How do you get into Show Jumping?
   

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How do you get into Show Jumping?

This is a discussion on How do you get into Show Jumping? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • How much do horse jumping shows pay you
  • Want to show jump but have no money

 
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    11-22-2010, 04:52 PM
  #1
Foal
How do you get into Show Jumping?

I am interested in getting into this sort of horse sport. It seems like a alot of fun and interesting. This may sound a little nerdy and weird, but I starting liking it when I was playing my horse game.lol.

I heard of Hunter Jumping and Show Jumping. Are they the same thing? I thinking they are 2 different things. If so, I am probably thinking about Show Jumping.

How does one get involved in this sort of thing? I do not currently own a horse. I have heard you can lease horses, so I will look into that. I am only doing this for fun, and maybe a little competition once I get more training. What breeds are best for this sort of thing? I am thinking based on my previous thread, that it all depends on the horse itself rather than a breed. But I am also thinking there are breeds that excel at this better than others.

I am looking at my local stables, but from I have found out they are just boarding stables, where people keep their horses. But I will keep looking.

Thanks!
     
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    11-22-2010, 05:42 PM
  #2
Weanling
Quote:
I heard of Hunter Jumping and Show Jumping. Are they the same thing? I thinking they are 2 different things. If so, I am probably thinking about Show Jumping.
Hunters and show jumping are different. Hunters are judged on the way they go, the rider's equitation, and the horse's form over fences. Show jumping you're riding against the clock and having as little to no jumping faults as possible whether it be knocking down a rail or time penalties. Fastest time and little to no faults wins the class in Show Jumping.

As for getting involved, I'd say look for a barn that does lessons in jumping. You can lease but I'd say take some lessons first to see how you're going to like it and want to get more involved in the sport. It takes a lot of time, effort, and money even to do small shows here and there as you want to be safe for both you and the horse over fences.
Me, I got involved with jumping through Eventing. I wanted to try it, one day I saw a truck and trailer with a website on it, through that website got in touch with my former eventing coach and went from there, that's when I started jumping. When I decided to move my gelding closer to home, the only barn I liked was the hunter barn where I'm at now because of the care they give the horses and how safe the barn and pastures are.
The only thing I can suggest, is to keep looking around and also see if you can google local barns in your area.


     
    11-24-2010, 03:53 AM
  #3
Foal
Thanks for the advice. I am continuing looking and finding out more information. Are there stables that lease out horses for specific sports? Is there a directory that lists stables or show jumping?
     
    11-24-2010, 06:17 AM
  #4
Green Broke
Lease in the horse world doesn't just mean "hiring" a horse, it generally means taking full care of it and all the costs associated with it. It has the same responsibility of buying, except that there is no initial cost and of course you can give it back. In Australia, where I am from, the most common, well standard really, lease is a free lease. In this the lessee does not pay the owner anything and just assumes all costs for the horse. Generally the owner has little to do with the horse.

Although, judging by this board, in the USA many leases cost money, and the lessee must pay the owner a certain amount of money. This may cover board but it generally doesn't seem to.

Lessons are by far the best option for you. While Showjumping is not judged on "style", it definitely isn't all about the jumping. In fact, the jumping is really just the final "show". There is a lot of preparation required to get a horse and rider to that point. You might just think its about going around over jumps but its much more complex. The horse and rider must have established rhythm, collection and control. Many more "advanced" moves such as the flying change are required for showjumping.

For this reason the best riders seem to have a good foundation in dressage. If you haven't taken dressage lessons already I'd look into that. You want to have a real good walk, trot and canter, as well as walk to canter transitions and basic collection and extension before you start learning to jump. Once you have these skills down pat on a variety of horses then look at jumping.

If you have reached this level then look around for a good jumping school, but most English schools should be able to teach basic jumping.

In my experience, if you are leasing horses you don't have a wide choice. You sort of get what you can get. Often "good" horses aren't offered for lease. I'd try and get some good lessons and maybe through there you can find more horses to ride, or a potential lease.
     
    11-24-2010, 05:34 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskia    
Lease in the horse world doesn't just mean "hiring" a horse, it generally means taking full care of it and all the costs associated with it. It has the same responsibility of buying, except that there is no initial cost and of course you can give it back. In Australia, where I am from, the most common, well standard really, lease is a free lease. In this the lessee does not pay the owner anything and just assumes all costs for the horse. Generally the owner has little to do with the horse.

Although, judging by this board, in the USA many leases cost money, and the lessee must pay the owner a certain amount of money. This may cover board but it generally doesn't seem to.

Lessons are by far the best option for you. While Showjumping is not judged on "style", it definitely isn't all about the jumping. In fact, the jumping is really just the final "show". There is a lot of preparation required to get a horse and rider to that point. You might just think its about going around over jumps but its much more complex. The horse and rider must have established rhythm, collection and control. Many more "advanced" moves such as the flying change are required for showjumping.

For this reason the best riders seem to have a good foundation in dressage. If you haven't taken dressage lessons already I'd look into that. You want to have a real good walk, trot and canter, as well as walk to canter transitions and basic collection and extension before you start learning to jump. Once you have these skills down pat on a variety of horses then look at jumping.

If you have reached this level then look around for a good jumping school, but most English schools should be able to teach basic jumping.

In my experience, if you are leasing horses you don't have a wide choice. You sort of get what you can get. Often "good" horses aren't offered for lease. I'd try and get some good lessons and maybe through there you can find more horses to ride, or a potential lease.
I know that leasing isn't as cheap as it sounds, hence why I said I am looking into it. I am trying to see if owning or leasing a horse is better. I never counted out lessons(but I need a horse for lessons) and most places near me you either have to own a horse or be leasing one to get lessons.The lessons that offer horses are the ones for younger kids. I know the basics of riding a horse and I am not a child.

