How can a male get started on horse riding? - Page 14 - The Horse Forum
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post #131 of 296 Old 06-11-2013, 05:20 PM
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This thread kinda makes me feel like someone I do not know called me up and says "so, what are you wearing right now?".
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post #132 of 296 Old 06-11-2013, 06:42 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by nvr2many View Post
This thread kinda makes me feel like someone I do not know called me up and says "so, what are you wearing right now?".
What are you wearing right now?
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post #133 of 296 Old 06-12-2013, 01:59 AM
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Originally Posted by soenjer55 View Post
I disagree, lbs not miles. Boots aren't a relic from the past with no actual use for today- they are designed specifically for not just riding, but being around horses in general.
Once a pair of boots are broken in, they're perfectly comfortable for running around in. Trust me, I know, lol. They may not be as comfortable as shoes meant for walking, and you may not be able to go on a day-long hike, but you're not going to be doing too much walking if you're taking a horse lesson or riding a horse at all, really.
Riding boots also have a steel plate for your toes, which is important. I've had enough large horses stomp on my feet to know how important it is- I have a permanent dent in one pair of boots that would have been a broken toe or two if I hadn't had it.
Also, I think you're thinking of tall boots- the ones that go to the knee. Paddock boots only go to the ankle. They're reasonably priced, and, if you get a good brand, will last a long time with minimal to no care. One pair of Ariats has lasted for almost ten years and went through three people, with no care at all. The shoe laces were replaced frequently, and they don't look pretty, but they're perfectly functional and are still our spare pair.
Another thing is that most places I know of will not let you ride without proper boots. It's a safety thing, as they're designed specifically to be in a stirrup and have steel toes. I know many, many places that won't even let you around a horse without proper boots.
Honestly, if you're going to shell out the money, you may as well get boots meant for horses and riding. Maybe not right away, but you will have to eventually. The most important thing right now is to ask your instructor what they want you to have on, though, OP. Like I said, there are places that will let you ride in what you have for the first few lessons, and there are places that won't let you near the horses without proper footwear.

You are free to disagree , but if you're going to disagree you really shouldn't make my point for me.
A. "They may not be as comfortable as shoes meant for walking" You can add walking boots to that and I think I said the same thing already.
B. "you're not going to be doing too much walking if you're taking a horse lesson..." I think I said something along the same lines "If you're going to always do arena riding and never ride out very far so that walking very far would never be a possibility then boots might work ok"
However, if you do any serous riding that involves traveling a lot of miles you'll probably want to spend some time giving your horse a break by dismounting, loosening the cinch and walking them on a lead for a few miles during the day (or maybe not, depending on how hard you want to work your horse). If you do you'll be much happier with the comfortable walking foot gear that works equally well for riding vs riding boots.

I've had my feet stepped on plenty too (anyone who works with horses long enough can say that) and since most riding boots do not have steel toes they wouldn't have helped.
Ankle paddock boots are not "riding" boots anymore than my combat boots were (although my combat boots made excellent boots for riding), but plenty of ankle boots have steel toes. Unless you're saying that a boot you ride in is a "riding" boot, but that would have made my combat boots "riding" boots.
I've have well broken in riding boots (they look nice even if I don't ride with them), but after 10 years and being well broken in they're not as comfortable a pair of combat boots after 3 months of breaking in. Riding boots are never perfectly comfortable for running around it (unless you're not really "running" around and not doing very much). Trust me I know , that's why I followed the lead of other horsemen who knew before me and didn't wear "riding" boots.
My walking boots fit in the stirrup just as nicely as the riding boots so I don't see where there's any benefit to a riding boot (having a heel is not something unique to riding boots). Certainly not for safety or comfort (that just leaves "looks" and "tradition")
To date I've never had a problem riding anywhere with my foot gear and I doubt seriously if I ever would, since I usually were what was good enough for mounted troops 100 years ago. Although I have been places where my leggings got a lot of interest, but always of a positive nature. No one has ever questioned the boots I wear even though they aren't "riding" boots.

Most riding boots do not reach the knee. Somewhere around 14" if I remember correctly and that's well short of the knee (16" is still short of the knee). Although they do make them higher (usually for higher price) and they also make some closer to 12" (like most cowboy boots). But yes, those make up the bulk of the riding boots. Look at the foot gear on the competitors in most of the show, eventing, etc... circuits. High boots.

