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Horse taking over

This is a discussion on Horse taking over within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        06-19-2011, 01:44 PM
      #11
    Trained
    Hopefully you can find the the help of a good trainer who can not only straighten your horse out, but also teach you to keep up his training. It sounds like you've slowly untrained this horse without realizing it. The good thing is, it's not hard to undo with a good trainer, and horses don't look back. Once you've established yourself over him again, you should be in a much better position. Good luck.
         
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        06-19-2011, 09:30 PM
      #12
    Foal
    He is about ten years old and I bought him from the same man who broke him in. I think because they were trail riding horses, max has only ever been with other horses and mostly just trotted and cantered. I am not too shore on how good the trainer was but he was like a bushman and didn't care much about helmets and things. He told us that max's teeth had never been checked before when we bought him and he said he is the only one that has cut their feet.
         
        06-19-2011, 10:27 PM
      #13
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsedreamerforheartland    
    He is about ten years old and I bought him from the same man who broke him in. I think because they were trail riding horses, max has only ever been with other horses and mostly just trotted and cantered. I am not too shore on how good the trainer was but he was like a bushman and didn't care much about helmets and things. He told us that max's teeth had never been checked before when we bought him and he said he is the only one that has cut their feet.
    So while he's with you, is he the only horse on the property? For a horse that has always been with other horses and is suddenly being asked to live by himself, that can be a big change but they will adjust to it after a while.

    Hmm, he's 10 years old and has never had his teeth checked? Did you have the vet come out and look at him before you purchased him?
         
        06-19-2011, 11:00 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    Are you sure you were ready for a horse before you got him?
         
        06-19-2011, 11:25 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by horsedreamerforheartland    
    He is about ten years old and I bought him from the same man who broke him in. I think because they were trail riding horses, max has only ever been with other horses ... I am not too shore on how good the trainer was but he was like a bushman and didn't care much about helmets and things. He told us that max's teeth had never been checked before when we bought him and he said he is the only one that has cut their feet.
    It's great that you realize there is a problem and that you seek help here.

    If I were you, considering what you said about the teeth, I would get a vet checkup ASAP. If teeth weren't done, nothing else probably was either. Secondly, you absolutely need a trainer if you don't know what to do about what you call his lack of respect, or you are slowly and surely creating a spoiled brat that will be useless to you and at worst will hurt you.

    I am certainly no expert as others here on this forum are, but for what it is worth, this is what happened to me.
    I am very new to horses, about 2 years now, and bought a mare back in February after leasing her for several months. After moving her to a new barn, fattening her up, getting her wormed and good care, she began acting up a little, and then kicked me once when picking up a back foot. That was it... I enlisted the help of a trainer who fortunately is at my barn, and after just a couple of days of ground work with her, she has improved amazingly fast. I work with her every day before I ride her. Now I also know what to do when she needs an attitude adjustment. And I am still learning from the trainer.
    Good luck, and let us know what happens!
         
        06-20-2011, 04:44 AM
      #16
    Weanling
    Just going to say..even if it's not the source of the problem, he needs his teeth floated. At 10, that's important. If he's got sharp spots, that could be causing some of his attitude under saddle.
    Secondly...from my very very limited experience..some and potentially all horses test constantly. You are the leader. Remind yourself of that.
    My farrier says to keep a hand on the hip while checking feet, that way you can push out of the way if you see a kick coming. Remember, the reward is when you let go. If he's just "threating" to kick by kind of waving it around, you usually can talk them out of it by making good and sure they're read to pick up by stroking first, and then holding onto the hoof while they work it out of their system. I haven;t had a ferocious kicker though--just a dramatic one who does it because she thinks she can. Check for soreness in his legs too--have you had a vet examine this horse at all? If not..that's the place to start.

    Additionally, get a trainer. A vet and trainer will be able to in person appraise more than an online forum as far as Max personality vs. his problems and causes.
         
        06-20-2011, 11:34 AM
      #17
    Trained
    I had a horse that was a dream when I got him, and started getting more pushy and horrid the more time that went on. He kicked Mum one day and she smacked him once on the rump. He never tried it again, because that smack was telling him that he wasn't allowed to do that, we're the bosses not him. It worked for HIM. It isn't something that works for all horses. You really just have to know your horse.

    If he's too much for you/shaking your confidence, then he's not the right horse for you. If you don't find him a different home, get some professional help on a regular basis (there are some very good groundwork instructors about, if you know where to look - one of them would help you a lot, I think).
         
        06-23-2011, 09:26 AM
      #18
    Foal
    Your rite it is mainly your confidence. But ifyou stop going near his legs yur leting him win. When he wins he will become more dominate. And dominate horses like to get more and more so untilthey control you.try going to the sides of his legs (so e can't really kick you) and just pat them or softly brush them. That way he will think that your not doing any thing bad. He should like it. I know my horse does. He should stop trying to kick you after a while too. As for the cantering and bucking. Get him to canter then if he starts bucking turn him to a fence or turn him in a circle and he will stop. Keep doing so until he gets bored with trying to buck you off and does as you tell him to. If this does not work get some one to lunge you, and canter alot on the lunge. Because he can't really buck while he's lunging. As for your horse not paying any attention to you, try keeping him in a different paddock to his friend(if you can) and catching him just to play, pat and brush him sometimes. That way you will spend time with him and will want to spen and pay more attention to you.

    I am so sorry if none of this works, but hopefully it will. Good luck with your horse.
         
        06-23-2011, 02:21 PM
      #19
    Banned
    I disagree with the person who says "sell." To me, that sounds like "give up." Work with someone. Build your confidence. You can do this, but it will take help and time. You took on this project. Now do it right, and see it through.
         
        06-23-2011, 02:29 PM
      #20
    Banned
    I am also going to add this, because I have read it in several places, and it is always true, but especially in this economy: every time you break your committment with a horse and sell him, especially with "he was too much for me; he acted up; he kicks, bucks, rears," etc., you are exponentially increasing his chances of ending up in a kill pen. You can't believe how fast even a successful racehorse can end up in a horrid place if it changes hands often enough.

    Get help, and stick by this horse. You obviously had some attraction to him to start. Focus on that. Work with someone good. Put in that daily committment it takes to own a horse (yes, it does!), and get him and yourself in shape for this. You can do it if you really want to, and for the horse's sake, do it.
         

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