hitting a horse?
 
 

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hitting a horse?

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  • Does hitting horses help with training
  • Hitting horse

 
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    11-15-2010, 08:06 PM
  #1
Foal
hitting a horse?

I wasnt sure where to post this but hopefully you guys can help me out here. I have been taking lessons for a little over a year. I am currently half leasing a horse at a nearby stable, where they also train horses. Now I haven't been exposed to a lot of trainers and instructors but some of the instructors I cam across would slap or hit the horse, yell at it, etc, which at first shocked me, but then they explained that the horse is big and barely feels it and you need to show dominance or else they would walk all over you (not literally) I didnt really like that but I kin dof understand it. Now the trainer at the barn I lease at is extremely physical with the horses. He hits them sooo hard and I've seen him kick the horses several times. One time my horse wouldnt move so he kicked him in the rear pretty hard. I love all animals and I am outraged that this would be considered "normal" in the horsey world. Isnt there a way to train them based on trust and respect rather than by fear an bullying? How can a horse trust you when you hurt it?:( can someone explain to me how common or normal this is?!
     
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    11-15-2010, 08:10 PM
  #2
Foal
It all depends. If you ask with your legs for the horse to move... and doesn't then ask harder... and harder... and harder until they do. Then reward them for when they do something correct.

I will also add that horses are huge animals. And most of the time if you baby them they will.... literally... walk all over you and hurt you.
     
    11-15-2010, 08:15 PM
  #3
Weanling
I disagree with excessive physical discipline, but I do believe that a timely smack, tap, bump or swat is totally fine. It is how horses communicate with each other and if your horse is pushing your buttons or trying to get away with disrespectful or inappropriate behavior, I think it's necessary to re-establish your place in the 'herd'.
     
    11-15-2010, 08:33 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fluffy Pony    
It all depends. If you ask with your legs for the horse to move... and doesn't then ask harder... and harder... and harder until they do. Then reward them for when they do something correct..
I totally get the idea of kicking when you're riding to get the horse to move, but this guy kicked him while he was on the ground. I also saw him kick several other horses. I guess it's the same idea it just seems so harsh to me. Especially since im so used to being around smaller animals, mostly dogs.
     
    11-15-2010, 08:41 PM
  #5
Foal
Well if your asking and asking and asking... and if the horse isn't listening to you and your not sure when to actually smack him on the butt.... sometimes and extra "HEY LISTEN!" from the ground helps with making sure your safe in the future .

Horses arn't all pink flowers and unicorns.... the wild west wasn't won by 'soft' people.... horses are big animals and in order for people to be safe around them you need to make sure they have your horse's attention and know your the leader.

Smaller animals... like dogs... are much easier to read partly because they want to please you all the time. Yes there are many horses out there that want please you also... but horses tend to have a huge lazy side of not wanting to work. And when that lazyness comes out its easy to lose your horse's attention since they will learn that your much smaller then they are.
     
    11-15-2010, 08:43 PM
  #6
Foal
Brewcrew, that video is so interesting! Again, I have been around dogs, and have worked with dogs my whole life, so horse behavior is soooo different to me. I want to learn more about it. Does anyone know of any good DVDs out there that would have more of this type of explanation of horse behavior?? Or any good books on the topic?
     
    11-15-2010, 08:47 PM
  #7
Foal
I would recomend John Lyons and Clinton Anderson training DVDs. I would not recomend Parrelli DVDs/program partly because much if their ideas are recycled and most of the time it gives new people in the horse world wrong ideas and makes them fearful of horses. But then again that's my two cents.
     
    11-15-2010, 08:47 PM
  #8
Foal
Fluffy, thanks for the reponses.
That's definitely my problem. Im a timid, soft-spoken person, and definitely NOT a leader. I have been told by several people im too soft and gentle with the horses and they will test me and use that to thier advantage. Is there any way to change that when its not in my nature?
     
    11-15-2010, 08:49 PM
  #9
Foal
Just learn how a horse thinks and why they react the way they do. The more you know on how a horse behaves the more comfortable you will be in the future on how to handle different stuff.
     
    11-15-2010, 08:49 PM
  #10
Trained
Punishment should be quick, effective, and appropriate for the action that causes it. It should never be out of frustration or anger, and should take place within the first 3 seconds. After that the horse can't connect the action and the punishment.

I will hit my horse. Usually in the neck or a quick swat to the mouth if they nip.
There is a particular horse at work that I will bring a driving whip with me when I go in her pen. I have to bring in another, less dominate, horse in from her pen and she will charge. Normally all I have to do is yell and make myself big and she backs off but I have popped her on the shoulder with it before.
     

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