Hey, Am I being stupid? risky rides? - Page 2
   

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Hey, Am I being stupid? risky rides?

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        03-04-2012, 06:58 AM
      #11
    Banned
    I ride alone a lot and where I am based is quite isolated and of course no matter what you do and where you go there's intrinsic risk and the risk is increased doing what you do.

    The 2 things that concern me most is the fact you don't seem to take account for horse's footing and light.

    I'm thinking the fact you've posted to tell us what you're doing means though that you know it's not "normal" and have some concern.

    Do you know how to undertake a risk assessment?

    You need to identify the Hazards: The potential for harm.

    Then the Risk: The probability (or likelihood) of harm actually occurring and the severity of its consequences.

    Then you need to undertake the process of deciding on actions to be taken to reduce risk to an acceptable level by implementing control measures

    It's not sounding to me like you're actually taking anything into consideration with regard to the footing and awareness of your surroundings or tack failure or poor light and the ability for you and the horse to properly see where you are and what's ahead.

    You mention some things you take but you don't say such as how long you're out? How well do you know the area? How far are you travelling? How far are you from where people live?
    If you tell someone roughly what route you'll take? What approx time you're due back? What arrangements you've made if you don't get back at the planned time? E.g. Is there vehicular access for the person who knows where you've gone? Whether the woods are near roads and hence if you come off and the horse gets free if there's any potential increased risk there? What personal protective equipment are you wearing e.g. Hat? Safety body protector? Boots? High viz outerwear? Do you/should you carry a whistle? Map? Torch? Emergency provisions?
    Answer all that lot and I'll tell you whether IMO you're managing risk or taking unnecessary risks.
         
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        03-04-2012, 06:57 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hoopla    
    I ride alone a lot and where I am based is quite isolated and of course no matter what you do and where you go there's intrinsic risk and the risk is increased doing what you do.

    The 2 things that concern me most is the fact you don't seem to take account for horse's footing and light.

    I'm thinking the fact you've posted to tell us what you're doing means though that you know it's not "normal" and have some concern.

    Do you know how to undertake a risk assessment?

    You need to identify the Hazards: The potential for harm.

    Then the Risk: The probability (or likelihood) of harm actually occurring and the severity of its consequences.

    Then you need to undertake the process of deciding on actions to be taken to reduce risk to an acceptable level by implementing control measures

    It's not sounding to me like you're actually taking anything into consideration with regard to the footing and awareness of your surroundings or tack failure or poor light and the ability for you and the horse to properly see where you are and what's ahead.

    You mention some things you take but you don't say such as how long you're out? How well do you know the area? How far are you travelling? How far are you from where people live?
    If you tell someone roughly what route you'll take? What approx time you're due back? What arrangements you've made if you don't get back at the planned time? E.g. Is there vehicular access for the person who knows where you've gone? Whether the woods are near roads and hence if you come off and the horse gets free if there's any potential increased risk there? What personal protective equipment are you wearing e.g. Hat? Safety body protector? Boots? High viz outerwear? Do you/should you carry a whistle? Map? Torch? Emergency provisions?
    Answer all that lot and I'll tell you whether IMO you're managing risk or taking unnecessary risks.
    This is what concerns me too. It is our responsibility to not put our horses in harms way. I've seen some horrendous injuries to horses running through the woods in winter. Common sense and consideration for your horse should always be foremost in decisions, as well as for your own safety.

    With that said, I have in the past enjoyed riding in snow covered fields with moonlight. My horse also seemed to enjoy these jaunts. Riding on my trails in winter isn't a great option, as there is much water/ice and ledge not to mention many limbs and branches blown down during high winds, and then covered by snow. But, there are wonderful fields and dirt roads to enjoy during the winter.

    Glad you enjoy riding in the winter.
         
        03-04-2012, 07:23 PM
      #13
    Foal
    First, I live in MA, and I'm SOOO jealous you're outside in this weather. Being alone isn't what scares me about your post, people go out alone all the time and come back ok, it's the tracking of the moose. If you find the moose..and find it's a mother, and has a baby.. just saying..that moose will not hesitate to hurt you even though you're on your horse. :( Like everyone else said, you're being safe, just be a little more over cautious when it's winter in NE. :)
         
        03-05-2012, 06:28 AM
      #14
    Yearling
    Moose aren't so bad. The males in rut are known to attack more.

    The snow isn't very deep this year. I was nearly down to bare grass until these last 2 storms but I had tremendous thick patches of ice all over the pasture. I've got to assume that the trails are going to be the same. Bad enough where I was throwing ashes from the wood stove out there and dirty sawdust from the barn for traction.

    I wouldn't venture out on the snowmobile trails only because there has been no snow and they couldn't ride their sleds. Now they are going nuts out there with the little bit. I have a major snowmobile corridor that passes through my property and they are zipping fast. Trying to get all the miles they possibly can in before we melt again. Supposed to have 50 degree weather again by midweek.
         
        03-07-2012, 03:26 AM
      #15
    Foal
    Living somewhere that doesn't see snow or moose, I won't comment regarding that (although previous posts seem to contain sound advice).

    I used to carry my cell phone in a holster around my calf when I went on trails. It was sort of like the ipod accessories they have for jogging that fit around your arm. So there's an idea!
         
        03-07-2012, 07:34 AM
      #16
    Yearling
    Lot of times cell service is spotty at best in northern New England. I have none at the house. If I head out to my back gate I can get some. If I turn a certain way near the barn a text message might come in. I have to drive 15 miles to get clear reception. The mountains stop a lot. I don't even get any radio or tv signals out here.
         
        03-07-2012, 08:43 AM
      #17
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Radly    
    Hey, Am I being stupid?
    I'm new to horse and I have been riding for under 3 years.
    Ok, I try to ride ever day regardless of the weather or time of day or night.
    Yesterday, I was out riding in the woods off the trails in about a foot of fresh snow tracking a moose. When we were on the trails we were cantering most of the time. My horses get bored on trails and prefer to explore the woods. I like it too.
    Then last night I took my other horse out riding in the fields and around the pasture. Even with the cloud cover I could see ok with the fresh snow.
    So, here is my questions, is this high risk? Should I not be riding like this? And I ride alone most of the time.
    Nothing wrong with riding alone. Someone should know you're out and what general area you plan to be in and about what time you think you might be back, but you can keep that rather open ended.

    If you have signal in the area then a cell phone might be nice as a precaution, but keep in on you, not your horse.

    If you're going to go faster than a walk at night make sure of your ground. I usually limited my self to walking unless I was going across one of my fields. In the dark you can't always see things like a hole, wire, etc...

    My concern would be tracking a moose. Moose can be rather unpredictable and dangerous. Which could lead to galloping through the woods and the additional risks that presents.
         

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