A helmet may save your life - Page 4
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

A helmet may save your life

This is a discussion on A helmet may save your life within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        07-16-2011, 04:01 AM
      #31
    Foal
    If an adult chooses not to wear a helmet that is their choice, but a child should be taught to wear one and the reasons why. No child or teen should risk a head injury because an adult made a poor choice for them. I think the subject is a very important one. I'm a registered nurse and if you saw the preventable accidents I've seen, you might think a bit differently.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        07-16-2011, 09:15 AM
      #32
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Freda    
    If an adult chooses not to wear a helmet that is their choice, but a child should be taught to wear one and the reasons why. No child or teen should risk a head injury because an adult made a poor choice for them. I think the subject is a very important one. I'm a registered nurse and if you saw the preventable accidents I've seen, you might think a bit differently.
    So should no child be allowed to ride using an English saddle? They don't have the 'safety features' of a western or Australian stock saddle.

    Should no child be allowed to jump? Remember, skipping a helmet increases risk 2X, but jumping increases risk anywhere from 10-80X - so should we ban jumping by children?

    Should children be banned from speed sports, such as barrel racing? Should children be taught to go no faster than a trot, and banned from doing so when in an arena and under supervision?

    A helmet is not a cure-all. If you tumble head first, it reduces your chance of serious head injury by 50%. But if you ride with a forward seat, you increase your chance of tumbling head first by more than 50%.

    I would be willing to be a deep seated Australian stock saddle would reduce the odds of a forward tumble far more than 50%, so should stock saddles be mandatory for everyone under 18?

    Shoot, getting on ANY horse is, according to studies, significantly more dangerous than riding a motorcycle - so should kids be banned from riding, period?

    Helmets aren't magic. They are only ONE risk reduction tool, and a minor one compared to riding style, saddle, horse selection, environment, etc.
         
        07-16-2011, 09:29 AM
      #33
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    So should no child be allowed to ride using an English saddle? They don't have the 'safety features' of a western or Australian stock saddle.

    Should no child be allowed to jump? Remember, skipping a helmet increases risk 2X, but jumping increases risk anywhere from 10-80X - so should we ban jumping by children?

    Should children be banned from speed sports, such as barrel racing? Should children be taught to go no faster than a trot, and banned from doing so when in an arena and under supervision?

    A helmet is not a cure-all. If you tumble head first, it reduces your chance of serious head injury by 50%. But if you ride with a forward seat, you increase your chance of tumbling head first by more than 50%.

    I would be willing to be a deep seated Australian stock saddle would reduce the odds of a forward tumble far more than 50%, so should stock saddles be mandatory for everyone under 18?

    Shoot, getting on ANY horse is, according to studies, significantly more dangerous than riding a motorcycle - so should kids be banned from riding, period?

    Helmets aren't magic. They are only ONE risk reduction tool, and a minor one compared to riding style, saddle, horse selection, environment, etc.
    I couldn't have said it better.....
         
        07-16-2011, 10:38 AM
      #34
    Trained
    I ride in a dressage saddle, with the proper 'classical' position. When I'm jumping, I remain in the proper 'classical' position between fences and only bring my position forward FOR the jumps. Does that mean I'll never be a top-level eventer, because I won't stay in two-point for the course? Maybe. But, it also means I'm a lot less likely to be killed because my horse refused and I was thrown into the 5'+ solid log and broke my neck.

    HOWEVER. It doesn't mean I can't have a nasty fall. A few months ago now, I did have a nasty fall, and I mean real nasty. I firmly believe my helmet saved my life. My pupils were not the same size for days afterwards, and I fractured the top of my humerus. As for the helmet, well, it was in far worse shape - MASSIVE cracks in the lining. We were galloping, I lost my stirrups when Monty jumped a ditch (which I should have expected, seeing as he is an eventing horse), and because of that, couldn't stop him, because I couldn't ask him to slow down in the way he's been trained to slow down. So I gradually slid off and ended up coming off on very hard ground. He hadn't slowed up at all so imagine hitting hard ground at a fast gallop... yeah it hurt.

    I distinctly remember getting up and walking after Monty, thinking it would be bad if he got to the road, but knowing I wouldn't be able to do anything about it. I remember realising, quite some time later, that my head hurt, pulling off my helmet, and walking onwards. I also remember, some time later, realising my arm hurt, and holding that across my body to reduce the pain. After that, total blank until arriving at the hospital in a stranger's car. I recall thinking that if I wasn't hurt and dizzy, I'd have cleared off ASAP, because I didn't know the guy and I didn't know if he was the sort of person who would take advantage of an injured girl. Plus, I look hot in joddies (the bf thinks I should live in riding gear - what he doesn't know is that I actually do).

    So they gave me real strong painkillers at the hospital because I really was in a lot of pain, and about 10 minutes later I went totally out of it again. They thought it was from the painkillers but I think it was probably from my head injury. I wasn't allowed to ride until my arm was better, and I wasn't allowed to canter or jump for a month - mother imposed that one. Lots of new rules were imposed after that one and they haven't all been slackened yet. I'm still not allowed to ride alone and I'd been doing so for two years previously with no issues at all, never even a fall.

