How do you "keep at the trot"? - Page 2
 
 

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How do you "keep at the trot"?

This is a discussion on How do you "keep at the trot"? within the Horse Riding forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Grip with inside thigh posting trot
  • How to rise at rhe trot using calves

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    04-25-2013, 08:41 PM
  #11
Started
Your supposed to have a relatively quiet leg, without your leg flying all over the place, you sink your heels down down down and that alone will help your leg to stay still. You really only grip with your calves if your on horses that need constant leg pressure to keep them moving, and actually not even then that often. But do not grip with your knees no matter what. It leaves you with a loose dangling leg, it throws your balance off, and makes it hard to give the horses leg aids, and when it comes time to jumping, it will be a absolute disaster. I would say most of your problem is your not sinking your heels down far enough. As far as keeping the horse going around a corner - When rising up at each up post you just remind your horse to keep moving by bumping him. If your heels are down, and your not gripping with your calves or knees, bumping the horse around the corner will not cause you too loose your stirrups. You really don't grip at all per say, you simply sink your weight in your heels and remain in a balanced position, with no calve or knee gripping
     
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    04-25-2013, 10:06 PM
  #12
Started
On top of everything else that has been said, core exercises are so awesome for everything
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    04-26-2013, 06:20 AM
  #13
Foal
I love all the advice, thank you so much everyone! I wish I can practice this now..maybe posting a video of my lesson would help.
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    04-26-2013, 06:49 AM
  #14
Foal
Okay, so looking at some old threads, the trot should be more of a back and forth than up and down. I never thought about that, I thought it was up and down. So I notice a difference if I bring my pelvis forward and back, not straight up and down.
     
    04-26-2013, 07:12 AM
  #15
Green Broke
I still have a problem gripping with my knees while posting. I have to consciously think about it or I'll grip with my knees and lose balance (posting is the only time I grip with my knees). When I realize I'm gripping with my knee, I usually just try and push my knees farther apart and sit a little deeper (not to stop though). When I do this, it feels like my whole lower body just relaxes and drops into place. It feels soo much better than when I grip with my knees. When I grip with my knees, I fall forward doing a stop, corner, turn, etc. I worked on it a lot yesterday (with stirrups because they'll flop all over the place and bother my poor mare for now (she'll get use to it soon).

I just wish every horse I rode naturally had a nice jog that I could comfortably sit instead of having to post, lol.
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    04-26-2013, 09:30 AM
  #16
Super Moderator
I don't grip with my legs at all, I might have a sort of folding my leg to the shape of the horse but its not a grip - a grip is tension and pressure - if I put pressure on my horses they would be buzzing all the time
If you allow your heel to drop then the leg will follow it downwards
If your struggling with the post then try to just sit at the trot for a while and feel the horses diagonal movement which is whats actually pushing you 'up/down' then try to allow that action to move you rather than you force your movement - which results in you 'over posting'
     
    04-26-2013, 10:48 AM
  #17
Foal
Ugh, this is my fault. I've been rising wrong for a few lessons and never brought up the issue with my instructor. This waste time and money.. Someone had said to grip with your inner thigh; but can someone just clarify? I am confused now on the whole mechanic of the posting trot. If you just sit with your heels down, that's just a sitting trot, so how do you rise?

It really sucks that I can't do anything about this until I am at the stables. Maybe the fault is on my instructor..but I'm more likely to blame myself. Sorry for bringing all my grief onto any of you with annoying questions. I feel like I should be learning faster because of my lesson limitations and it's really bothering me. I'm sorry if I may have missed something in someone's post about this issue (I'm not ignoring you, I just have trouble reading and concentrating at the same time, if that makes sense to any of you..) I'll honestly take my slow time to take notes on each post here.
     
    04-26-2013, 01:20 PM
  #18
Super Moderator
I think your only fault is that you're trying too hard.
Try to relax and feel the horses movement. Ask your instructor if you can limit the trot to shorter stretches so you don't have to worry so much about pushing the horse forwards
I don't like the word grip because its got too much restraint and tension in it - like your trying to stick on like a limpet rather than develop a natural balance
Starting out at sitting trot allows you to 'feel' the horses action.
If you can find some videos like this one you'll be able to see how its the horses movement that pushes you upwards
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UG9etQZIjTM
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    04-26-2013, 01:42 PM
  #19
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finalcanter    
Ugh, this is my fault. I've been rising wrong for a few lessons and never brought up the issue with my instructor. This waste time and money.. Someone had said to grip with your inner thigh; but can someone just clarify? I am confused now on the whole mechanic of the posting trot. If you just sit with your heels down, that's just a sitting trot, so how do you rise?

It really sucks that I can't do anything about this until I am at the stables. Maybe the fault is on my instructor..but I'm more likely to blame myself. Sorry for bringing all my grief onto any of you with annoying questions. I feel like I should be learning faster because of my lesson limitations and it's really bothering me. I'm sorry if I may have missed something in someone's post about this issue (I'm not ignoring you, I just have trouble reading and concentrating at the same time, if that makes sense to any of you..) I'll honestly take my slow time to take notes on each post here.
In my opinion I would say don't grip with your inner thighs. At all. Not even at a sitting trot. At a sitting trot you are simply relaxing your body and using you abdominal and back muscles to absorb the motion of the horse. Don't grip, don't tighten up, or you will end up bouncing about.

At a posting trot you are rising up with the leg on the wall, and coming down with the inside leg. All without gripping with your thighs, knees, or calves. Impulsion at a horses trot will naturally bring you out of the saddle, so learning the sitting trot first is best, so you can learn to feel the horses movements.
     
    04-26-2013, 01:50 PM
  #20
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by CowboyBob    
Its just a thought, you are getting a lot of good advice about your posting. About the problem of you horse stoping at the turns. I don't know how new of a rider you are but, I see kids were I work that have this same problem. I think, if its only on the turns then there is a chance you are thinking to much about the turn and losing the need to keep your speed up. Try thinking about the turn sooner think about what you need to do to get your horse though the turn at about half way between the turn you just left and the up coming turn. That way once you are to the turn you have already prepaired for it and you mind is free'er to work on controling your horse in the turn. Just a thought.

Cowboy Bob and I were thinking along the same lines ; prepare sooner. Get the horse more energetic BEFORE the turn. Look up and think forward.

All this will fall into place in time. Everyone goes through what you are going through when they start. Riding isn't easy, contrary to what some folks say. It takes time, strength and practice. That's why in it's highest form, it is considered an "Art".
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