Help
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding

Help

This is a discussion on Help within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        05-22-2009, 03:32 AM
      #1
    Yearling
    Help

    Ok, the lessons are going great. My confidence is pretty good. But trotting...I am so bad at it. I stay up too long and then sit down, then get up and stay too long again. But one thing I find hard. Every time I push a horse or pony into a trott, when they begin going faster, I get nervous as I feel they are going too fast and I think they are going to bolt with me...What can I do to stop the nervousness. I hate it so much! I feel like such a weakling to be nervous. What can I do?
    I got a lesson tomorrow so would love to know what I could do tomorrow's lesson to not be nervous while trotting....
    P.s. I would love some videos of people trotting coz I would be able to see their rythm and know what I'm doing wrong..
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        05-25-2009, 11:05 AM
      #2
    Yearling
    <-- This video may be helpful to you. =]
    As for staying up too long, you may be posting too high. Try to think of it like your butt is glued to the saddle and once it's out of the saddle, it's got to come back down!
         
        05-25-2009, 11:07 AM
      #3
    Yearling
    Oh, and about the nervourness? I know the feeling. The pony I school sometimes bolts all the time, and I find myself half-halting so much.. If you think your horse is going to fast, I find it easier to ask my instructor, "Is he going too fast or is it just me?" Just give him a little squeeze on the reins and then release so he'll slow down, but won't walk. ;]
         
        05-25-2009, 11:42 AM
      #4
    Trained
    I am going to highly suggest Lunge Line Work. There is so much you can accomplish while on the lunge line.

    Did you know that the Spanish Riding School Riders - of this elite riding acadamy, are put on the lunge line for a whole year with no reins before they can merge to riding on their own.

    No wonder they have phenominal seats and legs - I can only aspire to ride like them.

    Lune Line work does so much for the rider - this way you can focus on yourself and yourself only, without worrying about where your pony is going and how your pony is going.

    Make sure you do this with someone on the ground who has a very educated eye and quallified to work with you step by step.

    Too many coaches don't do this for their students, and I think it is a travesty.

    You obtain security, balance, a feeling for where your body is, you learn to feel where your horse is. You find your seat, your legs and how to use them as functional aids.

    I highly recommend Lunge Line Work. Even I get put on the Lunge Line and I've been riding for years. There is nothing wrong with going on the lunge. No one is too good for lunge line work.
         
        05-25-2009, 12:57 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    When you are posting, (this is my theory, I'm going to test it out tonight) it should feel more like kneeling then sitting and standing. That way your lower legs never move, your knee is the pivot point but you are not pinching. You are using your upper thighs to rise with the horses movement, not too high, then back down. If you're doing good but then feel like you're going to mess up go back to a walk. Then start over. If you are doing it right and going back to a walk when you start to mess up your body and mind gets used to only doing it one way (I said this was a theory right?) and eventually you will only be doing it right, almost subconsciously.
    I'll let you know how it works out for me. Let me know if it works for you.

    Oh, and I second the lunge work. I'm going to be doing privates as soon as my intsructor can find the time. This will be my last group for a few weeks.
         
        05-26-2009, 05:36 AM
      #6
    Yearling
    Thanks. I can't get lunging done as my riding instructor doesn't really do lunging....
    The video doesn't work..
         
        05-26-2009, 08:29 AM
      #7
    Weanling
    According to Jessica Jahiel books there are 3 parts to posting only one is the riders job. Up is the horses job and his movement will bump you upward. Gravity will bring you down. All you have to do is be balanced during these two movements the third part is what the rider is responsible for - forward motion when the horse bumps you up move your hips and pelvis forward - really exaggerate the movement at first. I agree with MIeventer doing this on a lounge so you just have to think of the post and not the speed of your horse. I love her books,, Jessica Jahiel, very helpful. So don't think of up down up down just forward hips when your up and balance.
         
        05-26-2009, 08:31 AM
      #8
    Showing
    As a western rider, I would suggest that you start working on a sitting trot. For me, it was much easier to learn to post after I had learned the horses movement at a trot. When I first started posting trot (I just learned from watching Dad and Brother) it was pretty hard for me to keep my time because I would stand way too far up in the stirrups and it was hard to get back down in time for the next stride. As for the horse speeding up, you may unknowingly be gripping with your legs because you are nervous and cueing the horse to go faster. If they start to speed up, just cue them lightly to slow down but don't ask for the stop. I agree with MIEventer, I think you would benefit from lunge line work but since that is out of the question........

    You might be interested in trying "Rhythm beads" They let you hear the horses gait so that you can focus on it easier. I think it would work just as well (and be cheaper too) to attach small bells on the breast collar or saddle to jingle with each step.

    The most important advice I can offer you is to BREATHE!!! The more you breathe, the more relaxed you will be. Slow deep breaths in through your nose and out through your mouth will work wonders on nerves. :)
         
        05-26-2009, 03:45 PM
      #9
    Yearling
    Smrobs, What you said makes me think of sleigh bells. Normally horses pulling a sleigh are worked at the trot. Brilliant. This comment is useless to the OP, but thanks, smrobs. That's going to help me with my trot. =)
         
        05-26-2009, 05:02 PM
      #10
    Green Broke
    Here is a really good video..

         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:02 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0