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Horse won't move! (And not even trot or anything)

This is a discussion on Horse won't move! (And not even trot or anything) within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Old school horse doesnt feel like trotting
  • What if i switch to western and don't know english cues

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    07-23-2012, 06:55 PM
  #11
Nya
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
I find that putting weight in the heels (not keeping them dropped but relaxed) braces your seatbones and gives the opposite signal to "go". Are you thinking forward? Or just asking it?
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I actually kind of push my heels down in the stirrups, and that way I feel comfortable and balanced, and when I ask the horse to go, I feel like I'm thinking forward, too, because I really want to go a little faster
I try to put the feet tips in the stirrup and the heels down, I don't know if that can work the wrong way, I'm quite unexperienced
     
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    07-23-2012, 07:06 PM
  #12
Started
So, you are taking lessons in a western saddle and riding western and she put you on an english horse in an english saddle? First off, not me! Lol I hope you have ridden and learned in an english saddle before she did that as they are going to feel different. I am guessing it's just the horse as your cues are not what he knows. So, don't feel bad about it.. :) I would have been demanding a western saddle. LOL
     
    07-23-2012, 07:17 PM
  #13
Nya
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Appyt    
So, you are taking lessons in a western saddle and riding western and she put you on an english horse in an english saddle? First off, not me! Lol I hope you have ridden and learned in an english saddle before she did that as they are going to feel different. I am guessing it's just the horse as your cues are not what he knows. So, don't feel bad about it.. :) I would have been demanding a western saddle. LOL
I get both, english and western lessons(my true love is western, anyway), and that's only because the horses are assigned differently every time, and since in that centre the calmer and more obedient horses are the western ones, if there are children or new riders, they give us the "more difficult ones".
It's not fantastic LOL
     
    07-23-2012, 07:46 PM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nya    
I actually kind of push my heels down in the stirrups, and that way I feel comfortable and balanced, and when I ask the horse to go, I feel like I'm thinking forward, too, because I really want to go a little faster
Yes, but is this also causing you to sit more deeply in the saddle? It would if it were me, and this is my horse's cue to "stop" or "slow down". +1 on what Tinyliny said, especially the bump, bump - and maybe even a kick - and the crop.

This is a classic school horse trick, by the way. And even though it IS extremely annoying, you WILL learn some valuable things through the experience. I hated it the first time I encountered it, but the second time I did (a month or so later) I was able to appreciate how much the experience improved my riding.
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    07-24-2012, 04:55 AM
  #15
Nya
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThursdayNext    
Yes, but is this also causing you to sit more deeply in the saddle? It would if it were me, and this is my horse's cue to "stop" or "slow down". +1 on what Tinyliny said, especially the bump, bump - and maybe even a kick - and the crop.

This is a classic school horse trick, by the way. And even though it IS extremely annoying, you WILL learn some valuable things through the experience. I hated it the first time I encountered it, but the second time I did (a month or so later) I was able to appreciate how much the experience improved my riding.
Yes, that makes me sit deeply in the saddle, and I actually didn't know that could cause the horse to slow down or stop! I'll try to be lighter on the heels next time, and anyways, now that I read that it's not only me I feel sooo much better! And if this improves my experience more.. then I was not wasting my time strugglin to make the horse move
Thanks a lot
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    07-24-2012, 07:34 AM
  #16
Weanling
Old schooling horses have a special place in my heart for sure. :) It is quite possible that he knows what he is doing an didn't feel as if you were "ready". Horses can tell the difference between a balanced, confident rider and one who isn't. Maybe you were trying so hard and a bit nervous from being on a new horse in a new saddle that subconsciously your were projecting that, even though you thought you were doing everything right?

This happens to everyone and to me is sounds like you have a really good horse to learn on. Plus, when you finally get it is will mean you have progressed up and it will feel so good. Keep at it and I'm glad you are back riding again. :)
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    07-24-2012, 07:47 AM
  #17
Yearling
The results of sitting deeply depend on what you're doing with your legs and your hands too. For example, if I sit deeply and squeeze my hands on the reins very briefly, and then reach back with my outside leg and touch my horse's side, he'll break into a canter. If I sit deeply and squeeze my hands on the reins firmly and take my leg off, he'll stop and stand still.

You talk to your horse with your seat, your legs, and your hands. Your horse feels every little thing you do with all three of them. If you squeeze your butt muscles even a little, he feels it. If you wriggle around in the saddle, he feels it. If you put both reins in one hand and scratch your ear, he feels it. It's like, in English, we have 26 letters, and those letters get rearranged and used over and over to make words, and then the words get rearranged and used over and over to make sentences, and ultimately, you can make a book.