    Monty is by far the best horse for me out of all the horses I've ever had or ridden, theoretically. He has the education, the temperament, all the right things that I need in a horse. He has the right personality too - bold, brave, but just a little bit sensitive. And yet, he is the horse I have had the worst falls from. I think the reason he is the best horse for me is that he made me realise that as great as I thought I was (as good as I was/am) I still needed a coach. And my coach is amazing, I have learned so much in such a short amount of time. I wish he would let me jump and ride Monty round but hey, we'll get there.
         
        07-16-2011, 10:54 AM
      #35
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    So should no child be allowed to ride using an English saddle? They don't have the 'safety features' of a western or Australian stock saddle.

    Should no child be allowed to jump? Remember, skipping a helmet increases risk 2X, but jumping increases risk anywhere from 10-80X - so should we ban jumping by children?

    Should children be banned from speed sports, such as barrel racing? Should children be taught to go no faster than a trot, and banned from doing so when in an arena and under supervision?

    A helmet is not a cure-all. If you tumble head first, it reduces your chance of serious head injury by 50%. But if you ride with a forward seat, you increase your chance of tumbling head first by more than 50%.

    I would be willing to be a deep seated Australian stock saddle would reduce the odds of a forward tumble far more than 50%, so should stock saddles be mandatory for everyone under 18?

    Shoot, getting on ANY horse is, according to studies, significantly more dangerous than riding a motorcycle - so should kids be banned from riding, period?

    Helmets aren't magic. They are only ONE risk reduction tool, and a minor one compared to riding style, saddle, horse selection, environment, etc.
    This. Completely and totally this.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        07-16-2011, 10:58 AM
      #36
    Trained
    I forgot to say, I am pro-choice on the matter of helmets, though I personally believe it is smarter to wear them, and definitely any person under the age of 18 should have to.

    I wear a helmet when I'm handling! My baby is young and gets frightened easily (she is quiet but lots of things scare her because she's a baby and hasn't learned they don't bite), and when she gets scared she crowds. Ever seen a cartoon of a horse leaping into his owner's hands? She just about tries to do that. Therefore, helmet = necessary part of foal-handling gear.
         
        07-16-2011, 11:42 AM
      #37
    Super Moderator
    [QUOTE=bsms;Helmets aren't magic. They are only ONE risk reduction tool, and a minor one compared to riding style, saddle, horse selection, environment, etc.[/QUOTE]


    Yes, they are only one risk reduction tool, and minor in that they are probably the cheapest risk reduction tool, the easiest to use and have the "biggest bang for the buck".

    Children have developing brains, and my perhaps more subsceptable to damage, though I also hear that they are more likely to heal than adults.
    But it is only natural for us to want to protect out children.

    YOu cannot mitigate every possible risk, but a helmet is so easy to wear and in one click of the chin strap can cut down the possible damage factor by so much, that to me , it's a no-brainer (pun intended).
         
        07-16-2011, 12:35 PM
      #38
    Trained
    Let's ride!!!!



    Sorry...just saw this picture posted on the Internet in a news forum, and gave in to temptation to post it here. No offense meant to anyone! As a parent and grandparent, I understand the desire to protect our kids...and I also remember the far distant past, when young kid bsms did all the wrong things anyways. How I lived to get old, I'll never know. Maybe I didn't have enough brain cells to injure. Maybe I destroyed them all when I tried to ride my bicycle off of the roof. Without a helmet, although that wouldn't have helped what hurt...no idea how I ended up having kids.

    If you look at my horse pictures, you'll see my youngest daughter and I both use helmets. By choice.
         
        07-16-2011, 01:01 PM
      #39
    Super Moderator
    That is a hoot! I never find neat photos like that.

    And, for what it's worth, I am for helmets optional for riding on your own, not on a barn's property where liability issues might get the owner sued.
         
        07-16-2011, 06:09 PM
      #40
    Weanling
    For me, when I'm at the barn, I wear a helmet. I'm on a 17 hand warmblood in an english saddle that is basically built to allow a rider to leave their seat. So yeah, I wear one. Plus I don't think they'd let anyone ride without one.
    If I'm poking down a trail? I don't wear one. I need my cowgirl hat to keep the sun out.
    Yeah I know it's a risk, but if I wanted an hobby with zero risk, I'd take up sewing or scrapbooking. Lol
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Save A Life,Horse Rhythm Beads. BlackAmethyst Tack and Equipment Classifieds 0 11-01-2010 03:14 PM
    Save A Life,Horse Rhythm Beads. BlackAmethyst Tack and Equipment Classifieds 6 11-01-2010 10:48 AM
    Any tips on how to save a life? trIplEcrOwngIrl General Off Topic Discussion 13 03-28-2010 01:02 AM
    How to save a life LittleBelgian Horse Talk 2 02-23-2010 09:18 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:19 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0