makes perfect :)
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        08-25-2011, 10:56 PM
      #12
    Showing
    Wooo go Tiny!! :)

    I am also a teacher, but for autistic children at a therapy barn. Though I do have one particular student that I have brought from mediocre inconsistent trots... to developing a seat, soft bending, solid legs and flexible/soft arms, wrists, hands... He just began to canter and he has the hardest horse to ride.
    He is doing so well and I couldn't be more proud.

    That horse is beginning to learn the more advanced equitation.. she's a step up from green.. yay!

    I love teaching :) And I'm told I am very good at it. It's just a matter of breaking things down.. settling for one good thing rather than 50 little things all done so-so.

    It even helps YOU ride better, especially when you're about on the same page!
         
        08-26-2011, 02:53 AM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
    Wooo go Tiny!! :)

    I am also a teacher, but for autistic children at a therapy barn. Though I do have one particular student that I have brought from mediocre inconsistent trots... to developing a seat, soft bending, solid legs and flexible/soft arms, wrists, hands... He just began to canter and he has the hardest horse to ride.
    He is doing so well and I couldn't be more proud.

    That horse is beginning to learn the more advanced equitation.. she's a step up from green.. yay!

    I love teaching :) And I'm told I am very good at it. It's just a matter of breaking things down.. settling for one good thing rather than 50 little things all done so-so.

    It even helps YOU ride better, especially when you're about on the same page!

    Good thing to remember!
    My son has Aspergers Sydrome and my niece is autistic. I have personal expereince with Autistic spectrum disorders.
         
        08-26-2011, 10:13 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by QH Gunner    
    I appreciate people who give lessons. I tried for a few months & I was just no good at it haha! Just beginners, but still.. I couldn't remember to tell them everything that I knew.
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    The bold is the part I actually have to be careful of when I try to help out friends.
    It's tempting to tell them EVERYTHING I know, while they're still worrying about things like which direction is forward. I have to remember to step back to their level and not overwhelm them with too much.
         
        08-27-2011, 07:31 PM
      #15
    Super Moderator
    Amen!!!
         
        08-27-2011, 08:08 PM
      #16
    Showing
    I'm like Shenandoah as well. I keep a notebook and write down what points I want to be sure to hit and keep me on track. It also helps me keep in check my little ones who are too big for their britches and are always after trying that next new thing. I also take notes after lessons on what we accomplished and where work needs to be done.

    I'm sure you will do great! I enjoy your posts and advice on here.

    The whole "those that can't do, teach" I don't buy into that one...I'm more in the camp of don't have an instructor if "they don't 'p' on the pot".
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        08-28-2011, 02:47 PM
      #17
    Foal
    I nderstand what you mean completely! You think it will be so easy and then you have so many things you want to try and tell them at once.

    I am finding it challening in that aspect and in another one. I just started teaching lessons a couple of months ago when I moved to Germany. I am working at an eventing barn, and unfortunately my German is not very good at all, and the riders' English is the same. So trying to give directions and instruction can beome very diffiult. It involves a lot of hand signals, and me walking up to their horse and physically moving their position haha. It's getting better. My first lesson was terrible, the only German I knew for it was how to say walk, trot and canter.
    tinyliny likes this.
         
        08-31-2011, 01:21 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    Thumbs up

    Thumbs up to you for tackling teaching....i spent the summer trying to help my hubby's kids to ride,(just the basics as im seeing a trainer myself :)) but have decided I need to find someone who specializes in training kids lol and ill be posting on diff. Catagory later on how to fix what they trained the horses...rrrg...
         
        09-02-2011, 11:08 PM
      #19
    Super Moderator
    I gave another lesson yesterday to Iz. She was a bit distracted, which I have come to realize is a normal state for a 14 year old. Tired, she says. Now I remember how tired I was all the time at 14. Growing up is exhausting.

    We worked on haveing her follow the horse's mouth. She has training in hunters, so she is not used to having enough contact to be able to really follow the horse's mouth smoothly. I had her on a circle walking around me, Now, follow the horse's mouth, shorten your rein, I want to see your elbow moving a bit to follow, not your hands . Now, tickle with the inside rein and get a flex to the inside, when you see this, leg on and step him into the flex and feel him step into the outside rein and kind of "catch" him and go with him.

    Way too much. But I don't know how to seperate it. Still , over and over and over and she started to get it! She even smiled. Then we took that and tried to work that into a canter depart. She couldn't keep the horse together through the canter depart, but she got him back together for three strides, and I saw that pretty picture of a horse softly bent to the inside, stepping up to the contact , flexed at the poll , rider following the mouth and elbows at her side and sitting up straight . . It was beautiful! I said "that's it! Thats' it! Can you feel it?" and she did, she smiled and recognized the feeling and that was the end of our lesson. Awesome lesson!


    Also, if you could look at another thread
    shoulder position in hunt seat?
    Have with a question on hunt seat
         
        09-05-2011, 05:42 PM
      #20
    Foal
    We worked on haveing her follow the horse's mouth. She has training in hunters, so she is not used to having enough contact to be able to really follow the horse's mouth smoothly. I had her on a circle walking around me, Now, follow the horse's mouth, shorten your rein, I want to see your elbow moving a bit to follow, not your hands . Now, tickle with the inside rein and get a flex to the inside, when you see this, leg on and step him into the flex and feel him step into the outside rein and kind of "catch" him and go with him.


    This is what I've been working on with Tango, he doesn't like to bend in the corners. Anyhoo, sounds like you're doing great, keep up the good teaching!!
         

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