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This Horse needs help

This is a discussion on This Horse needs help within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        10-31-2011, 09:07 AM
      #11
    Started
    Sorry if this is long...
    1. You massaged all over his body and found no soreness!!! Correct... personally if the horse was in pain then he would have showed it with you touching him slightly. But some are more comfortable with hiding pain, which leads me to ask were you pushing into his muscles to get enough pressure to show a reaction?? And did you do it all over his body not just his back?
    2. The horse could be scared of the new surroundings. Maybe he was jumped place to place to fast and is nervous with who is alpha or who is his herd. He might think he is alone.
    3. In all honesty if the owner doesn't want to put in the money or time and you can't afford to take him yourself slaughter might not be bad for him. I hate to say it. But he doesn't sound like a mean horse just sounds like a scared one. I would say try an convince the owner to sell him to an experienced person or to a rescue to work on his behavior. I just think he has alot of issues right now and its more than you and your hubby can face together. He needs one on one right now to regain his confidence and trust. And it takes time and money to help a horse regain both.
    Sorry if ii wasnt any help. I wish you guys luck
         
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        10-31-2011, 09:23 AM
      #12
    Foal
    Thanks kait18 for your reply.
    1) yes I massaged all over into the muscle - no reaction.

    I'm hoping to convince the owner to let him stay till January. December I will have lots off time to spend with him - everyday. Also maybe by then I can convince the owner to spend some money (even if I pay half). If I can show any results it might be easier to convince owner to give the horse another chance.
         
        10-31-2011, 10:16 AM
      #13
    Foal
    First question: Are you the only woman who has worked with him?
    The reason I ask this is because I know a lot of horses that are perfectly fine around women, but do exactly the behavior you describe when a man is around them.
    How does he feel about lunging? Does he feel confident with it, or is he still nervous and flighty? And have you, and you alone, tried re-training him from the VERY beginning?
    From what I read here, this horse only trusts you and you alone. If you lunge him, and your husband tries to lunge him, odds are you are going to have a lot better of a response.
         
        10-31-2011, 11:09 AM
      #14
    Green Broke
    I can understand where the owner is coming from. No one can ride or handle this horse, bar you. You say you want a vet/chiropractor/dentist out but the horse won't let strangers touch him! How are they going to do their job? This horse just sounds very dangerous to me - in an emergency would someone be able to handle besides you?

    The owner has been more than generous offering to pay the board fees while you work with the horse considering they wanted to send it to slaughter. They obviously care, they have kept this horse for over a year, had other people ride it and they are at the end of their rope. I don't think it is fair for you to pressure them to pay more things at this point in time, even if you pay part - they are already racking up costs so you can work with the horse. Go ahead and ask if you want but that is my opinion.

    To me its come down to the point where you have to decide how much you care about this horse. If you like it enough, buy it, the way it sounds the owner might even give it to you, and then you can spend all the time and money you want on the horse.

    I understand you want to help this horse and it is definitely a noble gesture. But your husband could have gotten seriously hurt and I think you need to think rationally about this horse. I don't like the idea of slaughtering any animal, but is it worth the risk of people around him getting seriously hurt? Regardless of how he got this way, its the way he is now. If you care so much buy him, if you can't afford to board him put him on a spelling farm outside in the country side until you can.

    I don't think this horse is an easy fix. Whatever it takes its probably going to be a long process, you're not just going to go there one morning and he's going to be fine. What is it that you hope to achieve?
    palominolover likes this.
         
        10-31-2011, 03:27 PM
      #15
    Showing
    I've seen this before many times. The horse, in the past, was very perceptive about a person's fear. Horses can read people faster than any psychiatrist. I'd like you to take a comfy chair and a book and spend time near the horse, outside it's stall, inside it's pasture or paddock. Do this for at least 3 days and ask nothing of the horse. If he checks you out, good. If he's crowding you, move your chair. It's ok to keep a crop handy beside you in case he crowds you a little too much. He's learning to trust you. Don't do anything else with the horse except to offer feed if that's part of his routine. Let me know what happens and I will help you with the next steps. If you follow thro you will build a wonderful relationship with this horse.
         
        10-31-2011, 05:35 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    Personally I would have this horse put down. Although it may seem harsh there is ABSOLUTELY nothing you can do for him. He does not belong to you, and I highly suggest you don't buy him from the owners. He sounds incredibly dangerous, especially the part about him flipping over on your husband. You do realize your husband could have been seriously injured or even killed? This is not the type of horse to mess with. Sorry if that sounded harsh.
         
        10-31-2011, 08:49 PM
      #17
    Started
    This horse is not lost irrevocably: proof is that he now comes to YOU from pasture! That is a HUGE turnaround, & I congratulate you! This horse, like all horses, doesn't care how much a person knows till he knows how much a person cares, & he knows that you care, simple as that.

    Unless he finds the same heart-felt caring in another human, he's history; it couldn't be clearer. We all know the odds of that one aren't really good, unfortunately.

    No one knows your financial/time available/et al situation like you do, so you're the best judge of whether you can handle keeping him!

    There's no doubt in my mind, however, since he's come around to you so beautifully, that YOU would be able to get him safe & rideable. (not so sure about hubby; perhaps horse had a bad experience with a male(s)).

    If you decide you're going to keep him, I suggest that you get Parelli Level 1 home study course, find out the horse's innate "horsenality"(the quivering in the corner means he's quite right-brain introvert at this time, it seems), & so first the groundwork, & only after he's got that down pat, would you think about asking his permission (yes, you should ask permission) to swing a leg over his back.

    Let us know what you decide!
         
        10-31-2011, 09:06 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Please be very careful. Some horses are just wired wrong.
    If it doesn't work out please do this poor horse a favor & have him PTS instead of sent to slaughter. It sounds like his whole life is based on fear & how sad would it be that his last moments of life will be the ultimate terror.
    Maybe he would welcome a sedative, a kind hand & peaceful send off.
         
        10-31-2011, 09:25 PM
      #19
    Banned
    Do you have any pictures?
         
        10-31-2011, 09:47 PM
      #20
    Started
    If the horse is good with you on the ground work but the major riding issue seems to be the bit/bridle then you may have an option. I completely respect that you don't want to get on him (more so after flipping on your husband) but in order to see whether it is actually your husband or the bridle you need to try him as well. What about ground driving him for a while? See how he reacts to the bridle when YOU are the one working him or when there isn't any pressure on his back, it may help narrow down what the real issue is.
         

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