Nothing wrong with it. It's the traditional look/style and it works for what they are doing. If they stepped into the world of my riding for a few months they'd be wearing something different before very long , but many would switch back for their other riding.

They're always going to be bigger and stronger so you better always be smarter. (One of my grandfather's many pearls of wisdom)
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post #134 of 296 Old 06-12-2013, 03:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by its lbs not miles View Post
You are free to disagree , but if you're going to disagree you really shouldn't make my point for me.
A. "They may not be as comfortable as shoes meant for walking" You can add walking boots to that and I think I said the same thing already. They're not as comfortable, but my point was that they were still plenty comfortable enough to walk around in, once broken in, for the amount of walking he is going to be doing.
B. "you're not going to be doing too much walking if you're taking a horse lesson..." I think I said something along the same lines "If you're going to always do arena riding and never ride out very far so that walking very far would never be a possibility then boots might work ok"
However, if you do any serous riding that involves traveling a lot of miles you'll probably want to spend some time giving your horse a break by dismounting, loosening the cinch and walking them on a lead for a few miles during the day (or maybe not, depending on how hard you want to work your horse). If you do you'll be much happier with the comfortable walking foot gear that works equally well for riding vs riding boots. Like I said, although they aren't the ultimate standard for walking comfort, my Ariat paddock boots have been perfectly fine for walking in. I highly doubt that futuredoctor is going to be doing any riding extreme enough to warrant needing to get off and walk his horse long enough to need shoes more comfortable than riding boots. As you said, "if you do any serious riding that involves traveling a lot of miles..." which he will not be.

I've had my feet stepped on plenty too (anyone who works with horses long enough can say that) and since most riding boots do not have steel toes they wouldn't have helped. I have never had any riding boots without steel toes, and I have not found any so far that haven't, either. I am not saying that all riding boots have steel toes, but any decent ones should.
Ankle paddock boots are not "riding" boots anymore than my combat boots were (although my combat boots made excellent boots for riding), but plenty of ankle boots have steel toes. Unless you're saying that a boot you ride in is a "riding" boot, but that would have made my combat boots "riding" boots. I am going to exercise my right to disagree, once again. Paddock boots are very much riding boots. They are designed for that purpose. They are marketed for that purpose, and they serve that purpose. Paddock boots are the same as tall boots, they just don't come above the ankle.
I've have well broken in riding boots (they look nice even if I don't ride with them), but after 10 years and being well broken in they're not as comfortable a pair of combat boots after 3 months of breaking in. Riding boots are never perfectly comfortable for running around it (unless you're not really "running" around and not doing very much). Trust me I know , that's why I followed the lead of other horsemen who knew before me and didn't wear "riding" boots.
My walking boots fit in the stirrup just as nicely as the riding boots so I don't see where there's any benefit to a riding boot (having a heel is not something unique to riding boots). Certainly not for safety or comfort (that just leaves "looks" and "tradition")
To date I've never had a problem riding anywhere with my foot gear and I doubt seriously if I ever would, since I usually were what was good enough for mounted troops 100 years ago. Although I have been places where my leggings got a lot of interest, but always of a positive nature. No one has ever questioned the boots I wear even though they aren't "riding" boots.

Most riding boots do not reach the knee. Somewhere around 14" if I remember correctly and that's well short of the knee (16" is still short of the knee). Although they do make them higher (usually for higher price) and they also make some closer to 12" (like most cowboy boots). But yes, those make up the bulk of the riding boots. Look at the foot gear on the competitors in most of the show, eventing, etc... circuits. High boots.

