Head bobbing while cantering
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Head bobbing while cantering

This is a discussion on Head bobbing while cantering within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Head nodding due to saddle fit
  • Head bob dressage

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-01-2012, 09:26 AM
  #1
Foal
Head bobbing while cantering

So I've had my tb mare since June last year. She's been getting fatter over the winter so this spring I started working her a lil more for show season. We went to our first show in April and she did great. Acted perfect, rode perfect. Couldn't be more happy. But as of recently, while we're cantering she wil bob her head up and down. I know they should do a slight bob while cantering but she is really bobbing. She just started to do this about a week or so ago. It's kinda annoying and hard to keep my hands still when she does that. Any ideas???
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-01-2012, 10:52 AM
  #2
Foal
Check her teeth. When my Hans started bobbing his head more than normal, he needed the dentist. Also double check the saddle, if she's gained a alot of weight, does it still fit well?
Good luck!
     
    05-01-2012, 11:28 AM
  #3
mls
Trained
Every stride? Every other stride? More information needed before advice can be given.
     
    05-01-2012, 06:48 PM
  #4
Foal
It's every stride. And ya her saddle still fits properly. I've checked that. I'll try to check her teeth tonight when I go out. But not sure I'll be successful or not. Lol
     
    05-01-2012, 07:00 PM
  #5
Super Moderator
Could she be lame?
     
    05-01-2012, 09:25 PM
  #6
Trained
If she's on the forehand, her head with bob as she tries to keep balance. If you watch a school horse cantering around with a beginner on board, its head will be bobbing quite distinctly due to it's weight being on its forehand.
Otherwise, certainly rule out soreness (teeth particularly) and lameness. Does she trot out even on a hard surface?
     
    05-01-2012, 09:32 PM
  #7
Super Moderator
And if you have her moving too slow - she will bob to try to keep her balance. Especially if she's heavy on the forehand.
     
    05-01-2012, 10:25 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
If she's on the forehand, her head with bob as she tries to keep balance. If you watch a school horse cantering around with a beginner on board, its head will be bobbing quite distinctly due to it's weight being on its forehand.
Otherwise, certainly rule out soreness (teeth particularly) and lameness. Does she trot out even on a hard surface?
What do you mean trot out on a hard surface? And no she's not lame. But that would make sense her bobbing to keep her balance when I go slower but she also does while regular speed but not as derasticlly. But when I let her go and gallop she doesn't do it. I'm Gina have the vet come out and check her teeth just to make sure she doesn't need a float.
     
    05-01-2012, 10:58 PM
  #9
Trained
Trotting her out in hand, so run along next to her, on a hard surface like pavement or bitumen. Get someone that knows how to pick lameness to watch you do this from the front, side and back.

If you're getting the vet out to do her teeth, get them to do a quick flexion test or lameness examination while they're there. It won't cost much extra as it's a very simple procedure.
     
    05-01-2012, 11:04 PM
  #10
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
Trotting her out in hand, so run along next to her, on a hard surface like pavement or bitumen. Get someone that knows how to pick lameness to watch you do this from the front, side and back.
Or post a video of her trotting out on here.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Head Bobbing dhess Horse Training 12 03-22-2012 11:37 AM
Head bobbing??? HarleyWood Horse Health 11 10-18-2011 12:36 AM
Head bobbing Loyalty09 Dressage 24 07-19-2011 12:37 AM
Head Bobbing Sketter English Riding 6 10-17-2009 10:44 PM
Head bobbing? What does it mean? Eventer4545 Horse Training 10 12-12-2007 01:21 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0