I also know very well that show jumping isn't about just jumping. I know it involves preparation, time, patience, and established bond between horse and rider. I am very aware of that.

I am not into Dressage very much, and prefer show jumping. I guess I will have to look into it. Being here in So Cal is probably different than Australia.
     
    11-24-2010, 08:47 PM
  #6
Yearling
It does not matter your state, country, discipline, anything, Dressage is the base to EVERYTHING. You can be running barrels, dressage is still there. In fact, all famous show jumping horses are extremely well schooled in dressage. I'm not sure what level they are usually at, but I'm thinking it's around 2 if not higher (somebody please correct me if they know).

Even though lesson horses are for "little kids" see if you can find lesson horses that jump. It is often better to learn on a "school master" so you can get down the basics and not have to worry about what your horse is doing. Trust me, some horses can be a bit energetic when jumping. *Ahem, mine* lol

I would definitely recommend leasing before purchasing, as it is important that you are sure that this is what you want to do before you go off buying a horse specific to that discipline. Most importantly, take lots of lessons and above all, have fun! Good luck!
     
    11-24-2010, 09:45 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by haleylvsshammy    
It does not matter your state, country, discipline, anything, Dressage is the base to EVERYTHING. You can be running barrels, dressage is still there. In fact, all famous show jumping horses are extremely well schooled in dressage. I'm not sure what level they are usually at, but I'm thinking it's around 2 if not higher (somebody please correct me if they know).

Even though lesson horses are for "little kids" see if you can find lesson horses that jump. It is often better to learn on a "school master" so you can get down the basics and not have to worry about what your horse is doing. Trust me, some horses can be a bit energetic when jumping. *Ahem, mine* lol

I would definitely recommend leasing before purchasing, as it is important that you are sure that this is what you want to do before you go off buying a horse specific to that discipline. Most importantly, take lots of lessons and above all, have fun! Good luck!
Never excluded the idea of Dressage. I just happen to prefer jumping to it.If its part of getting into jumping then I will.

The classes for little kids, is for little kids. They have age limits. I don't think I can get into a class that only goes up to 13 year olds(I am 19). And they use only Ponies because the most if not all the horses there belong someone.

As for the horse choosing, I would have the trainer help pick a horse or help suggest one.

I am though just curious on what breeds are good for this sport? Which breeds do you suggest or prefer when it comes to Jumping?

I really like, Arabians, Selle Francais, Hanoverian, Morgans, Palominos, Paints, Appys, and Irish Draughts.
     
    11-24-2010, 10:35 PM
  #8
Yearling
Like others have said. Hunters are about the way you look, the way the horse looks and the precision and form over fences. I don't know a lot about it as it never interested me.

Show Jumping is more my kinda thing. They don't judge your position or the horses jumping style. Its whoever can get around a course of jumps without knocking a rail in the fastest time. Lots of people take sharp corners and race around the course. Its an adrenaline rush.
     
    11-25-2010, 03:12 AM
  #9
Green Broke
Any horse can jump, and most of them can get to a reasonable height (1m-ish). For this reason you can learn the basics of jumping on most horses.

Higher than that you start to get the horses that are bred for jumping. They're bigger (usually 16.2hh + but many smaller ones can jump just as well), with strong bodies. The impact coming over a jump is significant. Warmbloods are traditionally bred for jumping. There are are a large variety, Hanovarian, Holstein, Trakener (sp?) etc. and just general Warmblood breeds and cross breeds. The jumping ability varies horse to horse, but generally the showjumping "heavy weights" ride Warmbloods. There are also a fair few Irish Sport Horses around, which might appeal to you because you like the Irish Draughts.

In the low to mid to mid high levels you see a lot of Thoroughbreds (again only based on Australia, but I imagine its similar world wide). These horses are MUCH cheaper than Warmbloods to purchase, and you can pick up one with some good training for an affordable price. They are often athletic horses that are reasonably versatile within the English disciplines.

As far as leasing vs. buying. If you can lease an experienced Showjumper then go for it but if you can only lease out an average horse then I think you'll be better off buying. Many people fall into the trap of leasing a horse to improve their riding or learn, but spend months training their lease horse up to their standard.

I think your ideal horse would be a horse with established dressage training and showjumping experience. You made it clear you don't like dressage - and it can take years of dressage before you and your horse are ready to jump (competitively) - so I would look at a horse who has the dressage down pat, so only you have to learn.

If you can't find a riding school that offers lessons, maybe there isn't much of a showjumping scene where you are?

You don't have to do "Showjumping" to jump for fun. Its a very competitive scene and you come up against a lot of riders who come from showjumping families, with meticulously bred horses and deep pockets.

The reason I reccommended lessons is you don't sound sure - if you are sure, and have given it a good go, start looking around at horses both the lease and buy.
     
    12-14-2010, 08:18 AM
  #10
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by haleylvsshammy    
It does not matter your state, country, discipline, anything, Dressage is the base to EVERYTHING. You can be running barrels, dressage is still there. In fact, all famous show jumping horses are extremely well schooled in dressage. I'm not sure what level they are usually at, but I'm thinking it's around 2 if not higher (somebody please correct me if they know).

Even though lesson horses are for "little kids" see if you can find lesson horses that jump. It is often better to learn on a "school master" so you can get down the basics and not have to worry about what your horse is doing. Trust me, some horses can be a bit energetic when jumping. *Ahem, mine* lol

I would definitely recommend leasing before purchasing, as it is important that you are sure that this is what you want to do before you go off buying a horse specific to that discipline. Most importantly, take lots of lessons and above all, have fun! Good luck!

AHHHH I hate that expression dressage is the base to everything not in all cases its not! Try it out loan a horse and gain some experience at the end of the day we all start somewhere
     

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