Nothing wrong with it. It's the traditional look/style and it works for what they are doing. If they stepped into the world of my riding for a few months they'd be wearing something different before very long , but many would switch back for their other riding.
I am by no means saying that your boots are the wrong boots. I have ridden in many different types of shoes before I scraped money together for a good pair of riding boots for myself, and here I am, all my little toes in place and no worse for the wear. If I rode as you did, and needed a more comfortable boot for walking long distances over rough terrain, I'm sure I would have boots that suited that need, but I have always had my needs met by a simple riding boot.
But futuredoctor is not going to be riding the way you do- he's going to be taking lessons at a barn, where not only will he be subject to another's rules due to liability (which, like I said, will more than likely require that he has riding boots with steel toes, maybe not at first but eventually), but will not be doing anything that requires more walking comfort than what a regular riding boot offers. That is why I highly suggest that he buys a good pair of paddock boots- not because I think they're the only thing to ride in, but because they suit his needs better and offer a certain amount of safety. It seems that we both do not see eye to eye on what the definition of a riding boot is, and I don't think we're answering the question the same- I am answering with what I believe suits his needs best, while I think you're answering a bit more generally, giving different options.
I cannot and will not argue with you about what type of boot is best for the type of riding that you do, as I don't ride with you, and I am in no way saying that your boots are the wrong boots- they're just not suited for the OP's needs as well as a boot designed specifically for riding and working around horses. Like I said, the most important thing right now is that he ask the instructor what he needs to wear, as they may require him to buy a riding boot anyway. If they do not, then it's a good thing you're here, because I am not familiar with alternatives to riding boots, as my needs have always been met by a simple paddock boot and half chaps.
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post #135 of 296 Old 06-12-2013, 04:00 AM
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Dude, just ride! I have friend whp rides dressage in the heart of cow country. I asked him about this once. His answer was "a man that is not true to himself is not a man". I will be 100% honest when I say what I kow about English rdidng will fit on the back of a stamp written in sharpie. But I do know this. If you are confident in what you do, and are confident in who you are... to hell with everyone else!
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post #136 of 296 Old 06-12-2013, 04:26 AM
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OP, you do not have to go buy specific boots to try out riding, unless the facility requires it. Tennis shoes are not the best but the would work for your first lesson. As long as you don't wear flip flops or sandals, you shouldn't have to go buy a new pair of boots for one lesson. If you decide to continue them, then you should look into some boots. More than likely, you'd be riding a pretty calm lesson horse for your first rides. They usually don't spook that easy, especially in an arena.

You should also be ok with wearing jeans. Again, you don't need to go buy breeches just for one lesson. If you want to continue, then buy some.
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post #137 of 296 Old 06-12-2013, 07:19 AM Thread Starter
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I'll just wait and see what the instructor says. Ultimately it's her decision.
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post #138 of 296 Old 06-12-2013, 10:51 AM
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Well, since this is the first lesson and you are just trying things out, I would not spend a whole lot of money up front.

When my son and I first started riding (and we weren't sure we would continue) we were told that muck out boots would work. They're cheap, they have a heel and they protect the inside calf. Right now, I wear a pair of shoes/boots I found at the salvation army for $4 and a pair of half chaps. (I'm still cheap.)

Again, it does depend on what the barn demands. But other than the boots or footwear with heels, jeans and t-shirt should be fine. If you stay with it, then you might consider investing more in attire and all sorts of other horse paraphernalia (and there're endless possibilities there).

Right now, just stick your toe in the water and see if you like it.

Me, once I climbed on a horse seven years ago, I never got off. My son, who was the reason we started riding, really began enjoying riding when he relaxed going over fences. He's 17 now and a much better and bolder jumper than I am. I think, like a lot of guys, he's an adrenaline junky.

But the joy in horses (for me) is the connection and harmony between horse and rider. It's transcendent.

So just go for it and see if you like it. If you are as academic as you say, this is a perfect athletic outlet. Riding takes muscles, but you can start slow at the walk. It's amazing how much effort goes into just sitting on a walking horse.
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post #139 of 296 Old 06-12-2013, 01:00 PM
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didn't read but the first and last page...here in west TX, most riders are male, but it's probably around a 60/40 or maybe even a 55/45 split...we have all kinds of riders discipline wise --

As far as clothing/boots -- wear what YOU want!! I wear boots everyday, and fell they are MORE comfortable than any other form of footwear!! You just have to break them in properly. As for pants I always wear blue jeans. If you haven't been told yet, DO NOT wear boxers!!!! Wear some form of brief, when I am roping(riding hard and fast..) then I actually wear a compression style of underwear....almost like bike shorts...those will help keep things where they are supposed to be....

Just go and ride, and soon, all of your buds will be asking you where all of your newfound confidence, not to mention lady friends, have come from!!
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post #140 of 296 Old 06-12-2013, 01:25 PM
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and, btw, I am a retired Army Ranger...don't think any of "us" were ever referred to as "girlie" or "wimpy"....and most (even the ladies) that ride out here are about the most manly, womanly, tough type folks around that would probably scare the carp out of your parents if they came out to one of our events....

And, the boots that I wear everyday(I work training Army students here) are a western riding boot...with the walking heel. This type of boot works for both comfort and riding...so, I have a black and brown pair...goes with everything and I don't have to change them when I ride...
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