Holding the Saddle horn
   

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Holding the Saddle horn

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  • Holding saddle horn on saddle
  • Are horses trained by a saddle horn

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    12-29-2013, 12:22 AM
  #1
Foal
Holding the Saddle horn

I haven't been riding long. I started breaking in my own horse with the help of a few trainers. My only problem is that I have started riding her in arena and she bucks and takes off a lot. So every time I take her to a trot I grab the saddle horn (I ride western). I also grab the saddle horn when she canters. I don't feel secure in the saddle at a trot or canter. I guess what I'm asking is how do I sit the trot and just feel more secure? Please keep in mind that I'm 15 and I taught myself how to ride so please don't criticize me for not knowing what to do. Thanks!
     
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    12-29-2013, 12:37 AM
  #2
Started
I'm not going to criticize you for not knowing what you're doing, but you really need to get help. I'm sorry to say that if you aren't stable enough with your riding to trot/canter without holding the saddle's horn, then you should not be training a green horse. You either need to get this horse into a serious training program while taking lessons yourself on a trained horse that does not buck or bolt, or sell this horse to someone that has the skills to train him and find a horse more suitable to your skill level.

This isn't me reflecting poorly on your abilities, but the fact of the matter is that you need a horse that you can learn on, and your horse needs a trainer that can work through his issues. They have a saying "Green on green= black on blue"- you need a steady, trained horse so that you can work on developing your seat and hands without worrying about what kind of shenanigans your horse might pull!
     
    12-29-2013, 12:42 AM
  #3
Super Moderator
I completely agree.
     
    12-29-2013, 01:00 AM
  #4
Foal
Like I said, I am getting help from a few different trainers. I ride her almost every other day and i'm confident in my riding abilities. I just can't seem to find a good seat in my trot/canter. I used to be able to post a trot very well but now that I'm riding her in the arena I'm expecting her to buck or bolt. It might be my new saddle and im just not comfortable in it yet. I would never ever consider selling her. She is my first horse and I've got her when she was a little under 2. I'm the only person who has ever worked with her or ridden her. I have been training animals all my life and I know what I'm doing. I can't put her in a serious training program as I don't have the money and she is only 2 and a half. The lady who owns the place where I bored is helping me train her as well as helping me with my riding skills. I really just want to learn how to sit the trot/canter.
     
    12-29-2013, 01:09 AM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Red    
Like I said, I am getting help from a few different trainers. I ride her almost every other day and i'm confident in my riding abilities. I just can't seem to find a good seat in my trot/canter. I used to be able to post a trot very well but now that I'm riding her in the arena I'm expecting her to buck or bolt. It might be my new saddle and im just not comfortable in it yet. I would never ever consider selling her. She is my first horse and I've got her when she was a little under 2. I'm the only person who has ever worked with her or ridden her. I have been training animals all my life and I know what I'm doing. I can't put her in a serious training program as I don't have the money and she is only 2 and a half. The lady who owns the place where I bored is helping me train her as well as helping me with my riding skills. I really just want to learn how to sit the trot/canter.
To learn to sit the trot/canter you need to take lessons on a different horse. You aren't confident in your horse, and that will affect your riding. Being around animals your whole life and training animals is MUCH different from breaking and training a horse. Horses are different from dogs, and fine tuning a broke horse is different from training and breaking a green horse from the ground up. You need to work on your seat with a trainer on a different horse. You're nervous about what your horse may do, and you can't focus on your own riding.
     
    12-29-2013, 01:28 AM
  #6
Trained
DuckDodgers has said it all so well.

Look I am over 50, have ridden off and on all my life, and I am a pretty good rider. I bought a great huge 9 year old horse that had just been broke, and it was a D I S A S T E R, like you I was nervous of him, and I ended up in hospital, badly hurt.

Was it his fault?

NOPE

It was mine, he needed someone with confidence to help him become the horse I know he can be, and I just hope that his new owner can undo the damage I did. I also help that I heal fully in mind and body to be able to enjoy the horse I should have bought in the first place, a Steady Eddy, BTDT horse who is very forgiving of me.
     
    12-29-2013, 01:37 AM
  #7
Super Moderator
The horse has big holes in his training at this point, and cantering him out in the big arena might be asking for trouble. If you cannot do your training work at a walk (my recommendation), then at least do trot work in a round pen, where he cannot get up to real speed. If he gets to bucking as his normal response, then you are basically "training" him to be a bucker.
     
    12-29-2013, 01:54 AM
  #8
Weanling
I'm not an expert by any means, but isn't 2 1/2 a little young to be riding her this often?

Horses usually run faster with more energy in a larger space. Maybe you can try riding her in a smaller riding ring. I ride in a small ring most of the time for my lessons, but when we go into the arena, the horse goes twice as fast at the trot. It's like he's on speed or something.

Also, I don't think there's anything wrong with grabbing that horn when you're learning. If you practice enough, you'll find your seat and not need the horn anymore. But I think it can become a crutch, so you have to force yourself not to grab it as much as you can. Make it a contest with yourself. Go 5 strides not holding, then 10 strides, then 15 ... until you can go all the way around without holding.

For me, the only way to totally gain my seat in a gait is to not be holding on, but I'm never comfortable doing that with a new gait right off the bat. It's a series of steps beginning with crutches like holding on and then gradually letting go of them.
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    12-29-2013, 01:55 AM
  #9
Weanling
Oh, and be sure you're wearing a helmet. :)
     
    12-29-2013, 02:05 AM
  #10
Yearling
I agree with everything everyone else has said, but I just want to add, if you're going to hang onto something hang onto the back of the saddle (cantle right) grabbing the horn throws your weight forward, and you end up even more off balance.
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