Think of the different leg, hand, and seat pressures and positions as being an alphabet, and with that alphabet, you're "writing" requests that your horse can understand. He's a pretty good reader, so it's up to you to be a good writer. And just in the same way as I can describe something as a "crushing blow" I can mix up the signals and what I really say is a "blushing crow". Same letters, totally different meaning.

This, to me, is the hardest thing about riding well, learning all that stuff and keeping it straight. And I can *understand* it with my head, but still wind up doing it wrong with my body. That's where a good instructor comes in - that person can see what you are doing, and give you helpful suggestions about how to fix the part that needs fixing...without messing up the good part.

It's also why instructors will tell you that the aids need to be independent. That means that if you put your leg on, for example, it doesn't automatically cause your fingers to tighten around the reins. You may *want* to tighten your fingers on the reins, but that should be a decision, not something that just happens because you put a leg on. Having something happen with your seat just because you did something with your hands is how we get the blushing crow, above.

I know it's kind of long, but I thought it was important to be clear that it's not *just* sitting deeply that makes the horse stop...it's the whole package of stuff you are telling the horse at the same time with the other aids that combines with sitting deeply to make the horse stop.
     
    07-24-2012, 09:01 AM
  #18
Nya
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by uflrh9y    
Old schooling horses have a special place in my heart for sure. :) It is quite possible that he knows what he is doing an didn't feel as if you were "ready". Horses can tell the difference between a balanced, confident rider and one who isn't. Maybe you were trying so hard and a bit nervous from being on a new horse in a new saddle that subconsciously your were projecting that, even though you thought you were doing everything right?

This happens to everyone and to me is sounds like you have a really good horse to learn on. Plus, when you finally get it is will mean you have progressed up and it will feel so good. Keep at it and I'm glad you are back riding again. :)
I think you are right, that is a really sweet horse, and it was my first time on such a big one, and since I didn't feel really comfortable with the saddle and the stirrups, after a while I ended up feeling quite confused, even in my movements, and he probably felt it! I happen to have some problems every time I'm given an unknown horse, then the next lessons it's usually alright :)
On thursday I'll let you know what will happen
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    07-24-2012, 09:40 AM
  #19
Nya
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThursdayNext    
The results of sitting deeply depend on what you're doing with your legs and your hands too. For example, if I sit deeply and squeeze my hands on the reins very briefly, and then reach back with my outside leg and touch my horse's side, he'll break into a canter. If I sit deeply and squeeze my hands on the reins firmly and take my leg off, he'll stop and stand still.

You talk to your horse with your seat, your legs, and your hands. Your horse feels every little thing you do with all three of them. If you squeeze your butt muscles even a little, he feels it. If you wriggle around in the saddle, he feels it. If you put both reins in one hand and scratch your ear, he feels it. It's like, in English, we have 26 letters, and those letters get rearranged and used over and over to make words, and then the words get rearranged and used over and over to make sentences, and ultimately, you can make a book.

Think of the different leg, hand, and seat pressures and positions as being an alphabet, and with that alphabet, you're "writing" requests that your horse can understand. He's a pretty good reader, so it's up to you to be a good writer. And just in the same way as I can describe something as a "crushing blow" I can mix up the signals and what I really say is a "blushing crow". Same letters, totally different meaning.

This, to me, is the hardest thing about riding well, learning all that stuff and keeping it straight. And I can *understand* it with my head, but still wind up doing it wrong with my body. That's where a good instructor comes in - that person can see what you are doing, and give you helpful suggestions about how to fix the part that needs fixing...without messing up the good part.

It's also why instructors will tell you that the aids need to be independent. That means that if you put your leg on, for example, it doesn't automatically cause your fingers to tighten around the reins. You may *want* to tighten your fingers on the reins, but that should be a decision, not something that just happens because you put a leg on. Having something happen with your seat just because you did something with your hands is how we get the blushing crow, above.

I know it's kind of long, but I thought it was important to be clear that it's not *just* sitting deeply that makes the horse stop...it's the whole package of stuff you are telling the horse at the same time with the other aids that combines with sitting deeply to make the horse stop.
It's very good for me to know this, really, thank you so much! No one has ever explained this so clearly, and I had quite confused ideas about how I could manage to ask the horse different things! These things should always be explained to the new riders, it's not so easy to understand! :)
ThursdayNext likes this.
     
    07-24-2012, 10:17 AM
  #20
Foal
I am a very new rider so I don't have the good advice everyone else will give you, but I wanted to chime in and say that I am also having some issues making my horse go. They do not go like a car and I have had to change my expectation while I learn to speak horse language. So no advice, just some sympathy that I know where you are coming from.
     

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